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Advising


1157 County Road 110
Ranchos de Taos, NM 87557

Phone: (575) 737-6202

Course Descriptions

(Please note that all courses are not offered every semester. Please check the UNM-Taos Course Schedule to see which courses are being offered each semester.)

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ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

AAST 111
BEGINNING KEYBOARDING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Presentation of keyboarding by the touch method and the development of basic word processing operations.

AAST 112
KEYBOARD APPLICATIONS. (3)
Prerequisite: 111
Lab fee

This course is designed to help students develop skills and knowledge in the preparation of various types of business correspondence (memos, letters, reports, etc.), in the preparation of statistical communications, and in special development and control in the operation of the computer.

AAST 124
INTRODUCTION TO WORD PROCESSING. (3)
Prerequisite: 111
Lab fee

An introductory course designed to acquaint students with basic concepts of word processing. Students will learn to create, edit, file, retrieve and print various types of documents produced in an office.

AAST 134
INTERMEDIATE WORD PROCESSING. (3)
Prerequisite: 124
Lab fee

An individual laboratory course used to develop proficiency on word processing and microcomputer equipment and software. Types of lessons include document assembly, multi- page documents, page formatting, tables, and math columns.

AAST 205.
BUSINESS MATH/ELECTRONIC CALCULATORS. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Teaches the touch method of operating office adding and calculating machines. Basic operating instructions and realistic problems from simple addition and subtraction to complex calculations are included for both ten-key and electronic calculators.

AAST 220.
BUSINESS MATH. (3)
Prerequisite: None

The Business Math course is designed to strengthen mathematical skills as well as to expand their understanding of mathematical terms relating to the business arena.

AAST 224.
ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING/DESKTOP PUBLISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: 134
Lab fee

This course is designed to refine word processing skills then progress to desktop publishing. Students will create letterheads, design menus, create brochures and forms, and develop newsletters.

AAST 230.
BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to help students develop verbal communication skills in a business environment and in composing various business letters, reports, proposals, minutes, and other types of written communication.

AAST 240.
MACHINE TRANSCRIPTIONS. (3)
Prerequisites: 112, 134 and 230
Lab fee

An individual laboratory course that teaches the mechanics of machine transcription of dictated materials. Knowledge of grammar, punctuation and capitalization along with good spelling capability is needed to successfully transcribe dictated materials.

AAST 250.
RECORDS MANAGEMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Teaches the principles, methods and procedures for the selection, operation, and control of records systems. Students will be made aware of established filing rules as well as changing trends in records management.

AAST 260.
BUSINESS APPLICATIONS ON COMPUTER. (3)
Prerequisite: 111 and 124
Lab fee

Computer-based course in sole proprietor business applications. Includes computer use in accounting, planning, organizing, managing, and communicating.

AAST 262.
LEGAL/MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION. (3)
Prerequisites: 112, 134, 230 and 240
Lab fee

This course is designed to familiarize students with legal/medical terminology, layout, formatting, and the transcribing of legal and medical documents using correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

AAST 264.
LEGAL OFFICE PROCEDURES. (3)
Prerequisites: 134
Lab fee

Legal Offices Procedures is designed to utilize a project-based approach to completing legal office activities. The projects will allow a hands- on approach offering the legal administrative assistant student the ability to perform in a simulated environment.

AAST 265.
MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES. (3)
Prerequisite: 112

This course provides students with a brief overview and understanding of the business of dentistry and other medical fields. Included will be management of patient records, graphical charting, overdue accounts, appointment scheduling, billing and receipting, and handling insurance claims with ADA codes. The above skills will help to enhance patient service, streamline practice operations, increase treatment acceptance, and improve the financial bottom line.

AAST 271.
OFFICE ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course will provide a background in the basic accounting procedures used to operate a business. The accounting procedures presented will serve as a sound background for enjoyment in office jobs as well as preparation for studying advanced business courses in college. Office Accounting Procedures will cover financial reports, the double-entry accounting system, the accounting cycle, and payroll.

AAST 272.
COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING. (3)
Prerequisites: 271
Lab fee

Computerized Accounting will provide students with a realistic approach to computerized, integrated principles. The computer software used will process a wide variety of accounting tasks used to operate a business.

