Course Descriptions

2021-2022

AAC - APPLIED ARTS AND CRAFTS 

AAC 114.
METAL CASTING . (3) Pre- or corequisites: None Lab fee (does not include student materials) The focus will explore, through a series of hands on projects, various casting processes and wax working techniques associated with small scale nonferrous metal casting for the purpose of both jewelry and sculpture.

AAC 293. TOPICS. (3) Prerequisite: None Lab fee Topics may vary.

ACCT - ACCOUNTING 

ACCT 2110. 
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
An introduction to financial accounting concepts emphasizing the analysis of business transactions in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the effect of these transactions on the financial statements, financial analysis, and the interrelationships of the financial statements.

ACCT 2110X. 
FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING I. (3)
Prerequisites: MATH 1220
This course covers the accounting cycle and financial statements with emphasis on sole proprietorship.

ACCT 2110Y. 
FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING II. (3)
Prerequisites: ACCT 2110X
Upon completion of the course students will be able to: Use debit and credit accounting to record and adjust basic business transactions, use Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to record common business transactions involving long-term assets, investments, liabilities and stockholders' equity.

ACCT 2120. 
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II . (3)
Prerequisites: ACCT 2110.
An introduction to the use of accounting information in the management decision making processes of planning, implementing, and controlling business activities. In addition, the course will discuss the accumulation and classification of costs as well as demonstrate the difference between costing systems.


AMST - AMERICAN STUDIES 

AMST 1110. 
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
An introduction to the socially and politically constructed values ​​directing Americans' attitudes toward nature, science and technology and to the impacts of those attitudes on built and natural environments regionally, nationally and globally. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences. 

AMST 1120. 
INTRODUCTION TO GENDER STUDIES . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
While Gender Studies is truly a vast field of inquiry, there is great symmetry in the ways in which feminist scholars have been engaged with questions as to how disciplinary apparatuses and discourses shape and construct "gender." This course will begin with the process of peeking into this exciting scholarship, focusing on the "intersectional ties" of identity-that is, how gender has been produced in and through other categories of identity, such as race, class, sexuality, and nation . While there are numerous ways to structure such a course, this course will maneuver through the field of Gender Studies with an eye toward feminisms, race, and US Empire through processes of incarceration, colonialism, and war). In this course, we will explore how the "intersectional ties" of identities have been constructed within a range of institutions, discourses, and processes, such as law, medicine, popular culture, nationalism, colonialism, and empire. Throughout, we will pay close attention to how discourses normalize certain types of identities, practices, and behaviors, and mark others as deviant or unnatural. And, of course, we will look for strategies to contest these productions. This will necessarily place us within key debates in feminist studies of power, agency, activism, and justice at the individual, community, national, and transnational levels, and allow us to end the course by interrogating the role of Gender Studies in regard to current US occupation in the Middle East and Native America. This course will provide a strong foundation for you to pursue studies in feminist, queer, critical race,

AMST 1130.
INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course considers a range of theoretical approaches to the study of popular culture, including cultural studies and feminist theory as well as key concepts and key debates in the study of popular culture. It explores the ways popular culture is implicated in the formation of social determinants such as ethnicity, race, gender, class, and sexuality and conversely, how these social determinants are implicated in the formation of popular culture. The course also considers the ways in which popular culture serves as a site of ongoing political struggle. The aim of the course is to provide students with a critical vocabulary to make sense of broader significance and relevance of popular culture - why popular culture matters. To accomplish this, we will investigate a number of popular expressive forms including magazines, fandom, digital music,

AMST 1140.
INTRODUCTION TO RACE, CLASS AND ETHNICITY . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course offers an introduction to the field of American Studies through an interdisciplinary examination of race, class and ethnicity in the United States and in a global context. Using a schedule of keywords, we will engage a range of central themes and concerns. We will examine histories of injustice, and resistance to injustice. Readings and assignments encourage students to notice the privilege and oppression at the core of US society. The class will challenge the widely accepted assumption that we as a nation have moved beyond race and racism. Through readings, films, online sources, and our assignments, this course aims to increase our knowledge of inequality in our society, and the impact of those inequities on various societies and individuals. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AMST 1150.
INTRODUCTION TO SOUTHWEST STUDIES . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course introduces the complex histories, social issues, and cultural experiences of peoples of the southwestern United States. Course materials and discussions also demonstrate the possibilities of interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. We will examine cross-cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion; social and political economy. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities

AMST 1996. TOPICS . (1-6, no limit Δ)

AMST 2110.
AMERICAN LIFE AND THOUGHT . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course introduces students to cultural studies and the alternative interpretations of American history and culture. Particular attention will be paid to indigenous history, country music, tattoos, and American mobilization for war. Course materials and lectures will frequently use cultural traditions to explore key concepts and issues. Additionally, this course will require students to assume an analytical and critical perspective on academic interpretive models. We will read texts that exemplify critical Marxist, feminist, and reflexive anthropological approaches

AMST 2996.
TOPICS .
(1-6, no limit Δ )


ANTH - ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANTH 1115.
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience.   Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 1135.
INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (EVOLUTION AND HUMAN EMERGENCE). (3)
Corequisites: Biological Anthropology concentration students are required, and others are encouraged, to enroll concurrently in 1135L.
This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ANTH 1135L.
INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPLOGY LABORATORY (EVOLUTION AND HUMAN EMERGENCY LABORATORY). (1)
Corequisites: Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1135.
This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. Two hours lab.

ANTH 1140.
INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization, supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 1155.
INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This is an introductory course which provides an overview of the discipline of Linguistic Anthropology. The course will discuss the implications of language within anthropology, as well as within the sciences and social sciences more generally. The course explores the core concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, such as the basic structure of language, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and social and regional variations that are used to help students understand what it means to be human and the role of language in human societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 1170.
HUMAN LIFE. (3)
Corequisites: Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1170L.
Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ANTH 1211.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY. (3)
Corequisites: 1211L
This class explores different ways of studying and interpreting the past through a survey of archaeology’s historical, theoretical, and methodological development. If you are interested in archaeology as a career (or even just trying out an archaeological field school), this course is critical: it will provide you with the basic tools for conducting archaeological research and with an understanding of the background of the discipline. For this reason, this course is required for Anthropology majors with an Archaeology concentration. Even if you know you don’t want to be an archaeologist, though, this class may interest you. Have you ever wondered how archaeologists know what they know about the? Are you skeptical about some archaeological claims? Have you ever read a statement about the past and thought, “is this really true?” This class will provide you with the skills, both conceptual and practical, to answer those questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ANTH 1211L.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND LABORATORY. (1)
Corequisites: 1211.
Introduction to archaeological method and theory. Labs provide hands-on experience with methods of analyzing archaeological remains. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ANTH 1996.
TOPICS IN CURRENT ANTHROPOLOGY.
(1-6, no limit Δ [3, no limit Δ])

ANTH 2175.
WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
Archaeology is the systematic study of the human past through material remains. This course introduces students to the physical remains of past societies and compares and contrasts archaeological development in different regions. Students will explore the dynamics of the human past and its influences on contemporary society. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ANTH 2190C.
FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course is designed to introduce students to the forensic investigation of death. Emphasis will be on current methods and techniques and include the role of the anthropologist as an integral member of the investigation process.

ANTH 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


ARCH - ARCHITECTURE


ARCH 1120.
INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course provides students the tools and vocabulary to analyze, interpret and discuss the built environment from the social, historical, perceptual and technical determinants. Students are introduced to elements, principles, and theories of architecture through their social, historical, and technical determinants. The course seeks to lay a foundation in architectural studies, including introducing students to fundamental vocabulary and concepts.
Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARCH 1125.
DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
Introduces fundamental principles and processes of two-, three-, and four-dimensional design. Design aesthetics, perception, technique, composition, evaluation of materials and methods, practicing design methodologies, exploring design principles and theories, and graphic authorship are explored through various types of assignments.  


ARSC - ARTS AND SCIENCES 

ARSC 198.
FRESHMAN SEMINAR TOPICS
. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ [3])
Restriction: freshman standing. Pre- or corequisites: None
Variable content in an academic discipline. Through study of topic, develops academic skills including scholarship, research, comprehension, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, application, critical thinking, and communication of ideas. Most sections require coregistration in a specified "linked" course.


ARTH - ART HISTORY 

ARTH 1120.
INTRODUCTION TO ART. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
In this class, students will be introduced to the nature, vocabulary, media and history of the visual arts, illustrated by examples drawn from many cultures, both Western and non-Western and across many centuries. We will begin with a general overview of the subject, including basic concepts and themes that shed light on the continuity of the artistic enterprise across the span of human experience. We will study the visual elements from which art is made, including how artists use these elements and how the artists' use of visual elements affects our experience of looking at art. We will examine both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media including drawing, painting, printmaking, camera and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture, installation, crafts and architecture. Selected works will be examined in context, including the history of the time and place in which they were created, as well as their function, patronage, and the character and intent of individual artists.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTH 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

ARTH 2110.
HISTORY OF ART I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This survey course explores the art and architecture of ancient pre-historic cultures through the end of the fourteenth century. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTH 2120.
HISTORY OF ART II. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This survey course will explore the architecture, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and glass objects from the 14th century to the modern era. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTH 2130.
MODERN ART. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course is an overview of European and American art and architecture during the Modern era. Students will analyze the various movements in art as they relate to the historical settings in which the works were created. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual and cultural movements as they affected and were affected by their creation and development.

ARTH 2245.
HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the major trends in the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of photography from its beginnings in the 1830's to the recent practices of photographers and artists working with photographic technologies. Together we will investigate photography’s role as an artistic medium as a central focus, as well as its broader role in our visual, political, and social culture. Textbook readings, online lectures, discussions boards, exams, and other activities will assist students in gaining a critical understanding of photography.

ARTH 252.
CONTEMPORARY ART AND NEW MEDIA. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course surveys the roots and evolution of what is now regarded as New Media and Contemporary Art, those pioneering new forms and technologies that often blur the boundaries between art, science, and technology.

ARTH 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)


ARTS - ART STUDIO

ARTS 1220.
ART PRACTICES I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1230.
ART PRACTICES II. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1220. Lab Fee.
This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of MOTIVE and CHANGE while developing concepts, techniques, and processes involved in working in the third dimension.

ARTS 1310.
INTRODUCTION TO CERAMICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include hand building and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1320.
CERAMICS I. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1310. Lab Fee.
An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques.

ARTS 141.
INTRODUCTION TO ART AND ECOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course introduces the student to three basic skills of an ecological art practice: research, making, and an immersion in ecological systems through poetic thinking, subversive action, and creative fabrication.

ARTS 1410.
INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers technical information on camera use and functionality, composition and visual design, digital workflow and editing, professional functions of manipulating and enhancing images, and printing correctly and effectively. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1510.
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONIC ARTS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
This course will be an introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. The course will explore the history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with electronic art practice, as well as introduce students to the basic tools and associated technologies. This studio course will introduce simple electronics, software and ideas for working with sound, video, and the Internet to create artwork. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1610.
DRAWING I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space and composition. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1630.
PAINTING I. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1610. Lab fee.
This course introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1710.
INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1610. Lab Fee
This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1810.
JEWELRY AND SMALL METAL CONSTRUCTION I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab Fee. 
This course introduces the basic techniques, materials, and tools traditionally used in the creation of jewelry and/or small-scale sculptural objects. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

ARTS 1830.
SHOP FOUNDATION. (2)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab Fee. 
This course provides an introduction to the proper use of shop facilities with an emphasis on the safety procedures required for their proper use. The course will provide the student with a foundation of technical skills for use in the production of their work in subsequent classes.
Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

ARTS 1840.
SCULPTURE I. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1830.
This course introduces the student to a variety of medium and techniques used in the production of sculpture; along with the historic, conceptual, and esthetic foundations of the sculptural process. 

ARTS 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

ARTS 2420.
VISUALIZING IDEAS. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1410. Lab fee.
The course is dedicated to teaching how to visualize ideas within the photographic medium by combining theoretical content and aesthetic form to create a conceptually rich body of work. It explores advanced digital photography, including perfecting use of the camera and relevant digital software, and honing inkjet printing skills. We will explore new techniques and workflows, and use them to respond to a variety of themes and concerns. We will look at a number of contemporary photographic practitioners, and discuss a multitude of historical and contemporary approaches to the same ideas we will be probing.

ARTS 2522.
DIGITAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 2420.
This course is an introduction to the artistic possibilities of digital compositing and other lens based digital techniques. In this course you will learn to use Adobe’s Photoshop to generate digital images both for electronic output and for making prints. Over the course of the semester we will be focusing on creating five projects expressing your personal artistic vision. The best projects will be the ones in which the technical issues of photography, particularly digital compositing, are used to further the artist’s concept. In other words, make the projects your own, use the techniques to explore ideas and images you care about. Don’t just fulfill the assignment. Most importantly have fun.

ARTS 2523.
VIDEO ART I. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1510.
This studio class is an in-depth introduction to video as an art form; the focus will include theory, history and practice of video art as an extension of visual art and as a time-based medium. Video Art’s roots lie in consumer technology, TV, cultural, political and avant-garde film history. This time and light based medium, has a relatively short history and encompasses technological (and scientific) developments, cultural movements and has recently become a ubiquitous art practice. Set up as an online research laboratory, the class will help students to further develop their personal video work while experimenting with various styles and formats of video art. The equipment and demonstrations explored in the class are within a context defined by the history, aesthetics, and theory of video art practice. The emphasis of this class is on the student finding their own personal voice, and incorporating an innovative approach to their video work. Students are also expected to achieve a level of technical competence and confidence needed to undertake more ambitious and sophisticated work. Current and significant contemporary video works and critical writings will be viewed, read and discussed in online forums. This class aims to challenge notions of what video art is, and can be. Students are expected to think outside the box and try new approaches to this time-based media. Students will learn to seek out new audiences and create unique methods of presenting video online.

ARTS 2610.
DRAWING II. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1610. Lab fee.
This course introduces color and colored media as an element of composition while emphasizing descriptive and perceptual drawing skills and conceptual approaches to contemporary drawing.

ARTS 2630.
PAINTING II
. (3, may be repeated once Δ)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1630.
This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of-class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques.

ARTS 2810.
JEWELRY AND SMALL METAL CONSTRUCTION II. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1810. Lab Fee.
Fabrication skills are further developed and refined while additional advanced fabrication methods are introduced. Emphasis is placed on developing a deeper understanding of form and content as it relates to creating on an intimate scale.

ARTS 2892.
SOUND ART I. (3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 1510.
An investigation of sound as a medium within a fine art context. Course will explore history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with sound art and develop student's skills in sound editing/recording technology.

ARTS 2996.
SPECIAL TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
Topics may vary.


ASTR - ASTRONOMY 

ASTR 1115.
INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course surveys observations, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. The course is predominantly for non-science majors, aiming to provide a conceptual understanding of the universe and the basic physics that governs it. Due to the broad coverage of this course, the specific topics and concepts treated may vary. Commonly presented subjects include the general movements of the sky and history of astronomy, followed by an introduction to basic physics concepts like Newton’s and Kepler’s laws of motion. The course may also provide modern details and facts about celestial bodies in our solar system, as well as differentiation between them: Terrestrial and Jovian planets, exoplanets, the practical meaning of “dwarf planets”, asteroids, comets, and Kuiper Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. Beyond this we may study stars and galaxies, star clusters, nebulae, black holes, clusters of galaxies and dark matter. Finally, we may study cosmology, the structure and history of the universe. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ASTR 1115L.
INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: ASTR 1115.
Includes hands-on exercises that work to reinforce concepts covered in the lecture, and may include additional components that introduce students to the night sky. Two hours lab.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ASTR 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated three times Δ])

ASTR 2110.
GENERAL ASTRONOMY I. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512. 
Pre- or corequisites: PHYS 1230 or PHYS 1310.
An introductory course covering the basics of the night sky, relevant physics, and the Solar System. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. First of a two-semester sequence.

ASTR 2110L.
GENERAL ASTRONOMY I LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: ASTR 2110.
Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with 2110. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Three hours lab.

ASTR 2115.
GENERAL ASTRONOMY II. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250. 
Pre- or corequisite: Any physics course numbered 1200 or higher.
An introductory course covering the Sun, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Second of a two-semester sequence.

ASTR 2115L.
GENERAL ASTRONOMY II LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: ASTR 2115.
Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with ASTR 2115. Three hours lab.

ASTR 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


BCIS - FUNDAMENTAL OF INFORMATION LITERACY AND SYSTEMS


BCIS 1110.
FUNDAMENTAL OF INFORMATION LITERACY AND SYSTEMS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1215 or (MATH 1215X and MATH 1215Y and MATH 1215Z) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522.
Examination of information systems and their impact on commerce, education, and personal activities. Utilization of productivity tools for communications, data analysis, information management and decision-making.
Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science.


BIOL - BIOLOGY 

BIOL 1110.
GENERAL BIOLOGY
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces non-science majors to basic biological concepts including, but not limited to, the properties of life, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Three lectures.  Credit for both this course and BIOL 1140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Three lectures. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. 

BIOL 1110L.
GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 1110.
This laboratory course for non-science majors compliments the concepts covered in the associated general biology lecture course. Students will learn quantitative skills involved in scientific measurement and data analysis. Students will also perform experiments related to topics such as biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, evolution, taxonomic classification and phylogeny, biodiversity, and ecology. One 3-hour lab per week including plant and animal diversity, techniques and investigation of current issues.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 1140.
BIOLOGY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This introductory biology course for students interested in health science careers focuses on the concepts of chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, and regulation of gene expression. Not accepted toward the Biology major. Credit for both this course and BIOL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 1140L.
BIOLOGY FOR HEALTH-RELATED SCIENCES AND NON-MAJORS LAB. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 1140.
This course is a laboratory that complements the concepts learned in the theory course. Students will learn skills involved in scientific measurement, microscopy, and mathematical analysis. Students will also perform experiments and data analysis related to cell structure and function, chemistry, enzyme activity, and genetics. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

BIOL 1150.
BIODIVERSITY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Biodiversity is the variety of life on earth. There are 2-10 million species on earth, but this number surely is vastly underestimated. Moreover, 99% of all species that ever existed are extinct. This course provides a broad survey of biodiversity-past, present, and future-with an emphasis on major groups in the tree of life (e.g., insects, plants, vertebrates, fungi, bacteria, etc.) and how humans interact with earth's biodiversity. We will explore biodiversity as it relates to earth history, mass extinctions, conservation, economics, ecology, evolution, and human society. We will also explore ways in which we categorize biodiversity (taxonomy and systematics) and catalog it for study (museums).

BIOL 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

BIOL 2110C.
PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY: CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR LECTURE AND LABORATORY. (4)
Prerequisite: (CHEM 1215 or CHEM 1217) and CHEM 1215L.
This course introduces students to major topics in general biology. This course focuses on the principles of structure and function of living things at the molecular, cellular and organismic levels of organization. Major topics included are introduction to the scientific process, chemistry of cells, organization of cells, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Three lectures, one discussion section.

BIOL 2210.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I. (3)
Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215).
This course is the first of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for Biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on anatomic, directional, and sectional terminology, basic cellular structure and metabolism, tissue differentiation and characteristics, and organ system structure and function; Specifically, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Three lectures.

BIOL 2210L.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: 2210.
This is the first in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems.

BIOL 2225.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II. (3)
Prerequisite: BIOL 2110.
This course is the second of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on specific cellular, tissue, and organ structure and physiology, and organ system structure and function; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Additionally, an analysis of these concepts is included: fluid and electrolyte balance, pregnancy, growth and development from zygote to newborn, and heredity. Three lectures.

BIOL 2225L.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 2225.
This is the second in a series of two laboratory courses designed to introduce laboratory practices and techniques for human anatomy and physiology, from the basic cell structure through the organ system level; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Three hours lab.

BIOL 2305.
MICROBIOLOGY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES. (4)
Prerequisite: ((BIOL 1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or (CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L)).
This course introduces the basic principles of microbial structure, genetics, and physiology, virology, parasitology, disease, pathogenicity, epidemiology and immunology. Only some emphasis is given to basic biological principles. The course is designed for those obtaining a career in the health sciences. Not accepted toward the Biology major or minor.
Credit for both this course and BIOL **351/**352L may not be applied toward a degree program. 

BIOL 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)
Topics may vary.


BSTC - BUSINESS TECHNOLOGIES

BSTC 175.
PROFESSIONAL READINESS. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course engages students in self-reflection and work place skill enhancement, including workplace ethics, working with teams, academic success, self-advocacy and leadership development.  This course will help students to develop verbal and nonverbal communication skills, project development and reporting, and conflict management skills by working independently and with teams to solve everyday workplace issues.

BSTC 193.
TOPICS. (1-3)

BSTC 293.
TOPICS.(1-3)


BUSA - BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUSA 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Fundamental concepts and terminology of business including areas such as management, marketing, accounting, economics, personnel, and finance; and the global environment in which they operate.

BUSA 1996.
SPECIAL TOPICS
. (3, may be repeated once Δ)
Selected offering of topics not represented in the regular curriculum.
Restriction: permission of instructor.

BUSA 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)


CADT - COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 

CADT 171.
COMPUTER MODELING AND 3D PRINTING. (4) 
Pre- or corequisites: None. 
3-D printing technology is currently used in architecture, industrial design, the automotive industry, aerospace, the military, engineering, the dental and medical industries, biotechnology, jewelry, eyewear, education, and many other fields. In this introductory course students will learn how to both operate 3-Dimensional software on a computer and to fabricate actual simple and complex objects in the computer lab. Students will have the opportunity to work on 3-D printing machines that use a variety of contemporary media including PLA and Carbon Fiber. Students will start with class assignments and have time to design and fabricate custom projects. Additive and Subtractive technologies will be taught in this class.  There will be daily discussions and lectures on 3-D fabrication career opportunities.

CADT 191.
INTRO 3D PRINTING. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None. 
In this course students will learn how to be “makers” by using various types of 3D modeling software and imaging equipment, printing actual physical objects that they have designed and modeled themselves, and participating in educational outreach in the university and the community.

CADT 294.
3D PRINTING PROJECT. (4)
CADT 294 is an intermediate lab class where students can design and fabricate their own custom 3-D Objects using the UNMTaos Computer lab equipment and guided by the instructor. This will be a 100% hands-on design and fabrication class. Students will be expected to have a basic understanding of the 3- Printing and Design skillsets. Instructor approval suggested.


CART - CULINARY ARTS 

CART 101.
INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY ARTS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
An introduction to the fundamentals of professional food preparation to include product identification, basic skill development, dexterity, safety, and sanitation in the kitchen.  This class will focus on the use of seasonal fruits, vegetables, and grains and will provide the student with the basics of quality control, weights and measures, terms, professionalism, and communication.

CART 102.
SOUPS, STOCKS, AND SAUCES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
Emphasis will be placed on classical techniques in the preparation of mother sauces and th
eir derivatives, proper stock preparation, reduction, storage, and usage. This course also covers the assembly of clear broth, legume, velouté, chowders, bisques and cream soups, and focuses on the preparation of vegetarian, meat, poultry, and seafood entreés.

CART 103.
INTERNATIONAL CUISINE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course affords the opportunity for the student to practice skills acquired in 101 and 102 using the medium of international cuisine. This course will explore the cuisines of France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Mexico, and more. Learn to work with the ingredients that are adding excitement to the global market basket. Study a variety of approaches to preparing and presenting the final dish.

CART 106.
SERVSAFE FOOD HANDLER TRAINING. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
The Food Handler course is a short version of the ServSafe Manager Training course.  It covers the basics of how to serve food safely using sanitation procedures and skills.  It is meant for beginning food servers and food service personnel.  

CART 108.
SERVSAFE. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
National Restaurant Association’s food safety training covers these concepts: the importance of Food Safety, Good Personal Hygiene, Time and Temperature Control, Preventing Cross- Contamination, Cleaning and Sanitizing, Safe Food Preparation, Receiving and Storing Food, Methods of Thawing, Cooking, Cooling and Reheating Food, HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), Food Safety Regulations

CART 109.
TABLE SERVICE INTERNSHIP. (3)
Prerequisites: CART 101, 102, 103, 107 OR MGMT 101, and 12 hours of electives.  Lab fee.
This is the second to the last course necessary for completion of the Culinary Arts Certificate Program. This class provides clear, straightforward techniques needed to assure excellent table service. The course also allows the opportunity for the student to have an overview of an entire restaurant operation.

CART 110.
CULINARY ARTS INTERNSHIP. (3)
Prerequisite: CART 109. Lab fee.
This is the final course necessary for completion of the Culinary Arts Certificate Program. This course allows the student to work 45 hours in a professional restaurant environment. This is a hands-on, work-study class. It will provide the student the opportunity to practice real world techniques in the culinary arts profession.

CART 120.
NUEVO LATINO CUISINE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This class gives the student an in depth look at the art of New Mexican Cuisine as we explore the cultures that have influenced the tastes of New Mexico. The class will begin by looking at the origin of the spices, flavors, and traditional methods that form the New Mexican style of cooking. Students will discover and move through the food cultures of Native Americans, Spanish, and Latin America that all formed New Mexico cuisine as we know it today. This class will give the student knowledge of international cuisine and traditional cooking methods.

CART 123.
COOKING FOR HEALTH, DIET, AND WELLNESS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course will focus on healthy cooking methods and menu selection. Delicious, fresh and healthy eating, with recipes that can be adapted to individual requirements.

CART 124.
ASIAN CUISINE. (3)
Exploration of the cuisine of Asian countries including, China, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam. There will be strong emphasis on the specific ingredients and techniques used in each culture as well as timing and presentation. 3 Lecture hours.

CART 128.
SEAFOOD IN TAOS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course will focus on handling and preparation of seafood and fish. We will learn varied recipes, sauces, and cooking methods, study and apply industry standards for healthy handling and sanitation.

CART 129.
PROFESSIONAL BAKING. (3)
Professional Baking provides and builds basic baking and culinary skills needed to produce baked products. It offers an introduction to baking and culinary arts terminology and principles including food safety and sanitation. 

CART 150.
INTRODUCTION TO PASTRIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
An introduction to the efficient fabrication of savory and sweet baked goods, desserts, and pastries. Appropriate hands-on preparation of multiple classic and modern recipes will provide students with a foundation in baking and dessert manufacturing. Emphasis will be placed on production for the modern restaurant.

CART 156.
FANCY CAKE DECORATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
Provides students with the ability to prepare and use various icings, fillings and glazes. Learn different garnishing techniques with a Pastry Bag such as flowers, borders and lattice work.

CART 160.
THE ART OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CARVING. (3)
This course will be an introduction to the culinary art of fruit carving, giving students the basic techniques and tips to creating fruit carvings to enhance their food.

CART 293.
TOPICS: CULINARY ARTS. (1-3)
Prerequisite: None Topics may vary.


CCST - CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES 

CCST 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE GLOBAL AND ETHNIC SOCIETIES. (3.
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The course explores historical and contemporary social forces that impact ethnic communities across the Americas. Students will examine social and economic dynamics of Indigenous, Latino, Asian-Pacific, Africana communities and women’s experiences in these societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

CCST 1125.
CHICANA-O LATINA-O MUSICAL CULTURES AND EXPRESSIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The course explores diverse musical expressions of Chicana/o and Latina/o peoples in the present geographical boundaries of the United States. The course emphasizes the intercultural dynamics in the formation of Chicano and Latino music, which incorporates American, Latin American, African, Native American, and European roots.

CCST 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

CCST 2110.
Pre- or corequisites: None.
INTRODUCTION TO CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES
. (3)
Introductory survey of the Mexican American experience in the United States, with special reference to New Mexico. Exploration of historical, political, social, and cultural dimensions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

CCST 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


CDL - COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE

CDL 110.
CDL A. (3)
Corequisites: CDL 111, 120, 121, 210.
Knowledge portion of the CDL training which covers a broad range of topics, including preparation for NM CDL knowledge test, safety, career choices, log books, mapping, load weights and distribution.

CDL 111.
CDL ROAD DRIVING. (3)
Corequisites: CDL 110, 120, 121, 210.
Student time is spent behind the wheel of tractor-trailer driving on public roads and developing the skills necessary to operate a tractor trailer safely and prepare the students for the road portion of the NM CDL Skills test.

CDL 120.
CDL RANGE & YARD SKILLS. (3)
Corequisites: CDL 110, 111, 121, 210.
Yard skills focuses developing the skills needed to successfully maneuver a tractor trailer.

CDL 121.
ENDORSEMENT TRAINING. (3)
Corequisites: CDL 110, 111, 120, 210.
Prepares students to acquire endorsements such as Hazardous materials, tankers and doubles and triples.

CDL 210.
YARD SKILLS II. (3)
Corequisites: CDL 110, 111, 120, 121.
Prepares students for their pre-trip inspection, air brake inspection, and will cover braking systems. 


CHEM - CHEMISTRY 

CHEM 1105.
PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE CHEMISTRY. (2)

Pre- or corequisites: None.
A preparatory course for students who feel they are not prepared, or who do not have the prerequisite requirements for CHEM 1215/1215L. A grade of "CR" can be used as placement into CHEM 1215/1215L.  Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

CHEM 1106.
FOUNDATIONS OF CHEMISTRY
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A unique preparatory course for CHEM 1215 and your subsequent chemistry courses. It has a dual purpose; firstly, to help you obtain a solid foundation in the chemical concepts that are essential to your future chemistry and science classes, and secondly to optimize your set of learning skills to help you learn more efficiently, demonstrate your knowledge and succeed in your future fast-paced high-level science courses.

CHEM 1110C.
CHEMISTRY IN OUR COMMUNITY LECTURE AND LABORATORY. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce non-science majors to the basic chemistry required to understand topics of current interest affecting their communities, such as air and water quality, global climate change, use of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources. Experiments will illustrate chemical principles and acquaint students with scientific methods, data processing, critical thinking and scientific writing.

CHEM 1120C.
INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY FOR NON-MAJORS LECTURE AND LABORATORY. (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1215Z or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540. This course covers qualitative and quantitative areas of non-organic general chemistry for non-science majors and some health professions. Students will learn and apply principles pertaining, but not limited to, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, acids and bases, mass relationships, and solutions. The laboratory component introduces students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Three lectures, 3 hours demo lab/recitation. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1215 may not be applied toward a degree program. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1217 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.  

CHEM 1215.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I FOR STEM MAJORS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math=>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or Corequisite: CHEM 1215L.
This course is intended to serve as an introduction to general chemistry for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre-professional programs. Students will be introduced to several fundamental concepts, including mole, concentration, heat, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, bonding, physical states, stoichiometry, and reactions. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1215L.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: ((1105 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540) and ALEKS1 =>50%) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math=>25 or SAT Math Section =>590.  Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 1215 or 1217.
The first-semester laboratory course designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment.

CHEM 1217.
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: 1215L.
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math=>28 or SAT Math Section =>660.
As the first of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including the electronic structure of atoms, chemical periodicity, nature of chemical bonds, molecular structure, the three phases of matter, etc. In addition, the application of these concepts to various chemical sub-disciplines, such as organic chemistry, biochemistry, and materials chemistry. Designed for majors in chemical sciences and engineering, it is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. Three lectures per week.  Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1225.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II FOR STEM MAJORS. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 1225L
Prerequisite: ((1215 or 1217) and 1215L) or ALEKS2 =>50%. Pre- or corequisite: 1225L.
This course is intended to serve as a continuation of general chemistry principles for students enrolled in science, engineering, and certain pre-professional programs. The course includes, but is not limited to a theoretical and quantitative coverage of solutions and their properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Additional topics may include (as time permits) organic, polymer, atmospheric, and biochemistry. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1227 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1225L.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II FOR STEM MAJORS LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: ((CHEM 1215 or 1217) and 1215L) or ALEKS2 =>50%. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 1225 or 1227.
Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 1227.
PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II. (3)
Prerequisite: (CHEM 1215 or 1217) and 1215L. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 1225L.
As the second of a two-semester sequence, this course teaches fundamental concepts in chemistry, including solutions, equilibria, electrochemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics. Designed for majors in chemical sciences and engineering, it is assumed that the students are familiar with college algebra, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, and scientific measurements. Three lectures per week. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1225 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CHEM 2120.
INTEGRATED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY. (4)
Prerequisite: CHEM 1120 or 1215.
The second of a two-semester sequence of laboratory courses designed to complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. The laboratory component will introduce students to techniques for obtaining and analyzing experimental observations pertaining to chemistry using diverse methods and equipment. Credit for both this course and CHEM **301 may not be applied toward a degree program.

CHEM 2310C.
QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS LECTURE AND LABORATORY. (4)
Prerequisite: (CHEM 1225 or 132) and 1225L.
Quantitative analysis is a subdiscipline within analytical chemistry which deals with the identification and assay of a material or its components. Students will learn how chemical characterization involves chemical reactivity, physical measurement, and data interpretation with an emphasis on solution equilibria and electrochemistry. The study of precise and reliable chemical characterization is fundamental to further study and practice in chemistry, biology, medicine, geology, chemical engineering, and many other related fields. The understanding of the methods and limitations of chemical characterization can aid in making informed judgments on a large variety of social and political issues. This course is designed to introduce you to techniques of quantitative analysis and complement the theory and concepts presented in lecture. Students will obtain reproducible quantitative laboratory data using classical (volumetric, gravimetric) and simple instrumental (potentiometric, spectrophotometric, chromatographic) methods, as well as analyze and interpret laboratory data using standard statistical and validation approaches. Three lectures, 4 hours lab.


CJUS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CJUS 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This introductory course will examine the history and philosophy of the Criminal Justice system. It will also discuss each of the components in the system.

CJUS 1120.
CRIMINAL LAW. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introductory study of the philosophy, development, and social basis of U.S. and New Mexico criminal law and constitutional procedure. Topics include an overview of the classification of crime, the elements of and parties to a crime, defenses, pertinent principles of evidence, laws of arrest and search and seizure and their application in the legal process.

CJUS 1140.
JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A study of the juvenile justice system, with particular emphasis on New Mexico; history of the juvenile court; juvenile court practices and procedures; neglect; dependency and delinquency; jurisdiction of the court; and the roles of the police officer, the juvenile correctional officer, social service worker and other human service workers in the juvenile justice system. This course will also explore alternative juvenile justice programs that have proven successful around the country.

CJUS 1170.
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This introductory course will examine the history and philosophy of the Criminal Justice system. It will also discuss each of the components in the system. 

CJUS 1410.
LAW
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Criminal procedure from apprehension to conviction: arrest, extradition, trial procedures, appeal, and punishment. 

CJUS 2120.
CRIMINAL COURTS AND PROCEDURES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Structures and functions of American courts. Roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel, operation of petit and grand juries, trial and appellate courts.

CJUS 2130.
POLICE AND SOCIETY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A study of the relationship between the Criminal Justice system and the community. Concepts in interpersonal communication stress management, personal prejudices, community influences, media relations, and crime prevention will also be included. 

CJUS 2140.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Study of the criminal investigation process which includes crime scene management, evidentiary concerns, sources of information, and interview concepts. 

CJUS 2150.
CORRECTIONS SYSTEM. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A study of the history, philosophy, legal issues, research, and models of the corrections system and the impact of the system on prisoners and society. The corrections process, the rights of the convicted criminal and correctional systems and community corrections and other alternative sentencing programs.

CJUS 2160.
FIELD EXPERINCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Planned program of observation and practical experience in selected criminal justice agencies representing the major classification corpus delicti and punishment of various criminal acts; legal research and case study. 

CJUS 2225.
INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A study of the history, philosophy, legal issues, research, and models of the corrections system and the impact of the system on prisoners and society. The corrections process, the rights of the convicted criminal and correctional systems and community corrections and other alternative sentencing programs.


CLST - CLASSICS 

CLST 1110.
GREEK MYTHOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English.

CLST 2110.
GREEK CIVILIZATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Greece. Lectures on Greek art, history, literature and philosophy.

CLST 2120.
ROMAN CIVILIZATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Rome. Lectures on Roman literature, history, art and philosophy.


CNST - CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES 

CNST 101.
LAYOUT & FRAMING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
Students will learn layout, setting joists, and both wall and roof framing. Students are taught the difference between various insulation, for example, R valves and faced and un-faced insulation.

CNST 103.
EXTERIOR FINISHING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
A study of exterior trim techniques, selection of doors and windows, methods of installation. Includes overview of paint, stains, and prefabricated materials.

CNST 104
NCCER CORE. (3)
Required introduction to the National Center for Construction Education and Research for certification. Topics studied include basic math, communications, prints, methods, and ethics. Students demonstrate skills level through laboratory assignments.

CNST 105.
INTERIOR FINISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: None. Lab fee
A study of the interior of a building which includes methods of wall, ceiling, and floor finishing. The use of different types of covering, paint, paneling, and texture will be emphasized. The installation of decorative tile for bathroom, kitchen, and floors will be explored.

CNST 106.
CABINET BUILDING. (3)
A study of cabinet making. Students will have the opportunity to make kitchen, bathroom and special cabinets. Includes construction methods of cabinet making as well as various finishing techniques. Counter top materials, such as formica, will be examined. Taught through classroom and lab experience.

CNST 108.
3D CAD. (3)
This is an introductory course in learning to create 3 Dimensional computer models of buildings using Google SketchUp software.

CNST 109.
PLUMBING THEORY I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
Introduction to plumbing occupations, safety, tools, equipment, and human relations in the plumbing trade. Covers plumbing components, sizes of various residential and commercial plumbing systems, pipe fitting and joining, and cost estimating.

CNST 111.
INTRO TO WELDING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
This course serves as an introduction to welding with a concentrated emphasis on developing techniques required in the profession of welding. In this introductory course we will focus on the technique of Arc Welding.

CNST 114.
SOLAR ADOBE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. 
The integration of passive solar heating systems into the design of adobe homes. Topics include direct gain systems, Trombe Wall (indirect gain) systems and greenhouses/sunspaces. Students will learn the advantages and disadvantages of each system in order to choose among them for use in different parts of a house or commercial structure. Students will calculate the proper sizing of systems as well as auxiliary back-up systems.

CNST 116.
METAL SHOP. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
In this course students learn the basics of welding, cutting and fabrication. Tools, safety procedures and assembly will be demonstrated. Students will construct individual projects. Course does not include student materials.

CNST 118.
ALTERNATIVE BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. 
An overview and evaluation of construction techniques and systems currently in use in the Southwest. The course will include poured pumice, hay bale, and stacked tire techniques, solar, and low-cost considerations. This class will visit representative construction sites.

CNST 120.
PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICITY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
Study of AC and DC circuits and components. Practical applications of electrical principles and practice on circuit boards. Use of calculations derived from formulas of electrical functions. Working principles and proper use of various electrical motors.

CNST 121.
ELECTRICAL WIRING. (3)
This course is an introduction to the world of electricity and the field of Journeyman Electrician. The course content will be divided into the 3 main subject areas of: 1.) Basic Electric Theory; 2.) National Electric Code - NFPA-70; and 3.) Electrical System Fabrication and Installation.

CNST 124.
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This lab class will be focusing upon the hands-on exploration on materials that are discussed in other CNST Tech program classes. Green, or Sustainable Architecture relies upon a “Systems Approach” to understanding how buildings perform. We will be limiting our materials study to Residential construction in this lab class.

CNST 127.
INTRO SOLAR TECHNOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Intro to Solar Technology will cover solar photovoltaic renewable energy and will start with the basics of electricity, describe the parts of a solar pv system and how they work, size a solar system to specific location, and design a solar pv system to meet the needs of that site.

CNST 136.
SUSTAINABLE FOOD FARMING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
In this course, students will develop a deep understanding and appreciation of farming practices, growing and marketing “real” food, farm-based educational systems, food advocacy, community development, sustainability, and public policy.

CNST 137.
ALTERNATE BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Students in this course will study in depth the materials and methods used in Alternative Construction processes that are not typically found in the generic building codes used throughout the modern world.

CNST 174.
DESIGN FOR GREEN BUILDING. (3)
his Green Building course provides a broad survey of construction materials and methods while evaluating for aspects of sustainability. Students will explore topics such as Climate change, Renewable energy, Agriculture, Materials science, Life cycle costs, Ecological footprints, and embodied energy. This course is a study of housing that is informed by the contrast between Regenerative design and “Conventional” building. We will study the roots of shelter back to cave dwelling times and explore the possibilities for the future with an introduction to current best practices like the Living Building Challenge that has been adopted by the state of Hawaii for all new Public School buildings.  

CNST 175.
BLUEPRINT READING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. 
An introduction to blueprint reading for builders to help students interpret the ideas of designers and architects and to express their own ideas through drawings. Stresses necessary skills and process used in architectural drafting.

CNST 184.
GENERAL CARPENTRY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
This course will have two components: a classroom segment, where carpentry concepts will be explored, and a hands-on segment where students will be able to participate in the actual

CNST 293.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics may vary.

CNST 295.
PRACTICUM. (3)
Restriction: permission of Program Coordinator.
An individualized course of study within the psychomotor domain. 