AAST 280.
INTERNSHIP. (4)
Prerequisites: Upon Completion of AAST program and Basic Educational requirements or Program Assistant permission.

This course is designed for students to work and gain experience in an approved office setting. Students are not paid for their work but are supervised jointly by instructor and employer.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 180.
INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduces 19th and 20th century American culture. Demonstrates interdisciplinary approaches to American culture studies. Content varies by semester and topics include popular culture, comparative studies of race and ethnicity, nationalism and citizenship, critical regionalism.

AMST 182.
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENT, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the socially and politically constructed values directing Americans’ attitudes toward nature, science and technology and to the impacts of those attitudes on built and natural environments regionally, nationally and globally.

AMST 183.
INTRODUCTION TO GENDER STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of the construction of gender as a category. Readings will span cross-cultural and historical materials, including literary, artistic and popular representations of masculinity and femininity in America.

AMST 184.
INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of basic concepts of popular culture and methods for its study. Source materials are drawn from diverse areas–television, film, comics, music and sports.

AMST 185.
INTRODUCTION TO RACE, CLASS AND ETHNICITY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An interdisciplinary introduction to the issues of race, class and ethnicity in American life and society.

AMST 186.
INTRODUCTION TO SOUTHWEST STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Provides both an introduction to the complex history and culture of the Southwestern United States and a demonstration of the possibilities of the interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in its content as it is multidisciplinary in its methodology.

AMST 200.
TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: None

The content of this course varies by semester. Topics include: America in the 50s; America in the 60s–70s; the American family; power and culture; schooling in America.

AMST 251.
THE CHICANO EXPERIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Investigation of the historical and social conditions that have shaped the development of Chicano life.

AMST 252.
THE NATIVE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. (3)
Prerequisite: None
(Also offered as NATV 252)

Introductory survey of Native American History, culture and contemporary issues. Students read literature by and about Native Americans covering a variety of topics including tribal sovereignty, federal policy, activism, economic development, education and community life.

AMST 285.
AMERICAN LIFE AND THOUGHT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Examination of the development of American cultural values and attitudes from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. Demonstrates the use of interdisciplinary modes of inquiry.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 101.
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Surveys the breadth of anthropology, introducing students to archaeology, biological anthropology, ethnology, human evolutionary ecology and linguistics. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences

ANTH 110.
LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND THE HUMAN ANIMAL. (3)
Prerequisite: None
(Also offered as LING 101.)

Fundamentals of anthropological linguistics. The biological, structural, psychological and social nature of language; implications for cross- cultural theory, research and applications.

ANTH 120.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Corequisites: 122L

Introduction to archaeological method and theory. Lectures cover basic concepts and strategy. Labs provide hands-on experience with methods of analyzing archaeological remains.

ANTH 122L.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: 120.

Introduction to archaeological method and theory. Labs provide hands-on experience with methods of analyzing archaeological remains.

ANTH 130.
CULTURES OF THE WORLD. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Basic concepts and methods of cultural anthropology. Selected cultures, ranging from preliterate societies to aspects of urban civilization. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area.

ANTH 150.
EVOLUTION AND HUMAN EMERGENCE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Fundamentals of biological anthropology and principles of organic evolution, in relation to the biology, ecology and behavior of primates and fossil humans. Biological anthropology concentrators are required, and others are encouraged, to enroll concurrently in 151L. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area.

ANTH 151.
HUMAN EVOLUTION LAB. (1)
Prerequisite: None

The factual basis of human evolution, from the comparative study of living and fossil primates to interpretation of recent human fossils.

ANTH 160.
HUMAN LIFE COURSE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity.

ANTH 220.
WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Surveys the archeological evidence for the development of human culture from the first stone tools in Africa to the rise of civilizations in both the Old and New Worlds.

ANTH 230.
TOPICS IN CURRENT ANTHROPOLOGY. (3, no limit)
Prerequisite: None

Experimental courses on topics of current interest.

ANTH 238.
CULTURES OF THE SOUTHWEST. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Basic concepts of cultural anthropology, illustrated with overviews of social and cultural patterns of Southwest Indians and Hispanics. Interethnic relations of these with other American populations. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

APPLIED ARTS AND CRAFTS

AAC. 130.
PUEBLO POTTERY TECHNIQUES. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee (does not include student materials)

This course will be a combination hands-on examination of the process of Pueblo pottery making and an exploration into the artistic traditions of the Native Americans. The class will gather, process and prepare the clay and related materials in much the same way that Native people have done for the last two thousand years in the American Southwest.