CNST 299.
CO-OP EDUCATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Cooperative Education is a structured method of combining classroom-based education with practical work experience. A cooperative education experience, commonly known as a "co-op", provides academic credit for structured job experience. Cooperative Education is taking on new importance in helping people to make the school-to-work transition, service learning, and experiential learning initiatives. This course has a special focus on Veteran students.


COMM - COMMUNICATION 

COMM 1115.
INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Principles and concepts of various types of human communication including interpersonal, small group, organizational, public and mass communication. Two hours lecture, 1 hour lab.

COMM 1130.
PUBLIC SPEAKING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces the theory and fundamental principles of public speaking, emphasizing audience analysis, reasoning, the use of evidence, and effective delivery. Students will study principles of communication theory and rhetoric and apply them in the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches, including informative, persuasive, and impromptu speeches. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

COMM 1140.
INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700. 
Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or 1220 or 1240 or 1250 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or 2118 or UHON 202.
This course combines a theoretical foundation with practical applications. It provides an introduction to journalism, as well as an overview of the most common types of writing required in public relations, advertising and strategic communication.

COMM 1145.
SEX, LIES, AND FAKE NEWS: HOW TO USE MEDIA WISELY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Helps students recognize crucial distinctions in media content between truth and rumor, news and advertising, fact and opinion, bias and fairness. Emphasizes responsible and ethical decision making in consuming and producing media.

COMM 1150.
INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces students to the history, models, theories, concepts, and terminology of mass communication, focusing on various media and professions. The course will enable students to develop media literacy skills to interpret mass communication and understand the effects of media on society and their lives.

COMM 1155.
COMMUNICATIONS ACROSS CULTURES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introduction to communication among people from different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing intercultural relations. The class seeks to identify, honor and enhance the strengths of different cultural perspectives.

COMM 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)

COMM 2120.
INTERPERSONAL COMMUICATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides an introduction to the study of interpersonal communication. Students will examine the application of interpersonal communication in personal and professional relationships.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

COMM 2130.
MEDIA THEORIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduces students to a variety of media theories and models. Focuses on the key issues in media theory, including the nature of mass media, influences on human behavior, and the media as reflector and creator of society.

COMM 2135.
MEDIA ETHICS AND LAW. (3)
Prerequisite: COMM 1140.
Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or 1220 or 1240 or 1250 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or 2118 or UHON 202. 
The material will introduce you to the history of ethics and sources of our American legal system. We will examine how the law and ethical action are chosen and evolve through resolution of a dilemma - a choice between countervailing interests. Foundational principles, expressed in our charter documents, carry through those areas of law which are most critical to media: We'll examine fundamentals of law, of First Amendment, libel, privacy, open government, copyright and commercial speech. Consequently, this course's content will be relevant in every other Communication course you take between now and your completion of your degree program.

COMM 2140.
SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Explores the principles and practices of effective participation in small groups, with emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, organizational skills, role theory, conflict resolution, and creative decision-making methods. It combines a theoretical foundation with practical application to help students better understand the dynamics of group communication in both professional and social contexts.

COMM 2150.
COMMUNICATION FOR TEACHERS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will investigate and critically evaluation the influence of identity, communication, and culture on instruction, learning, engagement, classroom community, and the teacher-student relationship.

COMM 2185.
MULTIMEDIA AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or 1240 or 1250 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or 2118 or UHON 202.
Pre- or corequisite: COMM 2135.
This course is an exploration of visual images in mass media. It emphasizes the visual world and promotes visual literacy by helping students to decipher the language of pictures through studying history, technique and imagery. Students will work in the field and in the lab to create visual projects that communicate ideas and concepts clearly. This class will prepare students to work across technology platforms to produce publication quality multimedia stories and projects.

COMM 2190.
WRITING AND EDITING FOR MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or 1220 or 1240 or 1250 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or 2118 or UHON 202.
Pre- or corequisite: COMM 2135.
Continuation of COMM 1140. This course builds on the skills you have learned, focusing more deeply on the theory and practice of journalism in the digital age. Classes are in a lecture/discussion format, with emphasis on participation by students. We will practice strict adherence to deadlines, writing under pressure sometimes, rewriting, peer editing of stories, constructive criticism, coaching and teamwork. Students will hone skills in grammar, accuracy, attribution, interviews and story structure. We will also study what constitutes a compelling and well-reported, well-written news story — and the multimedia possibilities that go hand-in-hand with such stories.

COMM 2245.
WEB DESIGN. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces web page and web design concepts, basic HTML coding skills progressing to the use of Dreamweaver to design a website. Students will gain practical experience in the production of an electronic information delivery product. This course assumes that you already have basic skills as a journalist, and will focus on helping you transfer your skills to the online format. Competency with personal computers required.

COMM 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)


COMP - COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 2222.
FAIRY AND FOLK TALES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An exploration of fairy and folk tales from a variety of cultures. The course introduces methods of analysis while exploring historical and contemporary roles and interrelationships of the tales. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

COMP 224.
LITERARY QUESTIONS.
(3)
Examination of basic questions in comparative literature studies: themes, movements, modes, interaction of literature with other disciplines, etc.  Work will be comparative and reading list will represent a cross-section of Western European, American, Russian and Classical literatures. Titles will vary as content varies.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.


CS - COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 105L.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to Computer Programming is a gentle and fun introduction. Students will use a modern Integrated Development Environment to author small programs in a high-level language that do interesting things.

CS 108L.
COMPUTER SCIENCE FOR ALL: AN INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AND MODELING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course offers an introduction to computer science through modeling and simulation. Students will learn agent-based modeling of complex systems and see the applicability of computer science across fields. Course cannot apply to major in Computer Science or any other major in the School of Engineering.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

CS 150L
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to Computer Programming is a gentle and fun introduction. Students will use a modern Integrated Development Environment to author small programs in a high-level language that do interesting things. In this section of the course we will be using the Processing programming language, which was created at the MIT Media Lab in 2001 specifically to allow beginners to experience the creative potential of computer programming. We will cover the basic tools and look at some of the big ideas in computer science such as machine learning, computer graphics, animation, and data visualization. No previous programming experience is required.

CS 151L.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS FOR NON-MAJORS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introduction to the art of computing. Not intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving.

CS 152L.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS. (3)
Prerequisite: CS105L or 108L or 151L or ECE 131.
Introduction to the art of computing. The course objectives are understanding relationships between computation, problem solving, and programming using high-level languages.

CS 251L.
INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING. (3)
Prerequisite: CS 152L with a grade of "B-" or better.
An introduction to the methods underlying modern program development. Specific topics will include object-oriented design and the development of graphical user interfaces. Programming assignments will emphasize the use of objects implemented in standard libraries. Three lectures, 1 hr. recitation.

CS 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1512 or 1522 or 1430 or 1440. Lab fee.
Students will use personal computers in campus laboratories to learn use of a word processor, a spreadsheet and a database management program. The course will also cover access to the World Wide Web and other topics of current importance to business students. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science.


CT - COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 

CT 102.
INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS ON PC. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab Fee.
Students will comprehend the use of Hardware and the application of Software through lectures, readings, questions/answers, and research. The learning goal is for the student to be able to understand their needs in purchasing a computer and/or to maintain and use their own computers or UNM lab computers. Students will be given in class hands – on exercises to acquire skills for Creating, Editing, Saving and Printing Microsoft files. Students will use the basic concepts of File Management. Students will be assigned a research topic that will aid them in applying methods, and concepts of creating documents and the use of the Internet. Students will locate sources by searching electronic and traditional resources. Students will be able to identify components to design and create a professional final research documents. Students will demonstrate their mastery of the program goals by designing and creating a presentation that will integrate word processing, spreadsheets, and Internet applications

CT 106L.
MICROSOFT WORD. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
The student will be introduced to advanced word processing techniques using Microsoft Word. The class content involves document design and formatting as well as file management. Emphasis will be put on efficiency in application. The student will be able to apply and demonstrate effective use of the program by creating, organizing content, and collaborating Microsoft Word documents with other students.

CT 107L.
MICROSOFT EXCEL. (3)
Prerequisite: CT 102L or equivalent Windows experience. Lab fee.
This course is designed to teach spreadsheets and basics and beyond. It's perfect for you if you are a beginner or intermediate Excel user who needs to drastically increase your Excel skills to impress your boss, get a raise or even land a new job. Everything in the course is taught step-by-step in an easy, stress-free way. In the Introduction to Microsoft Excel 2016 course, students will create and edit basic worksheets and workbooks. This course is designed for students who want to gain the necessary skills to create, edit, format, and print basic Microsoft Excel 2016 worksheets. In addition, the student will work with formulas and functions, edit charts, format, organize and gather data for spreadsheets.

CT 108L.
INTRO TO MICROSOFT POWERPOINT. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
Presentation software used to graphically present information in slides such as a presentation on a new product or sales trend. Learning PowerPoint starts with basics. Students will become familiar with PowerPoint screens and the various screen elements. Students will then learn the fundamentals of creating effective multimedia presentations. By the end of the course students will create their own presentations using their own information.

CT 109L.
ADOBE INDESIGN I – INDESIGN CC. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
A powerful tool for creating everything from PDFs to infographics and everything in between. Adobe InDesign course is an activity-based that teaches design and layout techniques for producing high quality documents for print and on-screen delivery. Each activity contains a small task within so students are learning and refining their skills as they complete each task. Each activity also contains student guides to use in order to learn the technical skills required to complete each task. Students are introduced to the basics of the Adobe InDesign interface by learning how to set up a new document, import files, work with text, use alignment tools, and manage colors.

CT 110L.
ADOBE PHOTOSHOP I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud- Students create and modify various computer- generated "raster image" documents. The course content includes photography, using layers and color correction, as well as the preparation of images for electronic publications, printing, multimedia and web pages.  In this course, the student will learn the basics of using Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud.

CT 111L.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND DRAFTING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
This entry-level course is intended for the technician or draftsperson interested in the use of CADD in an engineering environment. The course will acquaint the student with the AutoCAD electronic drafting program for IBM- PC’s and address basic techniques associated with Architectural Desktop. The student will be familiarized with basic aspects of CADD from program initiation through hard copy output (plotting) of rudimentary AutoCAD drawings.

CT 113L.
MULTI-MEDIA I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
The student will learn nonlinear editing and multimedia publishing using Adobe Premiere Pro CC to produce presentations combining sound, video, and text for a variety of output mediums. The content of the course covers audio, editing, image capturing and presentation design. Topics areas covered are: Configuring project settings, Capturing and importing source clips, Creating and editing sequences, applying effects and transitions, mixing audio, superimposing composing clips, creating titles and producing outputs.

CT 114L.
INTRODUCTION TO WWW PUBLISHING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
The course introduces students to producing HTML pages for publication on the Internet. Students will gain experience in browsing the World Wide Web as well as designing, writing, and maintaining web pages. Content includes HTML, links and URLs, images, sound, and video.

CT 115L.
ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
Adobe Illustrator CC is an application that helps anyone achieve their creative vision using professional graphic design tools. In this course, you’ll learn how to use Illustrator to create artwork more efficiently for print, web, and digital video publications. You’ll follow step-by-step instructions using Adobe Classroom in a book to create and combine shapes, choose your colors, and add text for a professional-looking result.

CT 116L.
FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAPHIC DESIGN. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
This is a core class which allows the student to understand the basic visual dynamics of Graphic Design. The emphasis of this class is to understand the core principals of design aesthetics and processes of two and three-dimensional design. Areas to be covered include, but are not limited to: Visual Fundamentals (and Language), Creative Brainstorming and Research, Grid and Layouts, Typography, Color Theory, an abbreviated History of Design, Print Fundamentals and Basic Web Design, and an introduction to the Adobe Suite Tools, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver.

CT 125.
INTRO TO MACINTOSH. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
In this course, the student will learn the basics of using the Macintosh. Intro to Macintosh teaches students the basics on a computer. We begin by covering the desktop, folder management and move on to use and integrate data between word processors and spreadsheets and presentation applications. In addition, the students will become familiar with the vocabulary associated with computer concepts. We will cover basic internet searching, google capabilities, burning disks and basic Photoshop for email photo attachments. The students get hands-on training with the Mac's user-friendly operating system. The student will learn the basics of file management, navigating the Finder, setting up the Dock, customizing preferences, creating and saving files and backing up your computer and explore the uses and features of the ever-popular iLife programs.

CT 130L.
OFFICE 365. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
The course will concentrate on Office 365 MS Online portal. Word, (Word processing), Excel (spreadsheets) and PowerPoint (business presentation). In addition, we will be discussing and working with collaboration using Outlook (mail), Calendar, tasks, OneDrive, One Note, Sway and SharePoint.

CT 155L.
ADOBE DIGITAL PUBLISHING SUITE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
The Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) is a comprehensive curriculum. This curriculum has been written specifically for teaching Digital Publishing Suite in a secondary or post-secondary education setting. The curriculum has been prepared with graphic design students in mind. However, it can be used with students in Journalism, Photography, and related fields. (DPS) gives design students an opportunity to go beyond print and learn to design for mobile devices. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to digital publishing on mobile devices using DPS. The emphasis is to help students understand that DPS provides an entire “ecosystem” for creating, viewing, distributing, and monetizing content, and analyzing user behavior.

CT 160L.
ADOBE ACROBAT PRO. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
The Portable Document Format, PDF, is an important document format that allows users to create secure documents that can be viewed in any device or operating system. This class will introduce students to PDFs, and the Adobe Acrobat workspace, and how to create PDFs, use the tools and created an electronic portfolio. At the conclusion of the course, the student will be introduced to PDF (Portable Document Format) and able to discuss the uses and advantages of using the PDF format. Some things that will be discussed include: Document security, Version control, Compression options, Viewable regardless of hardware, software, or operating system. In addition, the class will address: preserving document formatting, user interface, terminology, and basic panels in Acrobat. To conclude the student will create a PDF portfolio.

CT 175L.
PLANNING AND DESIGNING WEBSITES. (3)
Prerequisites CT 110 and 170. 
Corequisite: CT 114. Lab fee.
The course introduces students to producing World Wide Web pages for publication on the Internet using the computer. Students will gain experience in browsing the World Wide Web as well as designing, writing, and maintaining web pages. Content includes all the different aspects of Web Design, how the internet works, best practices in web design. After completing this course student should have the fundamental concepts required to the construction of a successful website. Students will receive information on processes involved in creating and publishing web pages. Students will learn the fundamentals of designing a successful website, including planning to usability and marketing. By the end of the course students will have a thorough understanding of design aesthetics, user experience, web terminology, and preparation for web site construction. Students will also be introduced to server technologies and coding languages necessary for web site publication.

CT 192.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.

CT 193
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.

CT 195L.
DIRECTED STUDIES/GRAPHIC DESIGN. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
This is a class for experienced students pursuing a Digital Graphic Design certificate. Directed Studies Graphic Design was created to give students, that need to complete classes that are full or that have limited class enrollment a chance to fulfill their certificate requirement. The class will focus on using Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator or Premiere software.

CT 207L.
QUICKBOOKS. (3)
Prerequisite: CT 102L or equivalent Window experience. Lab fee.
QuickBooks Pro is the most popular personal and business accounting program in the country. Knowledge of this program can give students command of their personal and business data, along with job and career possibilities. This introductory course includes setting up a new company and chart of accounts, recording transactions with customers, vendors and employees; managing lists, running reports and customizing them; changing forms and generating letters.

CT 216L.
DIRECTED STUDIES/MULTIMEDIA. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.  Lab fee.
This seminar will be available to students focusing on Digital Graphic Design certificates. This course will be offered to the student a maximum of two times for a total amount of 6 credits. Directed Studies Multimedia is created to give students, that needs to take classes that are full or under class enrollment a chance to fulfill their certificate requirements. Students will learn multimedia publishing using the Macintosh computer to produce presentations combining audio, video, and text for a variety of output mediums. The content course covers sound editing, image capturing and presentation design.

CT 292.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.

CT 293.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.


DANC - DANCE 

DANC 1110.
DANCE APPRECIATION.
(3, may be repeated once Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course Fee.
This course introduces the student to the diverse elements that make up the world of dance, including a broad historic overview, roles of the dancer, choreographer and audience, and the evolution of the major genres. Students will learn the fundamentals of dance technique, dance history, and a variety of dance aesthetics. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

DANC 1140.
FLAMENCO I.
(3, may be repeated twice Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course Fee.
This course introduces the student to the art of flamenco and its cultural features and significance. Students will learn the fundamentals of this art form and introductory techniques and skills, which may include handwork, footwork, postures, and specific dances.

DANC 1150.
MODERN DANCE I.
(3, may be repeated twice Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course Fee.
Modern dance techniques and styles. Students are introduced to proper warm-up techniques, body alignment, control and flexibility. Students work with various rhythms and combinations of movements. The course emphasizes dance technique and creative experience. The history, terminology and philosophy of modern dance are also discussed.

DANC 1160.
JAZZ I.
(3, may be repeated twice Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course Fee.
This course is for students with a basic knowledge of dance technique. They work to attain muscle control and strength as well as increased flexibility. Further awareness of proper body alignment for injury prevention is emphasized. Jazz choreography, style and terminology are taught at a secondary level.

DANC 170.
HIP HOP I.
(3, may be repeated three times Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course Fee.
An introduction to Hip Hop, its movement, style and culture. 

DANC 295.
SPECIAL TOPICS IN DANCE. (3, may
be repeated four times Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course Fee.
Lecture courses and workshops on various topics in dance. 


DMA - DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS 

 

DMA 102.
DIGITAL FOUNDATIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The Media Industry in New Mexico is booming! This course offers a “hands-on” introduction to many of the skills required to succeed as a media entrepreneur. This is the first course of a two-year Associates Degree in Digital Media Arts.  This course is an introduction to a range of skills needed to succeed in the media industry.  The course will guide students through the five stages of production enabling completion of a story idea from start to finish.  Students in this course will work with brainstorms, scripts, storyboards, camera gear, lights, microphones and external drives, in a fully equipped adobe suite editing lab.   

DMA 120
INTRODUCTION TO TV AND FILM PRODUCTION. (3)
This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the basics in producing short films and documentaries. Students will learn hands on by using and experimenting with equipment.

DMA 125.
INTRODUCTION TO POST-PRODUCTION EDITING. (3)
This is a comprehensive introduction to the basics of editing short films and documentaries. Students will work with post-production software like Final Cut X for editing. 

DMA 130.
CINEMATOGRAPHY. (3)
Prerequisite: 120 and 125.
Introduces students to the world of cinematography. Students will learn about different cameras and lighting, scene study, shooting and editing scenes and casting; all the techniques that comprise the making of motion pictures. 

DMA 135.
SHORT FILM PRODUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: 120 and 125.
Students will learn the basics of pre-production to include lighting, casting, shooting and editing as it applies to short film production. 

DMA 145.
DUCMENTARY FILM PRODUCTION. (3)
Students will learn the basics of documentary films and genres using scriptwriting, cameras and lighting, to shooting and editing as it applies to documentary film production.

DMA 165.
INTRO DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS I PHOTOSHOP. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The course introduces students to computer graphics on the Macintosh computer using the Adobe Suites Software or alternatives such as Gimp or Krita. Students will create, modify, and prepare various computer-generated documents. Course focuses on producing digital artwork. This course is taught in conjunction with the multimedia course and many works are interrelated.

DMA 166.
DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS II: ILLUSTRATOR. (3)
Prerequisite: DMA 101 and (CT125 or C T 122). (Previously CT 105LT or CT 120LT).
This course is an introduction to the computer as an image-making device using vector-imaging software (Adobe Illustrator). It includes the creation and manipulation of digital imagery derived from traditional graphic design, including typography and illustration graphics. Students will design logo art and other projects aimed for printed and screen display. 

DMA 193.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.

DMA 193L.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.

DMA 220.
SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING TOOLS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will teach students how to create and maintain a social media presence for business. Students will learn to use social media and content marketing to grow a business and engage with customers.

DMA 270.
CAPSTONE: PORTFOLIO PRACTICUM. (3)

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to concentrate on a specific portfolio project. Students will develop a portfolio helpful for an entry-level position in digital media. Restriction: permission of instructor.

DMA 293.
TOPICS. (1-3)
Topics will vary.


ECED - EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

ECED 1110.
CHILD GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT, AND LEARNING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, prenatal through age eight, provides students with the theoretical foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals. The course includes knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all domains of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive and language. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development and learning is emphasized.

ECED 1115.
HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION. (2)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well-being sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for indoor and outdoor learning environments for young children. The course examines the many scheduling factors that are important for children’s total development, healthy nutrition, physical activity, and rest.

ECED 1120.
GUIDING YOUNG CHILDREN. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical applications of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Strategies for preventing challenging behaviors through the use of environment, routines and schedule will be presented Emphasis is placed on helping children become self- responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners and including families as part of the guidance approach.

ECED 1125.
ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN AND EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation of typically and non-typically developing children. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation instruments to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process.

ECED 1130.
FAMILY AND COMMUNITY COLLABORATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This beginning course examines the involvement of families and communities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with families in early childhood settings is discussed. Families’ goals and desires for their children will be supported through culturally responsive strategies.

ECED 2110.
PROFESSIONALISM. (2)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.

ECED 2115.
INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND READING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s oral language development, phonemic awareness, and literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. Instructional approaches and theory-based and research based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented.

ECED 2120.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT THROUGH PLAY: BIRTH THROUGH AGE 4 (PREK). (3)
Co-requisite: 2121
The beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized.

ECED 2121.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT THROUGH PLAY: BITH THROUGH AGE 4 (PREK) PRACTICUM. (2)
Prerequisite: 1110.
Co-requisite: 2120
The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized.

ECED 2130.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION: AGE 3 (PRE K) THROUGH GRADE 3. (3)
Corequisite: 2131.
The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized.

ECED 2131.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION: AGE 3 (PREK) THROUGH GRADE 3 PRACTICUM. (2)
Prerequisite: 1110.
Corequisite: 2130.
The field-based component of this course will provide experiences that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included.

ECED 2240.
INFANT TODDLER GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: PRENATAL TO AGE 3
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None
Provides both basic knowledge of typically and atypically developing young children from the prenatal period to 36 months and a foundational understanding for the promotion of the health, well- being and development of all infants and toddlers within the context of family, community and cultural environments. The course examines infancy and toddlerhood with an emphasis on the interrelationship of cognitive, physical, social and emotional development, mental health and early parent-child relationships. 


ECME - EARLY CHILDHOOD MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

ECME 193.
FOUNDATIONS/EARLY CARE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed for developing professionals in the field of early care, education, and family support, those “new to the field” as well as those already employed, but with no formal training. Course work will provide an initial introduction to the seven competency areas of early childhood education. Students will have an opportunity to observe and participate for ten hours in a local early care and educational setting. Upon successful completion of this course students will be awarded an Entry Level New Mexico Certificate.


ECON - ECONOMICS 

ECON 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)

ECON 2110.
MACROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Macroeconomics is the study of national and global economies. Topics include output, unemployment and inflation; and how they are affected by financial systems, fiscal and monetary policies. Prerequisite for most upper-division courses.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 2120.
MICROECONOMICS PRINCIPLES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will provide a broad overview of microeconomics. Microeconomics is the study of issues specific to households, firms, or industries with an emphasis on the role of markets. Topics discussed will include household and firm behavior, demand and supply, government intervention, market structures, and the efficient allocation of resources. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ECON 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)

EDUC - EDUCATION 

EDUC 1120.
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to the historical, philosophical, sociological foundations of education, current trends, and issues in education; especially as it relates to a multicultural environment. Students will use those foundations to develop effective strategies related to problems, issues and responsibilities in the field of education. A field component at an educational site is required.

EDUC 1125.
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION IN NEW MEXICO. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An exploration of contemporary issues around diversity, culture, and education in New Mexico. The course is of special interest to students considering a teaching career. Projects in schools and/or community sites are part of requirements.

EDUC 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)

EDUC 291.
PROBLEMS
. (1-3 to a maximum of 3
Δ)

EDUC 296.
INTERNSHIP
. (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

EDUC 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


EMS -EMERGENCY MEDICINE 

EMS 106.
EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This 72-hour course is designed specifically for personnel who are first at the scene of an accident or emergency. This course offers a foundation for entry-level and advanced EMS courses.

EMS 113.
EMT-BASIC. (8)
Corequisite: 142.
Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lecture instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing.

EMS 120.
INTRODUCTION TO EMS SYSTEM. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Covers the history of emergency medical services and the development of EMS systems and current trends and issues in EMS. Ideal for students considering a career in EMS.

EMS 142.
EMT-BASIC LAB. (2)
Corequisite: EMS 113.
Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing.

EMS 143.
EMT-INTERMEDIATE LAB. (1)
Prerequisite: EMS 113 and 142.
Corequisite: 180. Lab Fee.
Restriction: program permission.
Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT- Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology.

EMS 151.
EMT-1 CLINICAL AND FIELD EXPERIENCE. (2)
Prerequisite: EMS 113 and 142.
Corequisite: 143 and 180.
Restriction: program permission.
Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate field and clinical training, including emergency department and prehospital experience.

EMS 180.
EMT-INTERMEDIATE. (5)
Prerequisite: EMS 113 and 142.,
Corequisite: 143.
Restriction: program permission.
Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT- Intermediate lecture content, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology.

EMS 193.
EMERGENCY MEDICINE TOPICS
. (1-3, no limit Δ)

ENGL - ENGLISH 

ENGL 1110.
COMPOSITION I. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT English =16-25 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =450-659 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Writing =>279.
Covers Composition I: Stretch I and II in one semester. In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts. They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers, and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing. (EPW). Credit for both this course and ENGL 1110X may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

ENGL 1110X-1110Y.
COMPOSITION I: STRETCH I AND II. (3)
Students with ACT English <16 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing <450 or Next Generation ACCUPLACER Writing <279 will begin their English Composition Sequence with ENGL 1110X.
Prerequisite for 1110Y: 1110X.
Restriction for 1110X: permission of department.
First and second semester of Composition I stretch sequence. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. These are the first and second courses in a two-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for ENGL 1110, all courses in this sequence (ENGL 1110X, ENGL 1110Y) must be taken and passed. Credit for both ENGL 1110X and ENGL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program.
 
ENGL 1110Z.
ENHANCED COMPOSITION. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT English =15-18 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =430-490 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills =93-108.
Restriction: permission of department.
Covers Composition I Stretch I and II in one semester with a 1 credit hour lab. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. Credit not allowed for both (1110Z and 1110) or (1110Z and 1110Y).  

ENGL 1120.
COMPOSITION II. (3)
Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690.
In this course, students will explore argument in multiple genres. Research and writing practices emphasize summary, analysis, evaluation, and integration of secondary sources. Students will analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading, writing, and research. Students will sharpen their understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. The emphasis of this course will be on research methods. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

ENGL 1410.
INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
In this course, students will examine a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will identify common literary elements in each genre, understanding how specific elements influence meaning. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

ENGL 1710.
GREEK MYTHOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English.

ENGL 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ) 

ENGL 206.
TOPICS IN POPULAR LITERATURE.
(3, no limit Δ)
Reading and analysis of popular literary forms such as the spy novel, the detective novel, science fiction, best-sellers and fantasy.

ENGL 2110.
TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course surveys traditional grammar, introducing linguistic terminology and methods for identifying and understanding parts of speech, parts of sentences and basic sentence patterns. The course presents terminology and methods designed to increase the student’s understanding of the structure of the language.

ENGL 2120.
INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION. (3, may be
repeated once Δ)
Prerequisite:  ENGL 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.
This course builds upon and refines the writing skills acquired in previous writing courses, with a focus on non-fiction prose. Research, composition, exposition and presentation abilities will be practiced and developed. Through analysis and revision, students will develop strategies to improve the versatility and impact of their writing. Course topics and emphases may vary by section. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

ENGL 2210.
TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.
This course will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

ENGL 2220.
INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing=>700
Introductory course in the professional writing concentration. Study of technical writing, public information and public relations writing and freelance nonfiction writing. 

ENGL 2240.
INTRODUCTION TO STUDIES IN ENGLISH. (1)
Prerequisite: ENGL 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z.
This course brings together students majoring in English. It is a required course and must be taken before embarking on the major coursework. Students are introduced to the subfields of rhetoric and professional writing; creative writing; literary studies; and critical theory and cultural studies. Students will be introduced to the life of the department through class visits with faculty members, attendance at departmental events, and a variety of readings and discussions. Some class sessions will include conversations about employment or opportunities for graduate school. The final task will be to craft a letter of intent documenting an intended course of study and future goals.

ENGL 2310.
INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690.
This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this "workshop" course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres.

ENGL 2510.
ANALYSIS OF LITERATURE. (3)
Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.
This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing applied to literary techniques, conventions, and themes. Students will learn how to write focused literary analyses, demonstrating their understanding of biographical, critical, cultural, and historical contexts of various writers and genres. Students will also learn proper documentation, as well as other skills, such as quoting, paraphrasing, and integrating sources, both primary and secondary.

ENGL 2540.
INTRODUCTION TO CHICANA/O LITERATURES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course examines a variety of literary genres to explore the historical development of Chicano/a social and literary identities. This survey offers an overview of the history of Chicano/a literature, introducing the major trends and placing them into an historical framework.

ENGL 2560.
SURVEY OF NATIVE LITERATURES AND RHETORICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce students to the literature produced by Native American authors as well as explore issues relevant to the study of Native American literature. The course will also introduce the basic elements of literary analysis.

ENGL 2610.
AMERICAN LITERATURE I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course surveys American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand the origins of American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to early American culture. 

ENGL 2620.
AMERICAN LITERATURE I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course surveys American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to the contemporary period. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to American culture. 

ENGL 2630.
BRITISH LITERATURE I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course offers a study of British literature from its origins in Old English to the 18th century. This survey covers specific literary works—essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. 

ENGL 2640.
BRITISH LITERATURE II. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course offers a study of British literature from the 18th century to the present. This survey covers specific literary works—short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. 

ENGL 2650.
WORLD LITERATURES I: (ANCIENT WORLD THROUGH THE 16TH CENTURY). (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

ENGL 2660.
WORLD LITERATURES II: (17TH CENTURY THROUGH THE PRESENT). (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from the 1600s to the present. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

ENGL 2670.
AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The course introduces students to the African American classics of the slavery era. Daily experiences of the characters in these books become the basis for discussing race, class, gender, revolt, freedom, peace and humanity. 

ENGL 2993.
WORKSHOP.
(1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Various topics in literature, language, and writing.

ENGL 2996.
TOPICS.
(3, may be repeated twice Δ)


ENTR - ENTREPRENEURSHIP 

ENTR 1110.
ENTREPRENEURSHIP. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A survey course that examines topics including: the entrepreneurial process and economy, the entrepreneur's profile and characteristics, youth and social entrepreneurship.


ENVS - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

ENVS 1130.
THE BLUE PLANET. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1130L.
To understand global change and environmental concerns, this course weaves together an understanding of Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere and oceans and how ecosystems are linked to the physical environment. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

ENVS 1130L.
THE BLUE PLANET LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: 1130.
In this course, students will often work together to collect data and students are encouraged to discuss their observations and ideas, but students are expected to write their own answers in their own words on their worksheets. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences. 


FCST - FAMILY STUDIES 

FCST 1120.
INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY AND CHILD STUDIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introduction to the profession of Family Studies including content areas, community agencies and career opportunities.

FCST 2130.
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides insights into contemporary marriage and family situations. Focus is on decision-making for better understanding of families and the broader society.


FDMA - FILM AND DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS 

FDMA 1210.
DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course fee.
An introduction to digital video production. Students learn camera operation, lights and audio equipment. Hands-on production is completed in the studio and on location.

FDMA 1520.
INTRODUCTION TO FILM AND DIGITAL MEDIA. (3)
Prerequisite: FDMA 1210.
This course is designed to provide students with a survey of the histories, innovative concepts, and creative possibilities of digital media. Within both the lecture hall and the studio lab, students will consider a wide variety of digital media processes and applications. Additionally, students will learn fundamental skills in teamwork, storytelling, and design. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

FDMA 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-3, no limit Δ)

FDMA 2110.
INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course fee.
This course introduces students to the fundamentals in film history, criticism, and theory. Though viewing and analysis of a variety of narrative, documentary, and experimental films, students will advance their understanding of key issues in filmic representation and aesthetics. A range of approaches will be employed in understanding the aesthetic and cultural significance of the medium, including feminism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, and modernism. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

FDMA 2195.
BEYOND HOLLYWOOD. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course fee.
This course concentrates on the representation of children and adolescents in world cinema. The portrayal of children throughout world cinema has a long and rich complex history, which has been primarily shaped by family and national structures. Through film screenings, readings, and discussions class will center on the exploration of what it means to look at children and what cultural baggage are their bodies asked to carry. Also, what impact do national and global politics have on the lives of children? Through the establishment and use of basic vocabulary and analytic methodologies of film studies, larger theoretical and practical questions about how cinema functions as a cultural and ideological force, especially how it helps to construct ideas about the family, the nation, and national identities will be addressed. Class screenings will cover a breadth of children and adolescents in world cinema but readings, discussions, and outside film viewings will provide a more comprehensive overall picture.

FDMA 2280.
TOPICS IN VIDEOMAKING
. (3, may be repeated once Δ)
Prerequisite: FDMA 1210. Course fee.
These courses strengthen students’ skills in video technology while helping them write, direct, and edit video projects that begin to reflect a personal, artistic vision. 

FDMA 2286.
ACTIVATING DIGITAL SPACE. (3)
Prerequisite: FDMA 1210.
This class introduces students to the techniques of dramatic narrative and how those techniques can inform a visual grammar where form follows function.

FDMA 2520.
INTRODUCTION TO CINEMATOGRAPHY.
Prerequisite: FDMA 2525.
The Director of Photography (or Cinematographer), in close collaboration with the Director and Production Designer, helps determine the look of a film. This course is designed to introduce students to the technical and aesthetic fundamentals of creating, developing, and collaborating on the visual elements of storytelling, using camera framing, lensing, and lighting fundamentals such as shadows, light and color.

FDMA 2525.
VIDEO PRODUCTION II
. (3)
Prerequisite: 1210.
An in-depth exploration of digital video production, including camera, lighting and sound production techniques for studio and field production. This class will help the filmmaker visualize and execute a digital film in a real-world team environment.

FDMA 2530.
INTRODUCTION TO 3D MODELING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce 3D modeling methods and current practices. Students will learn preliminary and detailed modeling techniques using industry standard software. Methods will emphasize formal and functional aspects of modeling as they apply to mechanical, organic, and sculpted topology for application in animation, games, and information media.

FDMA 2610.
DIRECTING I. (3)
Prerequisite: FDMA 1210.
Introduction to the creative process of a film director. Students will participate in hands-on workshops and develop stories for motion media, create screenplays and work with actors in short scenes using current technologies in film, television and web-based media production.

FDMA 2714.
INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will be entirely focused on laying the foundation of animation around the twelve principles of animation as defined by Disney master animators Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston.

FDMA 2768.
INTRODUCTION TO GAME DEVELOPMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: CS 105L or 152L
In tandem with innovations of modern computing machines, people have been devising ways to "play" with these systems through programming games on these devices. Video games have matured into an expressive medium rooted in using algorithms as the means for constructing interactive experiences. Building these games requires an understanding on principles of interactive design, computer science, and storytelling.

FDMA 2996.
TOPICS. 
(1-6, no limit Δ)

FDMA 2999.
SPECIAL PROJECTS: CAPSTONE: PORTFOLIO-PRACTICUM. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to concentrate on a specific portfolio project. Students will develop a portfolio helpful for an entry-level position in digital media and/or an application towards the AASDMA degree. A professional-level project will be required of all Digital Media Arts majors to demonstrate specific strengths in digital photography, graphic and web design, digital animation, video and film, or game art and animation (and the like). Each student will complete the portfolio project via a presentation, live website and/or reel. This course can also be used as a practicum course for internships and/or field-related work/jobs. This is a required course for the DMA Associates Degree


FORS - FORESTRY 

FORS 2020.
TERESTRIAL ECOLOGY. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Students will be exposed to classic ecology concepts through lecture and readings. Students will demonstrate integration and mastery of these concepts through application to a case study on North American bison. In addition, students will collect data in the field on five of New Mexico’s naturally occurring biomes. Students will analyze this data to quantitatively demonstrate the differences in vegetation and other abiotic/biotic factors between these biomes. These results will be presented in posters to the UNM-Taos community. Lastly, students will also learn the Grinnell Method for documenting field observations.

FORS 2030.
WATER RESOURCES. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Where there is fresh, clean water there is life! This life includes plants that provide food, shelter and habitat to a diversity of wildlife. Humans need water, too. Not just to stay alive, but to wash our clothes, water our crops, mix our concrete, build our shopping malls, mine the lithium in our phones, cool our radioactive fuel rods, and flush our toilets. There are more and more humans, using more and more water. Can we learn to coexist with the other life that depends on it by applying water conservation (use less and re-use more)? Or, are we destined –and, possibly doomed –to have to take more and more water for ourselves?


FREN - FRENCH

FREN 1110.
FRENCH I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Intended for students with no previous exposure to French, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills aiming toward the ACTFL novice-high level. This is an introductory course designed to teach the student to communicate in French in everyday situations and to develop an understanding of French and Francophone cultures through the identification of cultural products and practices, of cultural perspectives, and the ability to function at a survival level in an authentic cultural content. This course will also develop the student’s sense of personal and social responsibility through the identification of social issues. Conducted in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 1150 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

FREN 1120.
FRENCH II. (3)
A continuation of 1110, students will develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first semester, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-low level. This course is designed to increase student fluency in French as applied to everyday situations. Students will also learn to recognize and understand various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, identifying common cultural patterns, describing basic cultural viewpoints, and further developing their sense of personal and social responsibility through the investigation of cultural issues. Conducted in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 1150 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.


FYEX - FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE 

FYEX 1010.
FOUNDATIONAL MATH. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics courses by strengthening key mathematical concepts. It addresses the transition from high school to college and incorporates strategies needed for problem solving.

FYEX 1020.
MATH LEARNING STRATEGIES
. (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed to help increase awareness of math-based structures in day-to-day life, interpret and evaluate information presented in graphical and visual formats, and use problem-solving tools and concepts to analyze information and arguments. 

FYEX 1030.
CRITICAL TEXT ANALYSIS. (1-3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course presents the reading process including study reading, critical thinking and analysis. It addresses the transition from high school to college and incorporates strategies needed for problem solving.

FYEX 1110.
SEM: FIRST YEAR SEMINAR
. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed to help students achieve greater success in college and in life. Students will learn many proven strategies for creating greater academic, professional, and personal success. Topics may include career exploration, time management, study and test-taking strategies to adapt to different learning environments, interpersonal relationships, wellness management, financial literacy, and campus and community resources.


GNST - GENERAL STUDIES 

GNST 293.
TOPICS. (1-3 credits)

GEOG - GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 1115.
MAPS AND GISCIENCE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Maps are tools for communication. Will explore scale; projections; symbolization; generalization; alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS, remote sensing, multimedia and animated maps.

GEOG 1115L.
MAPS AND GISCIENCE LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Students gain field and laboratory experience in geographic data collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Topics include map reading, spatial sampling and statistics, the global position system (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and cartography.

GEOG 1150.
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIORNMENTAL STUDIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Survey of environmental issues related to the degradation of land, air and water resources.

GEOG 1160.
HOME PLANET: LAND, WATER AND LIFE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces the physical elements of world geography through the study of climate and weather, vegetation, soils, plate tectonics, and the various types of landforms as well as the environmental cycles and the distributions of these components and their significance to humans. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOG 1160L.
HOME PLANET LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: GEOL 1160.
Exercises designed to complement 1160. Applied problems in the spatial processes of the physical environment. Map construction and reading, weather and climatic analysis, classification of vegetative and soil associations, landform distribution analysis. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOG 1165.
PEOPLE AND PLACE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
By focusing on issues of globalization, this course provides an overview of core concepts from human geography, including systematic analyses of economic, political, and cultural geography. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

GEOG 1175.
WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The regional geography of the world. Both physical and human aspects are studied along with current economic and political problems. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

GEOG 1970.
WORLD OF BEER. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course examines and the complex and fascinating world of beer. It examines social and ecological influences on its development and explores the functions of beer from historical, economic, cultural, environmental and physical viewpoints.

GEOG 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

GEOG 2115.
INFORMATION DESIGN IN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Students learn to communicate complex, scientific data by designing infographics, and to analyze infographics as storytelling devices. This course builds information literacy and communication skills in an increasingly data-driven society.

GEOG 217.
ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A look at the social, ethical, and environmental impacts of energy use both now and through history. A survey of renewable energy and conservation and their impact on environmental and social systems.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

GEOG 254.
INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN SOCITY I: SOCIAL SCIENCES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to Latin American Studies through the social sciences examines major themes including colonialism, agrarian transformation, urbanization, demographics, family, human rights, inequalities, violence, and social movements. Emphasis given to insights gained from making interdisciplinary connections.