AAC 114.
METAL CASTING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee (does not include student materials)

The focus will explore, through a series of hands on projects, various casting processes and wax working techniques associated with small scale nonferrous metal casting for the purpose of both jewelry and sculpture.

AAC 142.
MONOTYPE. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee (does not include student materials)

This is an intermediate level course in printmaking with emphasis on the monotype process including additive and subtractive methods and multiple printing techniques using oil-based inks. The class will focus on safe and non-toxic printing procedures. Technical and aesthetic considerations will be addressed in one- on one instruction and group critique.

AAC 143.
SAFE ETCHING-INTAGLIO. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee (does not include student materials)

This is an intermediate course in Printmaking, concentrating on alternative non-toxic methods that replace traditional toxic materials. Techniques for both hard and soft grounds, lift processes and aquatint will be covered. Etching is an extremely versatile medium that allows for bold sculptural imagery, delicate line and subtle tonal.

AAC 166.
STILL LIFE. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee (does not include student materials)

In this class students will draw and paint still life imagery. They will explore how to represent still-life objects using realistic artistic techniques.

AAC 293.
TOPICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None Lab fee

Topics may vary.

ART HISTORY

ARTH 101.
INTRODUCTION TO ART. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A beginning course in the fundamental concepts of the visual arts; the language of form and the media of artistic expression. Readings and slide lectures supplemented by museum exhibition attendance. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ARTH 201.
HISTORY OF ART I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Prehistoric, Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic Art. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ARTH 202.
HISTORY OF ART II. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Western Art from the Early Renaissance to Impressionism. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

ARTH 250.
MODERN ART. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Major stylistic developments of European and American painting and sculpture from Impressionism to approximately World War II.

ARTH 251.
ARTISTIC TRADITIONS OF THE SOUTHWEST. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Interrelationships of Native American, Hispanic and Anglo cultures from prehistoric times to the present, emphasizing the major forms of expression–pottery, textiles, jewelry, architecture, painting and photography. Slide lectures supplemented by museum exhibits.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 106.
DRAWING I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Basic drawing concepts, including the expressive use of contour, value, perspective and composition while exploring both dry and wet media. Assigned problems may include still life, landscape, portraiture or the figure.

ARTS 121.
TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

Emphasis on elements of line, form, value, color theory, painting principles and visual vocabulary. Particular attention will be placed on a disciplined approach toward design and development of perceptual skills.

ARTS 187.
INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

This is a hands-on course introducing contemporary techniques, technologies, underlying concepts, and practitioners of fine art photography. ARTS 187 is a foundation course designed to prepare students for ARTS 188.

ARTS 188.
VISUALIZING IDEAS USING PHOTOGRAPH . (3)
Prerequisite: 187
Lab fee.

This course will help students use photography to develop their ideas conceptually. Students will work in both a traditional and an experimental manner with a variety of photographic processes and technologies to advance the visual presentation of their ideas.

ARTS 205.
DRAWING II. (3)
Prerequisite: 106
Lab fee.

Further concentration on basic drawing concepts with a greater emphasis on descriptive and perceptual drawing skills using both dry and wet media.

ARTS 207.
PAINTING I. (3)
Lab fee.

Painting materials and techniques, integrating basic drawing concepts with color theory and composition. Emphasis on descriptive and perceptual skills through assigned problems.

ARTS 257.
SMALL SCALE METAL CONSTRUCTION II. (3)
Prerequisite: 157
Lab Fee

A continuation of 157. Fabrication skills are further developed and refined. Emphasis is on developing a deeper understanding of form/content as it relates to intimate scale.

ARTS 125.
ART PRACTICES I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

This is an interdisciplinary course, exploring thematic concepts and diverse media that are central to the nature of art making today. Art Practices I will investigate issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK.

ARTS 126.
ART PRACTICES II. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

This is an interdisciplinary course, exploring thematic concepts and diverse media that are central to the nature of art making today. Art Practices II will investigate issues of MOTIVE and CHANGE.

ARTS 157.
SMALL SCALE METAL CONSTRUCTION I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee

Introduction to basic fabrication methods as they relate to object-making and small-scale sculpture.