GEOG 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


GEOL - GEOLOGY 

GEOL 1110.
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: Students are encouraged but not required to enroll concurrently in 1110L.
This course is an introduction to our dynamic Earth, introducing students to the materials that make up Earth (rocks and minerals) and the processes that create and modify the features of our planet. The course will help students learn how mountains are formed, how volcanoes erupt, where earthquakes occur, and how water, wind, and ice can shape the landscape. Students will also develop a basic understanding of the ways humans have altered the planet including our impact on natural resources and global climate change. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOL 1110L.
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. (1)
Pre or corequisite: GEOL 1110
Students will learn to identify rocks and minerals in hand samples, work with topographic maps, geologic maps, and geologic cross-sections, and apply stratigraphic principles to explore geologic time. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOL 1140.
GEOLOGICAL DISASTERS. (3)

Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will incorporate an overview of the geological processes that result in natural disasters and the input humans have on the amplification or mitigation of these natural disasters. We will examine past catastrophes and discuss the probability of such disasters occurring again. Hazards investigated will include, but not be limited to earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, hurricanes, floods, landslides, and astronomical events such as meteor and comet collisions with Earth. We will investigate the data obtained from recent disasters and explore the costs in human and economic terms.

GEOL 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit
Δ)

GEOL 2110C.
HISTORICAL GEOLOGY LECTURE AND LABORATORY. (4)
Prerequisite: GEOL 1110 or ENVS 1130.
Pre- or corequisite: GEOL 1110L or ENVS 1130L.
Origin and history of the Earth including age of the planet and dating of rocks, changing configurations of oceans and continents as a result of plate tectonics, records of climate change, history of formation and erosion of mountain chains, origin and evolution of life and causes of extinction. Required field trip and lab exercises permit understanding of how Earth history is interpreted from the geologic rock record. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

GEOL 2130.
INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to Earth's atmosphere and the dynamic world of weather as it happens. Working with current meteorological data delivered via the Internet and coordinated with learning investigations keyed to the current weather; and via study of select archives.

GEOL 2140.
GEOLOGY OF NEW MEXICO. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is a tour of the geologic history and natural places of New Mexico. Students will explore the materials (rocks and minerals) that make up New Mexico and the processes that created and continue to shape our state. Students will learn about mountains, rivers and seas that have come and gone, and New Mexico’s rich fossil heritage. Students will discover where and why volcanoes erupted, and where natural resources are found and extracted.

GEOL 2430.
VOLCANOES!
Prerequisite: 1110 or ENVS 1130.
Types of volcanoes and eruption products, role of volcanism in planetary evolution, volcanoes as sources of geothermal energy and mineral deposits, volcanic hazards and disasters, environmental effects of volcanic eruptions.

GEOL 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)


HCDA - HEALTH CAREERS DENTAL ASSISTANT 

HCDA 101.
INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL ASSISTING. (3)
This course will introduce the student to four- handed dentistry to include: asepsis and OSHA recommendations related to general operative procedures, medical history, vital signs, and charting.

HCDA 110.
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. (3)
This course is a study and application of Professional Ethics in the dental field. We will focus on the diversities of civil and criminal law and how it is important to know the definitions of "due care" and examples of malpractice and torts.

HCDA 120.
PRE-CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING I. (4)
An introduction to four-handed dentistry including aseptic techniques, moisture control, local anesthesia, instrumentation, dental materials, and general operative.

HCDA 125.
PRE-CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING II. (4)
Lab fee.
A continuation of pre-clinical I with emphasis on four-handed techniques in six recognized specialties.

HCDA 130.
DENTAL RADIOLOGY. (3)
Instruction in the basic principles of radiation physics, and modern intra- and extra-oral dental radiographic techniques. It includes exposing radiographs, arrangement and care of darkroom equipment, composition and preparation of developing solutions, processing and mounting films. Radiation safety and protection guidelines will be emphasized.

HCDA 135.
UNM CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING. (3)
Clinical training/practicum/internship hours in a dental office.  Required amount of internship hours is 128 which should be divided into at least 2 dental offices.

HCDA 140.
PREVENTATIVE DENTISTRY/DENTAL EDUCATION. (3)
This course provides an overview of a complete dental record, obtaining vital signs, dx and tx planning, and emergencies common to the dental office settings. Students will gain knowledge in emergency drugs, allergic reactions and drug-related emergencies. Also emphasized are specific medical conditions related to treatment, management of medical emergencies, and pharmacology related to the dental practice.

HCDA 145.
CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting.

HCDA 155.
CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING II. (3)
Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting with an emphasis on refinement of chair side skills.

HCDA 164.
SEMINAR IN DENTAL ASSISTING. (3)
This unit is designed to instruct the student in the basic fundamentals of legal aspects in dentistry. It includes both didactic and clinical application.

HCDA 230.
DENTAL RADIOLOGY. (3)
Instruction in the basic principles of radiation physics, and modern intra- and extra- oral dental radiographic techniques. It includes exposing radiographs, arrangement and care of darkroom equipment, composition and preparation of developing solutions, processing and mounting films. Radiation safety and protection guidelines will be emphasized.

HCDA 235.
DENTAL ASSISTING NATIONAL BOARD PREPARATION. (2)
This course will focus on adding to and improving the Student’s skills and understanding of all aspects of chair side dental assisting, along with complementary laboratory and dental materials skills.

HCDA 240.
DENTAL EDUCATION. (3)
Various aspects of dental disease prevention will be covered. This will include coronal polishing of teeth, providing one-on-one oral hygiene instruction, the importance of nutrition, and the psychology of patient behavior.


HCHS - HEALTH CAREERS HEALTH SCIENCES 

HCHS 111.
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY. (3).
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introduction to terminology used in health careers. It will provide a basic knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and root words used in describing anatomical parts of the human body as well as general terms relating to disease processes.

HCHS 114.
CONCEPTS OF DISEASE TRANSMISSION. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee.
This course will introduce the student to the fundamental concepts and biological principles of disease-causing organisms. The function of disease producers and the ways in which humans can control such organisms will be discussed.

HCHS 125.
INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY. (3)|
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course presents the basic therapeutic actions of various types of commonly used drugs. Emphasis is placed on the classification of medications, therapeutic actions, adverse reactions, routes of administration and calculation of drug dosages and solutions.

HCHS 193.
TOPICS. (1-3 credits)

HCHS 200.
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY HEALTH SCIENCES. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for students in health sciences programs. Diseases and conditions studied will be examined from a conceptual basis and will be those of the greatest teaching value and importance.


HHHA - HOLISTIC HEALTH AND HEALING ARTS 

HHHA 101.
INTRO TO HEALING ARTS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This class grounds students in the foundation of Holistic Health and Healing Arts.

HHHA 102.
MEDITATION, CONSCIOUSNESS AND SELF-HEALING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Sean Murphy, author of the award-winning Zen chronicle One Bird, One Stone and other books, invites students to explore the deeply rejuvenating effects of meditation and mindfulness.

HHHA 103.
KUNDALINI YOGA. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Fundamentals of Kundalini Yoga, including exercise sets (Kriyas), breathing techniques (pranayama), and mental concentration and relaxation techniques; i.e. meditation. The focus is on strengthening the nervous system and balancing the endocrine glandular system.

HHHA 104.
HATHA YOGA. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Amber Burke, E-RYT 500, will guide students in a practice of fundamental and accessible asanas and discussions of philosophy and ethics through the lens of Patanjali's Yoga Sutras. Students will also lead practices and discussions of their choosing.

HHHA 105.
TAI CHI/ QIGONG. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Daniel Pretends Eagle, LMT, will be teaching meditative movements that restore vitality, improve balance, increase strength and promote the wellbeing of mind, body, and spirit.

HHHA 106.
INTRODUCTION TO MASSAGE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Daniel Pretends Eagle, LMT, will teach the fundamentals of bodywork, laying invaluable groundwork for future massage studies.

HHHA 110.
YOGA FOR WELLNESS. (3)
An asana (posture) course that combines traditional yoga postures with functional movements, like sitting, standing, and walking. Via a different anatomical focus each week, we will progress toward “wholeness". 

HHHA 116.
INTRODUCTION TO ORIENTAL MEDICINE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Dr. Lilly-Marie Blecher, a doctor of Oriental medicine and a naturopathic doctor, will illuminate the fundamentals of this ancient system of medicine which emphasizes the interconnectedness of the body and the world.

HHHA 117.
DREAMS, VISION, AND ARTMAKING/IMAGERY AS A HEALING TOOL. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Gary Cook, tenured Associate Professor of Art at UNM Taos, leads students on a journey of self-discovery through guided meditation. The images and intuition students tap into serve as fodder for their own creative work.

HHHA 118.
AYURVEDA. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Patrick Shaw, LMT, RMTI, will teach this class in the ancient Indian healing modality called "The Science of Life," guiding students to an awareness of their constitutions and toward a greater energetic balance.

HHHA 120.
YOGA STYLES AND SEQUENCES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Amber Burke leads this class exploring the different styles of yoga as well as ways of sequencing and cuing poses. Students show their understanding of class concepts through practice teaching.

HHHA 121.
YOGA FOR COMMON CONDITIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Amber Burke (RYT 500), HHHA and Yoga Program Coordinator, is offering a new class called Yoga for Common Conditions based on the forthcoming book she has co-written for Yoga International. The class will prepare future yoga teachers and/or interested yoga students to design classes for themselves and others that safely accommodate many underlying injuries and conditions.

HHHA 146.
REIKI HEALING I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Madrona Bourdeau, CPM-R, CST, will be teaching this introduction to energy work, helping students to develop their sensitivity and spiritual awareness while learning hands-on and intention-based techniques that encourage bodies to heal themselves. Class is face-to-face in Rio Grande Hall on Civic Plaza Drive in downtown Taos.

HHHA 147.
REIKI HEALING II. (3)
This course provides an overview of the energy system Reiki and review for students who already have Reiki I. Students will review the philosophy and process of Reiki as reintroduced through Dr. Mikao Usui and Hawayo Takata. Basic hand positions will be reviewed and practiced. Students will also explore their own levels of self- awareness through guided imagery exercises.  Students have the option of initiation for level II but must have the approval of the instructor. See the instructor for details. Students enrolled in level II will be given additional instruction throughout the semester. Level II is intended for students who are planning to develop a career/vocation as a Reiki practitioner. All students practice together during class.

HHHA 148.
INTRODUCTION TO HOMEOPATHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Dr. Angelika Maria Koch will cover the philosophical underpinnings and practical applications of homeopathy and delve into homeopathic remedies for common issues.

HHHA 149.
INTRODUCTION TO HERBOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Unveil the life-enhancing potential of herbs. Learn to identify herbs, their properties, and their uses.

HHHA 155.
INTEGRATIVE HEALTH COACHING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Are you a student or wellness professional who is interested in expanding your skills in the wellness niche and guiding others toward wellbeing? Dr. Angelika Maria Koch will elucidate the principles and concepts of integrated health coaching in this entirely-online course.

HHHA 201.
SACRED CEREMONY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
A transformational class which exposes students to a variety of healing ceremonies.

HHHA 202.
MEDITATION AND THE CREATIVE ARTS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Sean Murphy, author of the award-winning Zen chronicle One Bird, One Stone and other books, will help students access their creativity through Zen meditation and discussion.

HHHA 229.
LIFE GIVING SWORD. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed to provide an introduction and orientation to the basics of Aikido weapons practice through sword and staff work. With an emphasis on the healing and the way of the warrior.

HHHA 262.
YOGA & ANATOMY TRAINS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Dr. Kirstie Segarra, Structural Integrationist and Director of the Integrative Health and Medical Massage Program, will take students on a fascia-first approach to yoga anatomy in this class which includes both discussion and practice. The text is Thomas Myers' groundbreaking and detailed Anatomy Trains.

HHHA 263.
YOGA & PSYCHOLOGY OF CHAKRAS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Focusing on Anodea Judith's seminal Eastern Body, Western Mind, Amber Burke (E- RYT 500 and HHHA Coordinator) will lead this class which addresses energetics as well as the biomechanics and alignment of the body chakra by chakra. Students will show their mastery of the concepts covered through practice teaching and reflective written assignments.

HHHA 293.
TOPICS. (1- 3)


HIST - HISTORY 

HIST 1105.
MAKING HISTORY
. (3, may be repeated once Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
General introduction to history: how historians carry out research and develop interpretations about the past.

HIST 1110.
UNITED STATES HISTORY I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1120.
UNITED STATES HISTORY II. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from reconstruction to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1150.
WESTERN CIVILIZATION I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from ancient times to the early modern era. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1160.
WESTERN CIVILIZATION II. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from the early modern era to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1170.
SURVEY OF EARLY LATIN AMERICA. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from pre-Columbian times through independence. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1180.
MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The primary objective of this course is to serve as a survey of the history of Latin America from independence to the present. This course will explore the contributions of Indigenous peoples, Africans, and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential to the understanding of the history of Latin America within the context of world societies.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

HIST 1190.
MEDIEVAL EUROPE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce students to the history and culture of Medieval Europe. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of specific topics such as the growth of Christianity, feudalism, social conformity, and the responses of the people to the challenges of famine, disease, and warfare. For this purpose, the course is organized chronologically and topically.

HIST 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

HIST 2110.
SURVEY OF NEW MEXICO HISTORY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of New Mexico from the pre-Columbian times to the present day. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the 

HIST 2255.
TRADITIONAL EASTERN CIVILIZATIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course surveys nearly all of Asia (East, South, and West) from antiquity to approximately 1600 CE. The focus is on the development of three major civilizations: Chinese, South Asian, and Islamic. Topics with comparative potential include governing institutions, social structures, economies and trade, belief systems, and artistic expressions.

HIST 2256.
MODERN EASTERN CIVILIZATIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The emergence of modern Asia from the impact of western colonialism and imperialism to nationalism, modernization and revolution.

HIST 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


HLED - HEALTH EDUCATION 

HLED 1113.
AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID AND CPR. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Preparation in practice to meet needs and situations when basic first aid care is needed. Students eligible for standard first aid certification & CPR Certificate.

HLED 1220.
PERSONAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introduction to the major areas of information that help humans achieve, maintain, and promote positive health. Topics covered include nutrition, mental and physical health, drugs, human sexuality, prevention and control of diseases and injury, nutrition, and societal and environmental impacts on health.

HLED 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

HLED 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-3, no limit Δ) 


HMHV – HEALTH, MEDICINE AND HUMAN VALUES 

HMHV 1110.
SOCIAL CONTOURS OF HEALTH. (3)
Restriction: permission of instructor.
Seminar exploring ethnic, economic, demographic, and geographic variables impacting public health in New Mexico and the Southwest. Topics include access to health care; local alternatives to medical treatment; cultural definitions of health, illness, and death.

HMHV 1150.
FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE. (3)
Restriction: permission of instructor.
This course is designed for students transitioning from high school to college who plan on going into the life sciences with a special emphasis on medicine. The course takes an active learning approach that challenges you to apply your knowledge and work in small groups to solve real-world problems. The goal is to not only teach science, but to also train future scientists and medical doctors who will become life-long learners and leaders in their discipline and community. You will gain a background in fundamental science content, the tools of science and the tools for learning science. This will be accomplished using issues of debate related to science and medicine. Embedded in the discussion will be the fundamental science concepts necessary for explaining the issues. Students will also spend a significant amount of time developing study skills and life skills that will help them to achieve their goals in college and beyond.

HMHV 2110.
LITERATURE, FINE ARTS, AND MEDICINE. (3)
Restriction: permission of instructor.
Seminar exploring links among health, illness, literature and the arts, encompassing a diverse range of forms and genres. Topics include representations of health, illness, and medicine; arts as therapy; medical history in literature and art.


HMSV - HUMAN SERVICES 

HMSV 1110.
GROUP DYNAMICS. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Prerequisite: HS 101 or HS Coordinator permission.
Drawing on both theoretical and observer- participation models, students will explore various relationships as they develop in dyads, small-group and large-group settings. Relates practical experience from field placement to group models of interaction.

HMSV 1120.
INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Provides basic knowledge of the interviewing process with emphasis on developing interviewing skills. Develops an awareness of ways in which the student’s background, attitude, and behavior influence the interview.

HMSV 2215.
ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE: PREVENTION AND TREATMENT. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Overview of the continuum of care including case management, co-occurring disorders, mandatory reporting issues, family substance abuse, domestic violence and juvenile justice issues. Includes cultural competency treatment implications with diverse populations.

HMSV 2230.
ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE COUNSELING IN SPECIAL POPULATIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides a broad overview of the field, including issues of alcohol and other drugs in history and society. Definitions and prevalence of alcohol and drugs use misuse and addiction; major theoretical perspectives on the causes and remedies of substance abuse; major landmarks in alcohol and drug social policy; and the development and evolution of the alcohol and drug abuse counseling field.

HMSV 2270.
SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN FAMILIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: 2230.
This course examines substance abuse within the context of a family system. It includes aspects such as developing a substance abuse family identity, typical problem-solving behaviors in substance-abuse families, daily routine regulators of home life, family ritual disruptions and intergenerational transmission of substance-abuse patterns. 

HMSV 2320.
PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Legal and ethical issues emanating from the professional helping relationship in human services, substance abuse treatment, and child welfare such as confidentiality, privileged communication, dual relationships, competency and reciprocal roles of both client and helper. Corequisite: 2998.

HMSV 2998.
INTERNSHIP IN HUMAN SERVICES. (3)
Corequisite: HMSV 2320.
Application of theories, experience and classroom instruction to an agency setting. Internship requires a total of 150 hours in an approved human services agency and attendance at bi-weekly integrative seminars. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.


HS - HUMAN SERVICES


HS 101.
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES. (3)
This course describes the range of services in the field of Human Services and the history of social welfare institutions.  Students will learn to understand the roles and responsibilities of human service professionals and how our societal and personal values influence approaches to social issues and professional practice. The student will successfully complete a report on a local human services agency, which requires the student to articulate professional roles and responsibilities. 

HS 102.
PRINCIPLES OF INTERVIEWING. (3)
The course focuses on the principles and identification of an interview, its design, and techniques that assist in conducting an effective interview. The course will develop interviewing skills with an extensive understanding of the components that comprise an effective interview. The interviewing tools and strategies used in this course are applicable to individuals, children, and families. This course will assist students in interviewing skills that are an important component for competent and ethical practice in the Human Service Profession.  

HS 105.
GROUP DYNAMICS. (3)
Group Dynamics introduces you to basic issues and stages of development in the group counseling process: overview of types of counseling groups, group theory, leadership, ethical guidelines, group formation and termination.   

HS 109.
TECHNIQUES OF ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION. (3)
Prerequisite: HS 101 and 102.
The course surveys means of obtaining and evaluating information about difficulties which bring people to mental health or social service settings and introduces students to various techniques and processes for assisting individuals, groups, and families.

HS 250.
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES. (4)
Prerequisite: HS 101, 102, 109 & Psych 105 or HS Coordinator permission.
Practical experience in a clinical setting involving service to clients and patients in various human service agencies; understanding the helping process.

HS 251.
ADVANCED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES. (4)
Prerequisite: HS 101, 102 ,109, 250 & Psych 105 or HS Coordinator permission.
Continuation of HS 250 with increased student responsibility for client/care service. Weekly seminar.

HS 252.
ADVANCED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES. (4)
Prerequisite: HS 101, 102, 109, 250, 251 & Psych 105 or HS Coordinator permission. Continuation of 251 with increased student responsibility for client/care service. Weekly seminar.

HS 293.
TOPICS. (3)


HSMT - HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 

HSMT 101.
INTRO HOSPITALITY TOURISM REC. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce students to the world’s largest industries, from destination planning, hotel and restaurant management to sports, entertainment and event management and provide an overview of the tourism and hospitality industry. We live in one of the most beautiful regions of the country and Tourism and Hospitality are thriving industries with a multitude of employment opportunities. Other topics include trends, planning, design, location, and procedures, materials, equipment and supplies. This is an ideal course for students interested in working in the industry regionally or planning to pursue a degree in this program of study.

HSMT 102.
CUSTOMER RELATIONS, SERVICE AND DIVERSITY. (3)
The purpose of this course is to ensure students understand the importance of customer relations and service in the Hospitality Industry.  This course will also assist students’ professional development through cultural sensitivity training and working with customers who may have physical disabilities.

HSMT 103.
MANAGEFIRST CONTROLLING FOODSERVICE COSTS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces students to the importance of cost control in the success of a foodservice operation. The students will learn about the different types of costs faced by managers in the food service industry, how to budget and forecast, how to calculate food cost, how to determine menu prices, how to control food costs throughout the operation, how to control labor costs, and how to protect revenue.

HSMT 104.
HOSPITALITY HR & SUPERVISION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course examines the evolving human resources function within today’s hospitality industry. Students will examine the changing roles and responsibilities of human resources managers, the acceptance and integration of the human resources function as a full business partner, and the higher expectations placed on human resources leadership to make a significant contribution to the successful management of the organization. Students will explore the role managers and supervisors play in the efficient management of the organization’s human resources. Topics to be examined include: the functions of Human Resource Management, relationships within the organization, policies and procedures, workplace diversity, and the role of human resources in a global economy.

HSMT 105.
HOSPITALITY AND RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course compares and contrasts the operational challenges facing managers in the Hospitality industry. Students will review the procedures for establishing strategies and plans for operation and for promoting the overall success of an organization. Supervision issues are introduced along with discussions and problems concerning costing and financial issues. The course also provides an overview of organizational behavior in the hospitality industry with an emphasis on management philosophy, policy formulation, communications, motivation, and organizational change.

HSMT 106.
DINING ROOM SERVICE AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT. (3)
This course covers all aspects of Front of the House /Dining Room service and Beverage Management in restaurants and other organizations within the hospitality industry. This includes food and cash controls, POS systems, dining room service styles and dining area merchandising. Receptions, banquets, buffets are covered from the bus person to Maître d' positions. Special event presentations and a variety of beverage management concepts and techniques will also be examined.  

HSMT 107.
HOSPITALITY AND RESTAURANT MARKETING. (3)
This course introduces the principles, concepts and systems utilized in the marketing and sales areas within the hospitality industry. An in depth analysis of marketing strategies and theories with a holistic appreciation of the scope and importance of the marketing and sales functions in the hospitality business.

HSMT 108.
HOSPITALITY INTERNSHIP. (3)
Internship in the field of hospitality.


IT - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

 

IT 101.
COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS. (3)
A suggested pre- or corequisite is OBT 105.

This course is designed for students with little or no computer experience. The course will prepare the student to utilize computer hardware and software effectively and efficiently. The student is given the opportunity to learn to use electronic mail, explore the web, perform basic file management procedures (copy, rename, create subdirectories, etc.), and edit, format, and print simple documents. The student will also have an opportunity to learn basic information of computer systems to include the functions of various hardware components, the importance of software programs, how information is processed, and the social and ethical implications of the computer generation.

IT 119.
NETWORKING CORE CONCEPTS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The course is designed to teach students networking and internetworking technology skills. It introduces networking standards, concepts, topology, media and terminology including LANs, WANs, the OSI model, cabling, IP addressing, subnetting, network hardware and various protocols. This course will prep students to take and complete the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.

IT 125.
MICROCOMPUTING OPERATING SYSTEMS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This class will focus on gaining an understanding of what an Operating System is and how they are constructed and used day to day. The class will be hands-on technical in nature and will require strong computer skills. Successful students will gain an understanding of Operating Systems and will be well versed in their basic functions. Linux Operating System will be introduced as the example OS for the class. Additionally, the class will discuss MAC OS, Windows OS, iOS, and how Operating Systems exist on Cloud environments. There is no prerequisite for this class - however - students should have a background or express an interest in learning about their own personal computer including at the command line.

IT 130. 
MICROCOMPUTING OPERATING SYSTEMS. (3)

Prerequisite: 119 and CS 101.
This class covers the skills necessary to select, install/deploy, integrate platforms or components to support an organization's IT infrastructure. 

IT 133
Computer and Security Fundamentals. (3)
The course will introduce the fundamental security and design principles for cyber space, cyber defense operations and the basic theory and practice of cryptographic techniques for computer and network security. It will cover topics such as: cloud, network, hardware, software, and data security. This course will also cover physical security; backup procedures; relevant tools; encryption; and protection from viruses. This course will prep students to sit for the CompTIA Security+ Exam.

IT 142.
INTRODUCTIONS TO BUSINESS SYSTEMS DATABASE
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of database systems including document, SQL and NOSQL databases and how they are used programmatically.

IT 193.
TOPICS. (1-3)

IT 230.
IT NETWORKING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
To allow the student to explore the core fundamental concepts of networking systemswith an emphasis on covering a lot of material at a high level. The primary objective of the class is for the student to build confidence with the most basic concepts of IP netvvorking. The class is intended for students with little or no experience with technology to build a foundation for upper level studies. In addition, the class covers the spectrum of IT careers (Software Development/ Hardware Design and implementation) and allows the student to learn where their passion lies.

IT 231.
SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides a general overview of computer technology and essential terminology, with emphasis on the connection between information systems and business needs. Students gain an introductory understanding of hardware, software, operating systems and Internet tools. In addition to learning about networking, word processing and software applications, students develop an understanding of integral business management concepts and practices.

IT 250.
WEB FUNDAMENTALS. (3)
This class is a hands-on introduction to designing, developing and maintaining web sites for business. Students will start by learning the basics of the internet and how web pages work. Students will then learn the HyperText Markup Language (HTML) by creating their own structured web pages, followed by Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for advanced styling of the pages. While students won't develop fully functional web applications, the successful student will be introduced to JavaScript for making web sites interactive and functional which lays the foundation for developing web applications. There are no pre-requisites for this course and no prior experience or knowledge is necessary. Only a desire to learn and discover and a willingness to try.

IT 260.
INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND SECURITY. (3)
Prerequisite: 119 and CS 101.
The primary goal of the course is a general introduction to defense-in-depth perimeter security on both Windows and LINUX/UNIS networks and an in-depth study of the step-by-step approach used in computer/network attacks. 

IT 262.
SCRIPTING FOR NETWORK DEFENSE. (3)
Prerequisite: 130 and 260 and CS 101 and CS 152L.
Scripting programming for security purposes. Students build on prior programming. operating system, and security knowledge to develop, code, use, and debug new and existing scripts. 

IT 270.
GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION. (3)
This course introduces the student to the concepts, tools, and techniques of microcomputer-based, two-dimensional graphics and animation. Students use microcomputer painting software to create visual effects and still images, and they use animation software to produce the illusion of movement. Students are taught design fundamentals, as well as the essentials of color theory, and they explore the differences between pigment color and light color. 

IT 271.
DATABASES AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT. (3) 
Pre- or corequisite: 250.
This course will cover development and administration issues of relational databases. Topics to span areas of efficient collection, organization, retrieval and management of data. 

IT 293.
TOPICS. (3)


LING - LINGUISTICS 

LING 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no
limit Δ)

LING 2110.
INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course presents an introduction to the study of language through the basic aspects of linguistic analysis: the sound system (phonetics and phonology), the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax), and the ways in which language is used to convey meaning (semantics and pragmatics). In addition, the course will investigate how language is acquired and stored in the brain, and how differences in speech styles and dialects reflect different social and cultural backgrounds of individual speakers. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

LING 2996.
TOPICS. (
1-6, no limit Δ)


LLSS - LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND SOCIOCULTURAL STUDIES

LLSS 1110.
FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN INDIAN EDUCATION. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is an exploration of American Indian education from the past to the present. Topics include: boarding schools, Indigenous language issues, policies, practices, experiences, educational models, language and cultural maintenance, urban/rural schools. In particular, this course will look at curriculum, pedagogy, and the processes of education that empower students to draw on their personal strengths and lived experiences and to develop their confidence in their abilities to learn. We will explore ways to understand and appreciate students’ background, and to foster learning that values the rich cultural and linguistic resources that children bring to the classroom, so that we can help learners successfully integrate the learning community of the school with their broader communities.

LLSS 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

LLSS 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


MAS - MASSAGE THERAPY

Most MAS courses require enrollment in the massage therapy program. One credit courses may be taken for continuing education by massage therapist or equivalent skill set.

MAS 250.
MASSAGE THERAPY I. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
For students enrolled in massage program. This course focuses on expanding the palpation skills of massage student therapists focusing on deep tissue techniques, kinesiology, muscle anatomy and physiology.

MAS 251.
MASSAGE THERAPY II. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course will build on medical massage fundamentals learned in MAS250. Students will learn and apply hydrotherapy, energy, oriental medicine, sports massage, contraindications and disease education. Other massage modalities may be explored at the discretion of the instructor. Students will work on each other in a safe, supportive, and professional environment.

MAS 252.
MASSAGE THERAPHY III. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course is for students enrolled in the UNM Integrative Massage Therapy Program who have successfully completed Massage Therapy II. This course will provide the opportunity for students to refine their understanding of Medical Massage fundamentals as well as an opportunity to practice. Students will continue learning application of hydrotherapy, sports massage, contraindications and disease education. This course is meant to be taken in conjunction with the clinical practicum. Other massage modalities may be explored at the discretion of the instructor. Students will work on each other in a safe, supportive, and professional environment.  

MAS 253.
DEEP TISSUE TECHNIQUES I. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
For students enrolled in the massage program. This course builds on previous courses and deepens the palpatory skills as well as the understanding of pathology, muscle anatomy and physiology. This course offers an introduction to myofascial release and is open to professionals seeking continuing education.

MAS 254.
MYOFASCIAL AND MYOSKELETAL TECHNIQUES IN MASSAGE THERAPY. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
For students in the massage program or professionals seeking continuing education. The focus of this course is myofascial and myoskeletal techniques. Students will further their understanding of myofascial anatomy and learn how to incorporate the techniques.

MAS 255.
CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MASSAGE THERAPY. (6)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
For students enrolled in the Massage Therapy Program. This course will provide the opportunity for students to practice their basic medical massage fundamentals in a professional massage setting with the public and is required course.

MAS 255L.
CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MASSAGE THERAPY LABORATORY. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
Full online course. Computer and internet connection required. Students will learn advanced massage techniques, refine their skills and prepare for the MBLEx exam.

MAS 257.
INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL BALINESE MASSAGE. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Students learn the healing art of traditional Balinese massage, anthropological studies, religious influences, cultural diversity and hands-on techniques used in Bali. This course is open to all students and professional massage therapists for continuing education. Emphasis on visceral application and channel theory.

MAS 258.
INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL THAI MASSAGE. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Traditional Thai massage is an experience of rhythmical movement where the practitioner leads the receiver through a flow of passive yoga stretches, deep muscle pressure and joint mobilization. An introductory, full-body sequence of Thai massage will be taught. Class will emphasize meditative awareness, breathing, use of body weight and posture. This course is open to all students and professional massage therapists for continuing education.

MAS 259.
EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program or massage training.
This class focuses on the various exercise testing evaluations, dietary approach for peak performance, the physiology of exercise, and exercise for special populations i.e. diabetes. This course is required for the massage therapy program and continuing education for professionals.

MAS 260.
CULTURAL DIVERSITY COMPETENCY AND CROSS-CULTURAL ETHICAL ISSUES. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course addresses the ethical and cultural component of massage therapy as it relates to allopathic and complementary alternative medicine settings and is a required course in the massage therapy program.

MAS 261.
CRANIAL SACRAL II. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: MAS 265.
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course will continue in the education of Cranial I (MAS 265) and offer a more in-depth experience of bio-mechanical, somatio-emotional, an energetic aspects of Craniosacral therapy. Students will have an opportunity to acquire and practice specific, safe, and effective cranial techniques that are enhancement to a new or existing massage practice. This course is open to all students and professional massage therapists for continuing education.

MAS 265.
CRANIAL SACRAL I. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
In introduction to concepts in craniosacral therapy, which will introduce students to the bio-mechanical, somatio-emotional, an energetic aspects of the field. This course is open to all students and professional continuing education.

MAS 270.
ORIENTAL MEDICINE HANDS-ON. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course is one of the require oriental medicine courses required for students enrolled in the massage program. It will introduce and advance the understanding of yin/yang theory, five element theory and how it is directly applicable to massage sequencing.

MAS 280.
MASSAGE ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY. (3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course is for students enrolled in the massage. This course will provide the opportunity for students to learn how body systems affect the ability to move and how movement in turn influences the body systems, deepening an understanding of the concept ‘movement as medicine’. Also examining how correct nutrition, diet and supplementation can enhance overall health. We will promote a deeper understanding of human anatomy at a conceptual and tactile level, a portion of the class will involve hands on exploration of concepts with related massage techniques.

MAS 293.
TOPICS IN MASSAGE THERAPY. (1-3)
Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course is for various topics in massage therapy. It offers a wide variety of continuing education and topics in massage therapy from 1- 3 credit hours. Courses will vary depending on the need of the student body and developments in massage therapy.


MATHEMATICS (MATH)

MATH 099.
PRE-ALGEBRA. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This is an introductory mixed course designed to prepare students for math success in the area of Pre-Algebra. Emphasis is placed on familiarizing students with basic areas involving operations on fractions and decimals, ratios, proportions and percents; sign number operations, measurement, elements of Geometry, elements of Algebra and word problems.  

MATH 100.
INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA. (4)
Satisfactory completion of MATH 100 meets prerequisite for MATH 120.
Includes signed numbers, solving linear equations, formulas, graphing, solving systems of equations and applications. Also covers exponents and polynomials, factoring, roots and radicals and quadratics. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. 

MATH 106.
PROBLEMS IN INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA. (1)
Study session for 1215 with an emphasis on problem solving. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

MATH 107.
PROBLEMS IN COLLEGE ALGEBRA. (1)
Study session for 1220 with an emphasis on problem solving. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

MATH 108.
PROBLEMS IN PRE-CALCULUS. (1)
Study session for 1240 with an emphasis on problem solving. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

MATH 110.
PROBLEMS IN ELEMENTS OF CALCULUS. (1)
Study session for 1430 with an emphasis on problem-solving. (I) Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

MATH 1118.
MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS I. (3)
Prerequisite: 1130 or 1215 or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or FYEX 1010 or ACT Math =>19 or SAT Math Section =>480 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Arithmetic =>276.
Course offers an in-depth look at rational numbers, arithmetic operations, and basic geometric concepts. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. 

MATH 1130
SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS. (3)
Prerequisite: (118 and 119) or 1215 or (1215X and 1215Y) or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1350 or 1430 or 1440 or 1512 or 1522 or 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =>218 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics =>253.
This course will develop students’ ability to work with and interpret numerical data, to apply logical and symbolic analysis to a variety of problems, and/or to model phenomena with mathematical or logical reasoning. Topics include financial mathematics used in everyday life situations, statistics, and optional topics from a wide array of authentic contexts. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 116.
TOPICS IN PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS
. (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)
Restriction: permission of department.
Selected topics from algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

MATH 1215
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA. (3)
Prerequisite: (MATH 021 and MATH 022) or MATH 100 or FYEX 1010 or ISM 100 or ACT Math =>17 or SAT Math Section =>460 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =218-238.
This course includes equations and inequalities, applications and problem solving with linear equations, linear functions and the graph of a line, percent, perimeters, areas of simple geometric shapes.

MATH 1215X.
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA PART IA. (1)
Prerequisite: (MATH 021 and MATH 022) or MATH 100 or FYEX 1010 or ISM 100 or ACT Math =>17 or SAT Math Section =>460 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =218-238.
Corequisite: MATH 1215Y.
A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems.  This is the first course in a three-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for MATH 1215, all courses in this sequence (MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, MATH 1215Z) must be taken and passed.

MATH 1215Y.
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA PART IB. (1)
Prerequisite: MATH 1215X.
A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. This is the second course in a three-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for MATH 1215, all courses in this sequence (MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, MATH 1215Z) must be taken and passed.

MATH 1215Z.
INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA PART IC. (1)
Prerequisite: MATH 1215Y.
A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. This is the third course in a three-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for MATH 1215, all courses in this sequence (MATH 1215X, MATH 1215Y, MATH 1215Z) must be taken and passed.

MATH 1220.
COLLEGE ALGEBRA. (3)
Prerequisite: (MATH 118 and 119) or 1215 or (1215X and 1215Y and 1215Z) or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =239-248. Preparation for 1240 and 1430. The study of equations, functions and graphs, reviewing linear and quadratic functions, and concentrating on polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Emphasizes algebraic problem solving skills and graphical representation of functions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 1230.
TRIGONOMETRY. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.
A study of plane trigonometry including the definitions of the fundamental trig functions using right angle triangle and unit circle approaches. Trig functions of any real number will be evaluated and the functions graphed along with their transformations. Trigonometric identities will be developed and demonstrated including multiple angle identities and identities developed from them. Inverse trigonometric functions will be developed and used to solve trigonometric equations. Trigonometric applications will be solved using right angle trigonometry and the laws of sines and cosines. Trigonometric methods will be applied to complex numbers and the use of 2D vectors and vector dot products. May be taken concurrently with 1240.

MATH 1240.
PRE-CALCULUS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.
This course extends students’ knowledge of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions to new contexts, including rates of change, limits, systems of equations, conic sections, and sequences and series. May be taken concurrently with 1230. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 1250.
TRIGONOMETRY AND PRE-CALCULUS. (5)
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.
Includes the study of functions in general with emphasis on the elementary functions: algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Topics include rates of change, limits, systems of equations, conic sections, sequences and series, trigonometric equations and identities, complex number, vectors, and applications. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 1350.
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS. (3)
Prerequisite: (MATH 118 and 119) or 1215 or (1215X and 1215Y) or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1430 or 1440 or 1512 or 1522 or 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics =>253.
This course discusses the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students will gain introductions to topics such as descriptive statistics, probability and basic probability models used in statistics, sampling and statistical inference, and techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data. These concepts will be illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 1430.
APPLICATIONS OF CALCULUS I. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or 1240 or 1250 or ACT Math =>26 or SAT Math Section =>620 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =249-283.
An algebraic and graphical study of derivatives and integrals, with an emphasis on applications to business, social science, economics and the sciences. Credit for both this course and MATH 1512 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 1440.
APPLICATIONS OF CALCULUS II. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1430
Topics in this course include functions of several variables, techniques of integration, an introduction to basic differential equations, and other applications. Credit for both this course and MATH 1522 may not be applied toward a degree program.

MATH 1512.
CALCULUS I. (4)
Prerequisite: (MATH 1230 and 1240) or 1250 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>640 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =>284.
Limits. Continuity. Derivative: definition, rules, geometric interpretation and as rate-of-change, applications to graphing, linearization and optimization. Integral: definition, fundamental theorem of calculus, substitution, applications such as areas, volumes, work, averages. Credit for both this course and MATH 1430 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 1522.
CALCULUS II. (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1512
Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, numerical integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor series with applications, complex variables, differential equations. Credit for both this course and MATH 1440 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 192.
TOPICS.  (1-3)

MATH 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ) 

MATH 2115.
MATH FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 2118.
Development of mathematical concepts from the viewpoint of the middle school curriculum. Topics include: in-depth development of algebraic thinking, connections between algebra and geometry, and applications. Problem solving is emphasized throughout.

MATH 2118.
MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS III. (3)
Prerequisite: 1118 and (1215X or 1220 or 1230 or 1240 or 1350 or 1430 or 1512 or ACT Math =>19 or SAT Math Section =>480 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics =>262).
Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Also included: topics from probability and statistics with connections to other topics in the elementary curriculum. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 2: Mathematics and Statistics.

MATH 2530.
CALCULUS III. (4)
Prerequisite: MATH 1522
Vector operations, vector representation of planes and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, tangent planes, optimization, multiple integrals in Cartesian cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals and Green’s theorem.

MATH 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)


MGMT -MANAGEMENT

MGMT 105.
BUSINESS CO-OP WORK PHASE. (0)
Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

MGMT 116
HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS. (3)
Designed to acquaint the student with human relations in business and the psychological application of modern business practices as they apply to individual employees and supervisors.

MGMT 158.
ETHICS IN ORGANIZATIONS
. (3)
Introduction to ethical issues in business, government, and nonprofit organizations and how to deal with those issues. Emphasis on ethical reasoning and cases of ethical and unethical behavior in management and the professions.


MKTG - MARKETING

MKTG 2110
PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Survey of modern marketing concepts and practices focusing on the marketing mix: product, pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies. Topics include the marketing environment, consumer behavior, marketing research, target marketing, and the ethical and social responsibilities of marketers. Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. Business Administration.


MUSC - MUSIC 

MUSC 1120.
MUSIC APPRECIATION: ROCK AND ROLL. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course fee.
An introduction to the fundamentals of music and the development of listening skills through the examination of rock music, including its history, styles and significance in the realm of popular music. No musical background necessary. (NM).  Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

MUSC 1130.
MUSIC APPRECIATION: WESTERN MUSIC. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Course fee.
Designed to expand the student’s ability to listen actively to Western classical art music; a survey of the various genres, including chamber music, symphonic and vocal repertoire. Includes live guest performances. Attendance at several on-campus concerts required. No musical background necessary. (NM) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.