ARTS 168.
INTRODUCTION TO CERAMICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

Comprehensive introduction to the terms, concepts, historical, and technical information that support creative development. Includes hand building and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, oxidation, reduction, and atmospheric firing.

ARTS 268.
CERAMICS: MATERIALS AND AESTHETICS. (3 to a maximum of 6) Prerequisite: 168
Lab Fee

Continuation of 168 with emphasis placed on the mastery of forming, surfacing, and firing processes, expanded critical awareness, and the development of a personal aesthetic. Open-ended and self-selected projects. Individual and group critiques.

ARTS 274.
INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING. (3)
Prerequisites: None
Lab Fee

Exploration of printmaking concepts and fundamental techniques, including monotype, monoprint, intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, calligraphy, and curatorial technique. Instruction includes lecture, demonstration, and critique.

ARTS 293.
TOPICS. (3)
Prerequisites: None Lab fee

Topics may vary.

ARTS AND SCIENCES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

ARSC 198.
INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDY (3)
Prerequisite: None

Variable content in an academic discipline. Develops academic skills through study of the content areas including scholarship, research, comprehension, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, application, critical thinking and communication of ideas.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 101.
INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Conceptual description of our fascinating universe: early astronomy, Newtonian synthesis, Earth, Moon, planets, asteroids, comets, the sun, our solar system, stars, black holes, galaxies, dark matter, dark energy and cosmological mysteries. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science

ASTR 101L.
ASTRONOMY LAB. (1)
Prerequisite or Corequisete: 101

Intended as an adjunct to ASTR 101, this course deals with elementary techniques in astronomical observations. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 110.
BIOLOGY NON-MAJORS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Biological principles important for the non- major in today’s world. Ecological, evolutionary and molecular topics. . (Credit not allowed for both 110 and 123/124L) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

BIOL 112L.
BIOLOGY LAB FOR NON- MAJORS. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: 110

An optional laboratory which may be taken concurrently with or subsequent to 110. One 3- hour lab per week including plant and animal diversity, techniques and investigation of current issues. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

BIOL 123.
BIOLOGY FOR HEALTH RELATED SCIENCES AND NON-MAJORS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Principles of cell biology, genetics and organismic biology. (Credit not allowed for both 123 and 110. Not accepted toward a Biology major.)

BIOL 124L.
BIOLOGY FOR HEALTH RELATED SCIENCES AND NON-MAJORS LAB. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: 123

One credit optional laboratory to accompany 123.

BIOL 201
MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY. (4)
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: Chemistry 121 and 123L

The scientific method, the role of water in cell biology, carbon and molecular diversity, macromolecules, introduction to metabolism, tour of cell structures and functions, membrane structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell communication and the cell cycle. , 1 discussion section.

BIOL 202.
GENETICS. (4)
Prerequisite: 201 and CHEM 121 and 123L or CHEM131L
Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 122 and 124L or CHEM132L.
(Credit not allowed for both BIOL 202 and 221)

Mitosis, meiosis, Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and inheritance, molecular basis of inheritance, genes to proteins, genetic models (viruses and bacteria), eukaryotic genomes, genetic basis of development and overview of genomes. , 1 discussion section.

BIOL 203L.
ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION. (4)
Prerequisite: 202 and CHEM 132L or 122 and 124L
Pre- or corequisite: MATH 162 or 180.

Darwinian principles, origin of the earth, the fossil record and diversification of ancient life, evolution of populations, origin of species, phylogenetics, introduction to ecology and the biosphere, behavioral ecology, population ecology, community ecology, ecosystem ecology and conservation biology. 3 hour lab. Lab material includes a survey of the diversity of life.

BIOL 204L.
PLANT AND ANIMAL FORM AND FUNCTION. (4)
Prerequisites: 202 and CHEM 132L or CHEM 122L and 124L

Introduction to plant systems including: structure, growth, transport, nutrition, reproduction, development, and control systems. Introduction to animal systems including nutrition, circulation, reproduction, development; and immune, control and nervous systems and 3 hour lab.

BIOL 225
NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND POLICY. (4) Prerequisites: None

Students will develop an understanding of resources management policies, principles and on the ground practices of the major federal land management agencies in the United States. Students will also develop an understanding of the history and political and sociological development of the major natural resources managing agencies in the United States.