NATV - NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES 

NATV 1150.
INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course surveys the significance of Native American Studies through an inter-disciplinary approach to two areas of academic concentration: Indigenous Learning Communities, and Leadership and Building Native Nations. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

NATV 2110.
SOCIOPOLITICAL CONCEPTS IN NATIVE AMERICA. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: 150.
This course examines a body of politics identified with Native America specific to historical and contemporary relevance for understanding Native American/Indigenous/American Indian nations and communities. Students are challenged to identify issues and debates based on selected readings, films; case examples; and guest presentations to engage in informed discussions about the socio-political experience of Native Americans within the U.S. and indigenous peoples internationally, including ‘global’ activist movements. The course will use a seminar discussion format to present key (theoretical-methodological) approaches to developing a critical understanding of social and political issues impacting Native Americans today. To make the ‘intangible’ i.e., thinking, values, and belief systems but not limited to policies and political behavior, cultural expression that result in tangible actions affecting Native American peoples. Students are expected to develop and refine their skills in articulating verbal and written critiques of sociopolitical concepts identified.

NATV 255.
TOPICS IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES
. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Topics courses taught by Native and non-Native faculty from the University of New Mexico and community, varying according to instructor’s expertise. May be repeated as topic varies.


NMNC - NMNEC NURSING 

NMNC 1110
INTRODUCTION TO NURSING CONCEPTS. (3)
Prerequisite: BIOL 1140 and BIOL 1140L and BIOL 2210 and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215) and (ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1110Y or ENGL 1110Z) and NURS 239 and PSYC1110 and PSYC 2120.
Corequisite: NMNC 1135 and BIOL 2225 and NURS 240.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.
This course introduces the ADN nursing student to the concepts of nursing practice and conceptual learning.

NMNC 1135.
PRINCIPLES OF NURSING PRACTICE. (3)
Prerequisite: BIOL 1140 and BIOL 1140L and BIOL 2210 and BIOL 2210L and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215) and (ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1110Y or ENGL.
1110Z).
Corequisite: NMNC 1110 and BIOL 2225 and BIOL 2225L and NURS 239.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
This course introduces the ADN nursing student to the application of concepts through clinical skills in seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings. Principles of communication, assessments, safety, and interventions including calculation, measurement, and administration of medications.

NMNC 1210.
HEALTH AND ILLNESS CONCEPTS I. (3)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 1220 and 1235 and NURS 240 and HCHS 125.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing
This course will focus on health and illness concepts across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, sexuality/reproduction, protection/movement, and emotional processes.

NMNC 1220.
HEALTH CARE PARTICIPANT. (3)
Prerequisite: 1110 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 1210 and 1235 and HCHS 125 and NURS 240.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing
This course introduces the nursing student to the attributes of the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community. 

NMNC 1230.
NURSING PHARMACOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and 1135 and NURS 240
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing.
This course introduces the nursing student to pharmacologic nursing practice from a conceptual approach. 

NMNC 1235.
ASSESSMENT AND HEALTH PROMOTION. (3)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 1210 and 1220 and HCHS 125 and NURS 240.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
This course introduces the nursing student to the assessment of and the health promotion for the health care participant as an individual, family, or community. This course uses seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings.

NMNC 2310.
HEALTH AND ILLNESS CONCEPTS II. (3)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and NURS 239 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 2320 and 2335.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
This course will cover health and illness concepts across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to oxygenation and hemostasis, homeostasis and regulation, protection and movement, and cognitive and behavioral processes.

NMNC 2320.
PROFESSIONAL NURSING CONCEPTS I. (3)
Prerequisite: NMNC1210 and 1220 and 1235.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
This course covers foundational concepts for professional development, including selected professional attributes and care competencies.

NMNC 2335.
CARE OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS. (4)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and NURS 239 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 2310 and NURS 290.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
The focus of this course is to provide safe, evidence-based nursing care for patients with chronic conditions, across the lifespan in a variety of settings. This course is a combination of lab and clinical.

NMNC 2410.
HEALTH & ILLNESS CONCEPTS III. (4)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and 2310 and 2320 and 2335 and NURS 239 and NURS 240 and NURS 240L.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
This course will cover health and illness concepts, with the focus on acute conditions across the lifespan. Concepts covered are related to homeostasis/regulation, oxygenation/hemostasis, protection/movement, and emotional processes

NMNC 2435.
CLINICAL INTENSIVE I. (4)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and 2310 and 2320 and 2335 and NURS 239 and NURS 240 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 2410.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
In this course students will apply the curricular concepts in the management of care to health care participants with acute conditions across the lifespan. This course is a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical.

NMNC 2445.
ADN CAPSTONE. (2)
Prerequisite: NMNC 1110 and 1210 and 1220 and 1235 and 2310 and 2320 and 2335 and NURS 239 and NURS 240 and NURS 240L.
Corequisite: NMNC 2410.
Restriction: admitted to A.S. Nursing. 
In this course students will apply the curricular concepts in the management of care to health care participants with acute conditions across the lifespan. This course is a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical.


NTSC - NATURAL SCIENCE

NTSC 1110.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduces the science of geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy, with emphasis on the sciences processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. This course is activity based utilizing problems and issues based approach. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

NTSC 1120.
LIFE SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Uses activities for the study of science topics including botany, cell biology, genetics, microbiology and zoology with emphasis on science processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

NTSC 2110.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS. (4)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduces major issues in environmental science with emphasis on science processes, scientific investigations and field-based activities, and the integration of technology. Course topics include current issues on population, healthy ecosystems, and natural resources. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.


NUTRITION (NUTR)

NUTR 1110.
NUTRITION FOR HEALTH. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides an overview of general concepts of nutrition, which can be applied to food choices that support a healthy lifestyle. The cultural, psychological, physiological and economic implications of food choices are explored.

NUTR 2110. 
HUMAN NUTRITION
. (3)
This course provides an overview of nutrients, including requirements, digestion, absorption, transport, function in the body and food sources. Dietary guidelines intended to promote long-term health are stressed.

 

OBT - OFFICE AND BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

OBT 293.
TOPICS. (3)

PCST - PEACE STUDIES

PCST 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO PEACE STUDIES. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to peace research. Primary content of Peace Studies Program; focuses on the concepts of peace/war, security/conflict, and violence/non-violence. Special emphasis on non- violent conflict resolution, human rights, and social/environmental justice issues.


PENP – PHYSICAL EDUCATION NON-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

PENP 167.
YOGALATES
. (1-2, no limit Δ)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Instruction and practice in movements that combine
elements of Yoga and Pilates.


PH – PUBLIC HEALTH 

PH 101.
INTRODUCTION TO POPULATION HEALTH. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to Population Health provides a population perspective on the multi-level (ecologic) determinants of health, disease and injury; the programs, policies and services that protect and promote health and prevent disease; and the analytic tools used by population health professionals.

PH 102.
GLOBAL HEALTH CHALLENGES AND RESPONSES. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Global health is concerned with developing theories and methods to understand the roots of social, economic, political and environmental determinants of health, with a focus on the nature of health inequalities across the world.

PH 103.
INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY HEALTH WORK. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides an overview of the history and introduction to the Community Health Worker (CHW) profession, including scope of practice, roles, competencies, attributes and qualities. It provides practice-based guidelines for professional conduct, ethics and boundaries, confidentiality and informed consent. It exposes students to professional organizations, encourages professional identify and development; and reviews the processes for CHW certification in New Mexico.

PH 104.
CLINICAL BASICS FOR FRONTLINE HEALTH WORKERS. (1)
This course prepares student with basic skills for working in clinical and home health settings; vital signs, blood glucose monitoring, foot exams, calculating BMI, OSHA standards, medical terminology, documentation, standing orders, opioid overdose reversal, and Basic Life Support (BLS).

PH 105.
MENTAL HEALTH FIRST RESPONDER. (1)
Mental Health First Aid introduces participants to the risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems, builds an understanding of the importance of early intervention, and reviews common supports. Includes evidence-based strategies for responding to suicide risk and thoughts of self-harm. Students will learn to offer initial help to someone in a mental health or substance use crisis through a 5-step action plan, with the ultimate goal to connect persons to appropriate professional, peer, social, and self-help care. The program also teaches the common risk factors and warning signs of specific types of illnesses like anxiety, depression, substance use, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Participants are introduced to local mental health resources, national organizations, support groups, and online tools for mental health and addictions treatment and support.  Participants will also be trained in identifying, responding to, and administering medication (NARCAN) to reverse opioid overdoses.

PH 201.
POPULATION HEALTH BIOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C or BIOL 2210 or BIOL 2305.
Introduction to biological disease basis, including cellular, physiological, genetic, immunologic, and environmental determinants. Pathologic mechanisms and host susceptibility for infectious and non-infectious diseases of population health importance including disease prevention/control delivered in a team-based format.

PH 202.
COMMUNITY HEALTH WORK; FRAMEWORKS, PRINCIPLES, AN PRACTICES FOR DIRECT SERVICE. (1)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides a broad introduction to public health as the framework for providing direct services to individuals, with focus on the ecological model, health equity, and healthcare systems. It provides in-depth skills practice for providing effective service within that framework, including interpersonal and communication skills, cultural humility, and client-centered, strengths-based approaches. It applies those core skills to an array of scenarios including conducting client interviews, managing and resolving conflict, working on a care team, and delivering health literate, trauma-informed care.

PH 203.
HEALTH COACHING AND HEALTH PROMOTION. (1)
This course provides a strong foundation in health coaching and health promotion, with a focus on working with individuals from a broader public health lens. It offers strategies and skills for supporting client-centered behavior change including action planning, motivational interviewing, and communication skills. It identifies barriers to change such as stigma and bias, gaps in health literacy, and offers strategies for addressing those barriers. Lessons learned will be applied to scenarios involving harm reduction, and the self-management of chronic conditions. Using the HEAL model, students will explore practical frameworks and guidelines for promoting health, delivering health education, and accessing and communicating reliable health information.

PH 204.
HEALTH NAVIGATION SERVICE COORDINATION. (1)
This course provides an overview of models, skills, tools, resources, and considerations for providing strengths-based health navigation and service coordination with clients. Rooted in principles of client-centered practice, this course will explore best practices for planning, conducting and documenting case-finding and recruitment, establishing and maintain relationship via client interviewing, developing service plans, making and tracking meaningful referrals, and building client self-efficacy and self-reliance. Reviews major health and social service programs, services, eligibility, enrollment. Addresses the importance of building relationships with referral sources and agencies.

PH 205.
HEALTH EDUCATION AND FACILITATION. (2)
This course provides an overview of the major approaches, models, skills, and knowledge needed to plan, facilitate, and evaluate basic health education presentations for groups in clinical and community settings. It provides a similar overview to planning and facilitating groups and group processes for a variety of health-related purposes. The course offers an experiential immersion into principles of adult learning, and explores related media and instructional strategies. It address common challenges in group education and facilitation, and promotes best practices for the professional development and self-care of educators and facilitators including cultural humility, boundaries, confidentiality, supervision, and managing power dynamics.

PH 206.
COMMUNITY HEALTH OUTREACH, ASSESSMENT AND ADVOCACY. (2)
This course provides an overview of various approaches, models, methods, and considerations for conducting home visiting, health outreach, community organizing, and advocacy for improving community health. Students will learn to utilize a wide range of tools central to this work including environmental scans, community health assessments, surveys, focus groups, canvassing, and PhotoVoice. We will explore the unique the role of the health worker in advocating for communities, surfacing community-identified priorities, and activating and building community-based leadership. Addresses a wide range of considerations related to this aspect of community health work including building relationships and trust, ethics, confidentiality, and safety.  

PH 230.
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH. (3)
Prerequisite: 101 and 102.
Environmental and occupational health and safety; including regulatory processes, compliance, pollution prevention, drinking water, wastewater management, solid/hazardous waste, air quality, food protection, zoonotic and vector-borne disease control, radiation, injury prevention.

PH 240.
HEALTH SYSTEMS, SERVICES AND POLICIES. (3)
Prerequisite: 101 and 102.
Increase the analytical capacity and critical thinking in regards to the US health system, services and related policies. Reinforce the students¿ sense of social responsibility and further their understanding of population health approaches. 

PH 241.
FUNDAMENTALS OF HEALTH CARE FINANCE. (3)
Prerequisite: 101 and 102.
Introduction to health care finance for Population Health students.  The course will introduce basic concepts of health care finance: access, affordability, quality, and portability.

PH 260.
SPECIAL TOPICS
. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)
Topics in population health that are not covered in the existing curriculum that are mutually agreed upon by students and faculty. May be repeated for credit provided the subject matter varies.


PHED - PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHED 1110.
TOPICS IN DANCE
. (1-2, no limit Δ)

PHED 1410.
YOGA: BEGINNING YOGA
. (1-2, no limit Δ)
Introduction to five areas of yoga which are particularly significant to the Western World.

PHED 1420.
TOPICS IN STRETCHNG AND RELAXATION
. (1, no limit Δ)
Instruction and practice of various techniques to enhance flexibility and reduce stress.

PHED 1430.
PILATES
. (1, no limit Δ)
Instruction in movements that increase balance, core fitness and cardiorespiratory endurance.

PHED 1440.
TAI CHI
. (1, no limit Δ)
Instruction and practice in techniques to enhance body awareness, reduces stress, improve balance and increase strength.

PHED 1510.
TRAINING: RESISTANCE TRAINING
. (1, no limit Δ)
Individual training programs for development of general strength, tone, endurance and weight control. Fitness Test fee.

PHED 1620.
TOPICS IN FITNESS
. (1-2, no limit Δ)

PHED 1710.
TOPICS IN MARTIAL ARTS. (1-2, no li
mit Δ)

PHED 2410.
YOGA II: INTERMEDIATE YOGA
. (1-2, no limit Δ)
Instruction in more advanced techniques of Yoga emphasizing the physical aspects of Hatha Yoga.

PHED 2710.
TOPICS IN MARTIAL ARTS II
. (1-2, no limit Δ)

PHED 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


PHIL - PHILOSOPHY 

PHIL 1115.
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

PHIL 1120.
LOGIC, REASONING AND CRITICAL THINKING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments. The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

PHIL 1996.
TOPICS. (1-6, no limit
Δ)

PHIL 2140.
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course focuses on some of the ethical issues that arise in the context of professional life. Beginning with an overview of several major ethical theories, the course will consider how these theories, which traditionally concern personal morality, apply to life in a professional setting. The course will focus on issues that might include lying and truth-telling, whistleblowing, confidentiality, the obligations of businesses toward the public, and the ethical concerns of privacy in journalism. Using a combination of readings, case studies, and discussion, students will explore these issues by critically evaluating ethical principles and also applying them to real-world settings. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

PHIL 2210.
EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is an introductory survey of early modern Western philosophy. Through an in-depth reading of primary source material, this course will examine the traditions of Rationalism and Empiricism that emerged during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Concepts to be discussed might include theories of knowledge and metaphysics, early modern scientific thought, and theories of the self. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

PHIL 2220.
GREEK PHILOSPHY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is an introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy. The course will include discussion of such philosophers as the Pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Topics to be discussed may include the beginnings of scientific thought, theories of the self, the concept of being, virtue ethics, happiness, and theories of justice.

PHIL 2225.
GREEK THOUGHT. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy, literature, and history. Figures: the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle; Homer and Sophocles; Herodotus and Thucydides. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

PHIL 2240.
INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the tradition of existential philosophy through a careful reading of philosophical texts by authors, such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Heidegger.

PHIL 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ).



PHYS - PHYSICS

PHYS 1110.
PHYSICS AND SOCIETY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
If you are curious about how common things work, about physics that is relevant to social and political issues, or just about the natural world in general, this is just the course for you! No previous background in physics or mathematics (beyond high school algebra) is required or expected. Just bring a lively curiosity and a dedication to learning new things.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1115.
INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Overview of the concepts and basic phenomena of physics. This course provides a largely descriptive and qualitative treatment with a minimum use of elementary mathematics to solve problems. No previous knowledge of physics is assumed. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1115L.
SURVEY OF PHYSICS LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or co requisite: PHYS 1115
A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1115. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1120.
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED PHYSICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course is designed for students who need more experience with force and motion before tackling 1230 or 1310. It also serves as a good refresher for students who let some time lapse between taking Physics I and II.

PHYS 1125.
PHYSICS OF MUSIC. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction for non-science majors to basic concepts, laws, and skills in physics, in the context of a study of sound, acoustics, and music..

PHYS 1125L.
PHYSICS OF MUSIC LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: None. Pre- or corequisite: PSYC 1125
Experiments to accompany 1125. Two hours lab.

PHYS 1230.
ALGEBRA-BASED PHYSICS I. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>660 or ACCUPLACER Next-Generation Advanced Algebra and Functions =>284.
An algebra-based treatment of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion, equilibrium, and fluids.  The sequence (PHYS 1230, 1230L, 1240, 1240L) is required of pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-optometry students. Only 1230 and 1240 are required of pharmacy students. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1310 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1230L.
ALGEBRA BASED PHYSICS LABORATORY I. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: PSYC 1230.
A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1230. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1231.
PROBLEMS IN ALGEBRA-BASED PHYSICS I. (1)
Corequisite: PSYC 1230. 
This is a supplemental course for 1230. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

PHYS 1240.
ALGEBRA BASED PHYSICS II. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1230
The second half of a two semester algebra-based introduction to physics. This course covers electricity, magnetism and optics. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1320 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1240L.
ALGEBRA BASED PHYSICS II LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: PSYC 1240
A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1240. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1241.
PROBLEMS IN ALGEBRA-BASED PHYSICS II. (1)
Corequisite: PSYC 1240. 
This is a supplemental course for 1240. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

PHYS 1310.
CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS I. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1512.
A calculus-level treatment of classical mechanics and waves, which is concerned with the physical motion concepts, forces, energy concepts, momentum, rotational motion, angular momentum, gravity, and static equilibrium. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1230 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1310L.
CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS I LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: PSYC 1310.
A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1310. Students will apply the principles and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in coursework for 1310. Three hours lab. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1311.
PROBLEMS IN CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS I. (1)
Corequisite: PSYC 1310.
This is a supplemental course for 1310.  Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

PHYS 1320.
CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS II. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1310.
Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1522.
A calculus-level treatment of classical electricity and magnetism. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken at the same time as 1320L. Credit for both this course and PHYS 1240 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1320L.
CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS II LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: PSYC 1320.
A series of laboratory experiments associated with the material presented in 1320. Students will apply the principles and concepts highlighting the main objectives covered in coursework for 1320. Three hours lab.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 3: Physical and Natural Sciences.

PHYS 1321.
PROBLEMS IN CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS II. (1)
Corequisite: PSYC 1320.
This is a supplemental course for 1320. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

PSYC 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

PHYS 2310.
CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS III. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1320.
Pre- or corequisite: MATH 2530.
This course, the third in the calculus based sequence for science and engineering students, is a study of optics and topics in modern physics.

PHYS 2310L.
CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS III LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: PSYC 2310.
Covers topics in geometrical optics, wave optics and modern physics at the calculus level. Lab activities mirror and enhance lecture topics. Hands-on experiments involving data collection and analysis give students a better conceptual framework for understanding physics. Geometrical and wave optical phenomena are deeply probed. Three hours lab.

PHYS 2311.
PROBLEMS IN CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS III. (1)
Corequisite: PSYC 2310.
Problem solving and demonstrations related to 2310. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

PSYC 2415.
COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS
. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 2310.
Pre- or corequisite: MATH **316.
This class is designed as an introduction to programming for the undergraduate physics major. The class begins with no assumption of prior programming experience. An emphasis will be on building strong programming skills using the MATLAB programming environment. Applications and examples will include data analysis (curve fitting and optimization), simulating physical systems, solving systems of linear equations and Monte Carlo techniques.

PHYS 2996.
TOPICS. (1-6, no limit)

POLS - POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 1120.
AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course explains the role of American national government, its formation and principles of the Constitution; relation of state to the national government; political parties and their relationship to interest groups. This course also explains the structure of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 1140.
THE POLITICAL WORLD. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces politics with emphasis on the ways people can understand their own political systems and those of others in a greater depth. This course will help in becoming more responsible and effective in the political world. Students who have already had courses in political science may not count this course toward a major. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

POLS 2110.
COMPARATIVE POLITICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces comparative politics by examining the political history, social and economic structures, and contemporary political institutions and behavior, with focus on occurrences in countries representing diverse cultures, geographies, and levels of development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 2120.
INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course covers the analysis of significant factors in world politics, including nationalism, national interest, political economy, ideology, international conflict and collaboration, balance of power, deterrence, international law, and international organization. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 2130.
POLITICAL IDEAS: INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course offers an introductory survey of political theory. Emphasis is placed on (1) textual analysis of primary sources and on (2) scholarly analysis of the foundational questions and methods central to the academic study of political ideas. Studying political ideas involves thinking about a) the very definition of political theory itself, b) what one would need to know in order to make evidence- based claims about political theory texts and c) why and how the study of political theory leads political scientists into the exploration of “essentially contested concepts.” More specifically, throughout the semester, we will explore questions relating to 1) what is the definition of political theory; 2) why/how are interpretative disputes at the core of political theory and 3) how have major political theories/ideas—democracy, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, liberation theory, and fascism—changed and developed over time? In sum, this is a survey course on the history of political ideas. 

PPOLS 254.
INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN SOCIETY I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Introduction to Latin American Studies through the social sciences examines major themes including colonialism, agrarian transformation, urbanization, demographics, family, human rights, inequalities, violence, and social movements. Emphasis given to insights gained from making interdisciplinary connections.

POLS 2996.
TOPICS
. (3, no limit Δ)


PRPE - PROFESSIONAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PRPE 1996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)

PRPE 2110.
INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
The subject matter of this course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of athletic training and the basis for prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. In order to maintain accreditation requirements, this course is unique to UNM and may be not be replaced with a transferred course from another institution.

PRPE 2996.
TOPICS.
(1-6, no limit Δ)

PSYC - PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYC 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce students to the concepts, theories, significant findings, methodologies, and terminology that apply to the field of psychology.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSYC 2110.
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110
This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human social influence and interaction, and explores how an individual’s actions, emotions, attitudes and thought processes are influenced by society and other individuals.

PSYC 2120.
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110
Study of human physical and psychological change and stability from a lifespan development perspective.

PSYC 2220.
COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110
The course provides an overview of human cognitive processes such as attention, perception, memory, language, categorization, decision-making, reasoning, and problem solving. Includes methods, theories, and applications.

PSYC 2250.
BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110 or BIOL 1110 or 1140.
A general survey of the biological foundations of behavior. Emphasis is on the central nervous system.

PSYC 2270.
PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING AND MEMORY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110.
This course provides an overview of how information is acquired, stored, retrieved, and manifested in the behavior of human and non-human animals.

PSYC 2320.
HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110.
This course examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact with and affect different areas within health. Course will cover the role of stress in illness, coping with illness, pain management, and the role of health behavior in health and disease.

PSYC 2330.
PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110.
Exploration of the physiological, cultural, social and individual factors that influence sexual behavior, sex roles and sex identity.

PSYC 2510.
STATISTICAL PRINCIPLES FOR PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1110.
This course covers introductory-level topics in statistics that are applicable to psychological research. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered. Topics include applying statistical formulas to psychological data and interpreting the results of statistical analyses.

PSYC 2996.
TOPICS. (1-6, no limit
Δ)


RELG - RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

RELG 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course introduces major world religions and the scholarly methods of the academic study of religion. Religions covered may include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and/or New Religious Movements.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

RELG 1550.
RELIGION, HEALTH AND MEDICINE
. (3)
Introduces students to how people’s religious beliefs and practices influence their perspectives on health and their approaches to medical care and treatment. In units arranged by religion or region (North American indigenous religion, African religion, Hinduism, Chinese religion, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), students will learn how religious beliefs and practices relate to rites of passage, sexuality, women’s health, diet, mental health, trauma, and end of life issues. In addition to assessing students’ knowledge of the relationship between religion and perspectives on health and medical care and treatment, course assignments will raise students awareness of how people with different worldviews interact. Course requirements or activities also will teach them how to evaluate their own biases and how to assess the biases and credibility of various sources of information about religion, health, and medicine found on the Internet and elsewhere.

RELG 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

RELG 2110.
EASTERN RELIGIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Provides an academic overview of the major religious traditions of Asia, which may include the religions of India (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, China (Daoism and Confucianism, Chan Buddhism), and Japan (Shinto and Zen Buddhism). Students will be assigned both primary and secondary texts.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

RELG 2120.
WESTERN RELIGIONS. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This is a survey course that will cover major religious traditions of the West, including the three Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and other religious systems. The course will focus on how each tradition has developed historically and how it exists in the world today.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

RELG 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


SIGN - SIGN LANGUAGE 

SIGN 2125.
INTRODUCTION TO SIGN LANGUAGE. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
An introductory level language course in the language of the American Deaf Culture. Content includes ASL vocabulary and conversational skills; linguistic features of ASL; and skills in narrative/storytelling. In‐class activities, comprehension and expressive examinations, narrative and storytelling assignments in addition to semester projects are venues for students to demonstrate their learning. In addition, Deaf Culture and Deaf Community issues are addressed.

SIGN 2210.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I. (3)
Prerequisite: 2125.
Restriction: permission of program coordinator.
This course in American Sign Language is designed to develop the students’ receptive, expressive and conversational skills. Students will also develop narrative skills in application of these receptive and expressive skills. ASL vocabulary and linguistic features are introduced, as well as fundamental concepts about the Deaf community and culture.

SIGN 2220.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II. (3)
Prerequisite: 2210.
Restriction: permission of program coordinator.
A continuation course that builds on concepts and skills developed in 2210. Students gain further exposure to ASL structure and grammar, and Deaf culture and the Deaf community. Emphasis is on increasing students’ ability to comprehend other signers and express themselves with more elaboration when conversing or presenting in ASL.


SOCI - SOCIOLOGY 

SOCI 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and theories of sociology, as well as to the methods utilized in sociological research. The course will address how sociological concepts and theories can be utilized to analyze and interpret our social world, and how profoundly our society and the groups to which students belong influence them. Students will be given the opportunity to challenge their “taken for granted” or “common sense” understandings about society, social institutions, and social issues. Special attention will also be paid to the intimate connections between their personal lives and the larger structural features of social life. In addition, the implications of social inequalities, such as race/ethnicity, gender, and social class will be central to the course’s examination of social life in the United States. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOCI 1996.
TOPICS
.  (1-6, no limit Δ)

SOCI 2120.
INTRODUCTION CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. (3)
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.
This course provides an introduction to social issues that are currently affecting the criminal justice system in the United States. The course will cover the history of the U.S. criminal justice system and how our system compares with other countries. We will address how the U.S. criminal justice system attempts to create and preserve a balance between sustaining order, maintaining individual rights, and promoting justice. Important themes also include, but are not limited to discussions of how crime and delinquency are measured, key correlates of crime, sociological approaches to researching crime, sociological theories of crime, the quality of crime data in the U.S. and how it is used to make public policy decisions, and the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the United States.

SOCI 2210.
SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE. (3)
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.
This course is designed to provide an overview of the study of deviance and social control from multiple sociological perspectives. The instructor will present how sociologists research deviance and social control and the ethical issues involved in studying human subjects involved in these activities. The course also examines central sociological theories for understanding the causes of deviant behavior.

SOCI 2310.
CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS. (3)
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110
This course studies the nature, scope, and effects of social problems and their solutions. The course will concentrate on sociological perspectives, theories, and key concepts when investigating problems, such as inequality, poverty, racism, alienation, family life, sexuality, gender, urbanization, work, aging, crime, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and mass media. This course is designed to build students’ sociological understanding of how sociological approaches attempt to clarify various issues confronting contemporary life, as well as how sociologists view solutions to these problems.

SOCI 2315.
THE DYNAMICS OF PREJUDICE. (3)
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110
This course is designed to help students understand how attitudes and beliefs of individuals shape intergroup relations and their impacts on the daily lives of individuals as well as the effects that these beliefs have on the larger social structure of American society. We will examine how profoundly our society and the groups to which we belong, influence us and our beliefs and ultimately how these beliefs shape prejudice in our society. In this course, students are encouraged to challenge ideologies that are considered "common sense" or that are taken for granted and this in turn will allow them to critically engage issues in society such as racism, classism, sexism, and will leave with an understanding on how privilege affects our views on disability, LGBTQ issues, religion and immigration. Rather than investigating these themes in the abstract, students will identify and unpack how these larger structural issues play integral roles in their everyday lives, interactions, and existence. Ultimately, this course aims to address the social inequalities that exists in our society as a result of prejudice and will challenge students to identify and engage in strategies to work towards changing these aspects of society.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOC 2340.
GLOBAL ISSUES. (3)
Prerequisite: SOCI 1110
Many of the problems we face on a daily basis are global in scope and global in origin. The world is now more interconnected than ever. The things that happen in China or in Saudi Arabia affect us in the United States, just as the things that we do here affect the people in Russia or Egypt. This course offers a sociological perspective on this phenomenon of globalization and explores its origins in the culture of capitalism. To this end, we will examine topics such as consumption, labor, migration and immigration, economic inequality, the natural environment, and health. We will also consider various ways in which these problems can, or cannot, be solved for us and for future generations. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOCI 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


SOWK - SOCIAL WORK 

SOWK 2110
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES AND SOCIAL WORK. (3)
Pre- or Co requisite: ENGL 1110.
An overview of the care givers, the delivery systems, and the types of services provided within the field of Human Services, with particular emphasis on the development of the field and the roles and functions performed by these “new professionals.”


SPANISH (SPAN)

SPAN 1110.
SPANISH I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
Designed for students with little exposure to Spanish, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. During this course, students perform better and stronger in the Novice-Mid level while some abilities emerge in the Novice High range. This is an introductory course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish in everyday familiar situations via recognition and production of practiced or memorized words, phrases, and simple sentences. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 1120.
SPANISH II. (3)
Designed for students with some degree of exposure to Spanish in high school and/or at home, this course continues to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines, although a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate Low Level. Students in this course communicate in Spanish in familiar topics using a variety of words, phrases, simple sentences and questions that have been highly practiced and memorized.  Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 1125.
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: SPAN 1110 or 1120 or 1210 or 1220
This third-semester Spanish course emphasizes oral communication, idiomatic usage and the development of vocabulary, with a review of basic syntax. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

SPAN 1210.
SPANISH FOR HERITAGE LEARNERS I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This is a beginning-level Spanish course designed for students who have a cultural connection to the Spanish language. Some students have had very little exposure to the language and enter the class to develop beginning-level skills. Other students may have grown up hearing the heritage language in the community and may understand some Spanish and speak at a basic level as a result. The objective is to draw upon the connection to the heritage language as a source of motivation and engagement for our learning communities. At the same time, we build upon the language base that students may already have as a result of their heritage learner experience in order to develop new proficiencies in Spanish and reactivate the Spanish that students have learned previously. By the end of this course, students will be able to describe their home, campus surroundings and common activities including cultural traditions. At the same time, students gain cultural competency and develop a critical understanding of their linguistic and cultural background.

SPAN 1220.
SPANISH FOR HERITAGE LEARNERS II. (3)
A second semester class designed for students who have developed some basic Spanish proficiency from previous classes and/or from community experiences. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Class activities are designed to strengthen oral communication skills (speaking and listening) through a variety of group activities. By the end of the course students will be able to understand and produce narrations of past events in oral and written Spanish. In order to foster a desire to revitalize and maintain the Spanish language in the US context we attempt to raise students’ critical awareness of what it means to be part of a specific speech community. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 1996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)

SPAN 2110.
SPANISH III. (3)
This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). This is an intermediate course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish on familiar topics about self, others and everyday life at the same time that they recognize and handle short social interactions in interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 2120.
SPANISH IV. (3)
This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Intermediate High Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). This is an intermediate course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish on familiar topics about self, others and everyday life at the same time that they recognize and handle short social interactions in interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SPAN 2125.
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II. (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 2110 or 2120 or 2210 or 2220.
A conversational Spanish course designed for the "intermediate" level student. The course provides intensive conversation practice and a review of selected grammar items. It emphasizes vocabulary expansion and enhancement.

SPAN 2210.
SPANISH FOR HERITAGE LEARNERS III. (3)
A third semester course designed for students who have been raised in a Spanish-speaking environment and speak, or understand, some Spanish as a result of hearing it in the home, and in the community by family, friends, and neighbors. Students in this course will continue to develop their ability to narrate events in the past and will be able to describe hypothetical situations. Students will also develop their ability to express wishes, desires, and necessities. This course will help the student build confidence in their Spanish abilities and expand the language use in the areas of writing, reading, oral production and listening comprehension. In order to foster a desire to revitalize and maintain the Spanish language we attempt to raise students’ critical awareness of wider issues facing Spanish speakers in the US context.

SPAN 2220.
SPANISH FOR HERITAGE LEARNERS IV. (3)
A fourth-semester course designed for students who have been raised in a Spanish-speaking environment and speak, or understand, Spanish as a result of having heard it in the home and in the community. It is also for students with a cultural connection to heritage language speech communities or who have achieved proficiency from study in previous courses. This course will help the student build confidence in their Spanish abilities and expand the language use in the areas of writing, reading, oral production and listening comprehension. In addition to scaffolding skills that students already have, in this class they will expand their ability to describe abstract and hypothetical situations. Students will write essays, reaction papers, and creative pieces. Students will also examine formal and informal contexts of language use in speaking and writing. By studying the cultural and historical background shared by students as part of the program, students will develop an increased critical awareness of Spanish language speech communities. Meets University of New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 6: Second Language.

SSPAN 2996.
TOPICS
. (1-6, no limit Δ)


STIN - STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION

Student must be admitted to the STIN program to enroll in any course.

STIN 200.
STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION PRINCPLES I. (3)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
To lay the groundwork for student success, this foundational course introduces the key concepts that will be taught throughout the program, namely, the five principles of structural integration: holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration. These principles will be explored on both macro and micro level; we will progress from global understanding of the concepts behind them to specific techniques for their application. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering.

STIN 201.
STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION PRINCIPLES II. (3)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on introducing the five principles of structural integration--holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration--and how to apply them to the first three sessions with a client, from macro (global) to micro (specific techniques) applications. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering. This course is the second week of foundational classes (paired with STIN 200) in establishing key concepts that will be taught throughout the program and preparing students for success in the program.

STIN 202.
STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION PRINCIPLES III. (3)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on introducing the principles of structural integration-- holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration—vital for sessions four through six. We will explore these concepts on both a macro and micro level, gaining an understanding not only of their global applications but also specific techniques to apply them. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering. This course is a foundational class in establishing key concepts to prepare student for sessions four through six.

STIN 203.
STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION PRINCIPLES IV. (3)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on introducing the principles of structural integration pertinent to sessions seven through ten, laying the groundwork for the next three courses (each of which will focus on one of these sessions). Students will explore holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration on both a macro and micro level, studying these concepts generally but also learning specific techniques to apply them. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering.

STIN 204.
STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION PRINCIPLES V. (3)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session ten in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. Students will learn how to apply the principles of structural integration--holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration--from a macro to micro application. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom. This is the final course in the program.

STIN 210.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION I. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session one in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. We will cover assessment of a client/model, anatomy specific to session one, and the application of the overarching theme of adaptability. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 220.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION II. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session two in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. We will cover the assessment of a client/model, anatomy specific to session two, and the application of the overarching theme of support. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 230
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION III. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session three in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf, covering the assessment of a client/model, anatomy specific to session three, and the application of the overarching theme of resonance. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement, dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 240.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION IV. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session four in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. We will cover assessment of a client/model, specific anatomy to session four and the application of the overarching theme of support. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 250.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION V. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session five in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. We will assess a client/model, study anatomy specific to session five, and practice the application of the overarching theme of support and adaptability. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models/clients in classroom.

STIN 260.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION VI. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session six in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. Students will learn how to apply the principles of structural integration--holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration--from a macro to micro application. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 270.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION VII. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session seven in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. Students will learn how to apply the principles of structural integration--holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration--from a macro to micro application. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 280.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION VIII. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session eight in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. Students will learn how to apply the principles of structural integration--holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration--from a macro to micro application. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.

STIN 290.
INTEGRATION & PRACTICE SESSION IX. (2)
Restriction: student must be admitted to STIN program.
This course will focus on session nine in the lineage of the 10 series by Dr. Ida Rolf. Students will learn how to apply the principles of structural integration--holism, adaptability, support, resonance and integration--from a macro to micro application. Students will learn through didactic lecture, experiential movement and dyad partnering and application on two models in classroom.


SUST SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (SUST)

SUST 1134.
INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLITY STUDIES
. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides a broad survey of various aspects of sustainability. Students will explore topics such as climate change, renewable energy, water, agriculture, green building, socially responsible business, micro lending, environmental justice, smart growth and alternative progress indicators. Students will examine both contemporary challenges to sustainable development and examples of successful sustainability initiatives on local, national, and global levels.

SUST 2110.
CLIMATE CHANGE SUSTAINABILITY
. (3)
Restriction:  Instructor permission.
At the nexus of science, society, and sustainability, this course is an in-depth exploration of the causes and consequences of modern global warming.  Topics include stakeholder analysis, environmental justice, economics, politics, energy sources, adaptation and mitigation at local, national and global scales.  In the past, humanity was transformed by the Agricultural, Industrial, and Technological Revolutions.  We are currently undergoing an Energy Revolution with direct consequences on the climate crisis.  Will it be in time to stabilize the rapidly changing hydrological and ecological systems upon which Earth’s biodiversity depends?  The one-week session engages students in experiential learning, direct observation and intense study of topics.  Students will gain and demonstrate a mastery of these topics through reading, writing and discussion; guest speakers; field trips; activities; and student presentations.  By the end of the course, students will understand: the science of global warming and climate change, the scope of adaptations and mitigations available to us, and the challenge and opportunity of the Energy Revolution. 


THEA - THEATER 

THEA 1110.
INTRODUCTION TO THEATER. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None.
This course provides an introduction to the study of theatre. Students will examine various components that comprise theatre, such as acting, directing, playwriting, dramaturgy, scenic and costume design, stagecraft, spectatorship, history, theory, and criticism.  Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities


TRST - TRANSITIONAL STUDIES


TRST 101.
COLLEGE SUCCESS. (3)

This course is designed to help equip students for success in college. We will help students to understand their own strengths, weaknesses, interests, and priorities in order that they might make informed decisions regarding courses of study and career paths. We will seek to develop the skills necessary to succeed as students, as parents, and as powerful and active members of the community.


UNIV - UNIVERSITY 

UNIV 102.
TOPICS: ACADEMIC FOUNDATIONS
. (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ).Designed to engage students who share academic interests, with their intended major, college or school.

UNIV 105.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE INTERDISCIPLINARY CO-OP. (0)
Restriction: Academic advisement approval required.
Exploring the world of work and interacting with their surroundings in an environment conducive to growth and personal development, UNM students will benefit from real life situations through experiential learning.  

UNIV 201.
TOPICS IN CAREER EXPLORATION
. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)
Both general and discipline-specific sections offered. Students will explore their goals, passions, and skills, and the steps and
tools related to career decision-making (general seminar). In the discipline-specific sections, students will explore specific career options.


WW - WOODWORKING 

WW 101.
BASIC WOODWORKING I. (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee. (does not include student materials)
This course introduces students to the joys of working wood. Including: hand and power tool safety, stock preparation and basic joinery techniques.

WW 108.
WOOD LAMINATION AND BENDING. (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101
Introduces lamination for creating large forms and bent forms. Includes: forms, clamping, laminated joinery and decorative lamination.

WW 110.
FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101. Lab fee. (Does not include student materials)
Creating furniture from conception to complete work! Includes: history of furniture design, drawing furniture, woods, joinery, construction techniques and shop safety.

WW 111.
CABINET BUILDING. (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101
This course focuses on all aspects of cabinet millwork and construction. Topics include casework, frame and panel components, cabinet supports, doors, drawers, and cabinet and tabletops. Upon completion students should be able to perform all functions necessary to construct basic cabinets.

WW 113.
SPANISH COLONIAL FURNITURE. (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101. Lab fee. (Does not include student materials)
Lab-based course in design, carving and building Spanish Colonial Furniture using traditional styles and methods.

WW 116.
CHAIR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101 and 110
For students that have already constructed tales. Includes: history, chair design, engineering, machining, assembly and finish.

WW 117.
WOOD CARVING . (3)
Pre- or corequisites: None. Lab fee. (Does not include student materials)
Wood carving is a form of woodworking by means of a cutting tool (knife) in one hand or a chisel by two hands or with one hand on a chisel and one hand on a mallet, resulting in a wooden figure or figurine, or in the sculptural ornamentation of a wooden object. Students will work on individual projects using techniques learned in class.

WW 118.
WOOD CARVING II . (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101 and 110 Instructor permission. Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)
Introduces veneering, coopering, compound-angle joinery, and laminate bending. Students design and build an original piece of furniture.

WW 120.
WOODWORKING SHOP . (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101, 110 and 111. Lab fee. (Does not include student materials)
This course is for student who have completed basic woodworking courses and are prepared to work on individual projects.

WW 135.
WOOD SCULPTURE . (3)
Prerequisite: 101. Lab fee. (Does not include student materials) An introduction to wood sculpting. Includes: history, wood varieties, safety, tools, and techniques using solid and laminated wood blocks. 

WW 293.
TOPICS . (3)