BIOL 237.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I. for the Health Science (3) Prerequisite: 123 and 124L or 201 and CHEM 111L or CHEM 121 and CHEM 123L

An integrated study of human structure and function to include histology, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.

BIOL 238.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II. (3)
Prerequisite: 237

A continuation of 237 to include cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive and endocrine systems.

BIOL 239L.
MICROBIOLOGY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES. (4)
Prerequisite: 123 and 124L and CHEM 111L or 121 and 123L or 201 and CHEM 111L or 121 and 123L

Introduction to microbiology with emphasis on principles of infection and immunity. Not accepted toward a Biology major or minor. (Credit not allowed for both 239L and 351– 352L.)

BIOL 247L.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY I. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: 237

Laboratory work using cadavers. Anatomy stressed with appropriate physiological work. Topics integrated with 237.

BIOL 248L.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY II. (1)
Pre- or corequisite: 238

Continuation of BIOL 247L. Topics integrated with 238.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 111.
ELEMENTS OF GENERAL CHEMISTRY. (4)
Prerequisite: ACT=>22 or SAT=>510 or MATH 120 or 121 or MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 163 or MATH 180 or MATH 181 or MATH 264.

One-semester course in general chemistry, especially for non-science majors in the health sciences except premedicine and medical technology. (Credit not allowed for both 111 and 121 and 123L.) Three lectures, 3 hours demo lab/recitation. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

CHEM 121.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I. (3)
Pre- or Corequisite: 123L

Introduction to the chemical and physical behavior of matter. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

CHEM 122.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II. (3)
Pre- or Co-requisite: 124L

Continuation of 121L. Prerequisite 121L with grade of C or better. 3 hrs. lab.

123L.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or Co-requisite: 121

Introduction to basic chemical laboratory principles and techniques.

124L.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or Co-requisite: 122

Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. (3 hour lab)

CHEM 212.
INTEGRATED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY. (4) Prerequisite: 111 or 121.
(Credit not allowed for both 212 and 301.)

Survey interrelating the major principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry with special emphasis toward interests of students in the health sciences.

CLASSICAL STUDIES

CLST 107.
GREEK MYTHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
(Also offered as English 107)

Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English.

CLST 204.
GREEK CIVILIZATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Greece. Lectures on Greek art, history, literature and philosophy.

CLST 205
ROMAN CIVILIZATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Rome. Lectures on Roman literature, history, art and philosophy.

COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM

CJ 101.
INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Principles and concepts of various types of human communication including interpersonal, small group, organizational, public and mass communication. Two hours lecture, 1 hr. lab.

CJ 110.
INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

The development of the mass media with emphasis on television in the areas of programming, policy, regulations, economics and technology. Examination of the social, cultural and political impact of the mass media on contemporary society.

CJ 115.
COMMUNICATIONS ACROSS CULTURES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to communication among people from different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing intercultural relations. The class seeks to identify, honor and enhance the strengths of different cultural perspectives.

CJ 130.
PUBLIC SPEAKING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A performance course that deals with the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

CJ 171L.
INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Practical introduction to journalism, emphasizing journalistic conventions and the gathering and writing of news for the print and broadcast media. Language and typing skills required.

CJ 220.
COMMUNICATION FOR TEACHERS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Concepts and practices of interpersonal, small group and public communication pertinent to classroom teachers at the elementary, middle and secondary levels of education.

CJ 221.
INTERPERSONAL COMMUICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Analysis of a variety of interpersonal communication concepts, with special emphasis on the application of communication skills in different situations. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

CJ 225.
SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Basic characteristics and patterns of communication in small groups. Includes attention to role theory, conflict resolution and creative decision-making methods.

CJ 268.
MEDIA THEORIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to theories of mass media and their influences.

CJ 269.
MULTIMEDIA AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: 171L

Exploration of visual images in the mass media, with emphasis on the design and theory of mediated imaging. Includes some practical training in still photography and video.

CJ 278.
WRITING AND EDITING FOR MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM. (3) Prerequisite: 171L

Continuation of CJ 171L with increased emphasis of how to write on platforms available to the modern journalist. Writing workshop for web, broadcast, print and magazine.

CJ 279.
WEB DESIGN. (3)

Introduction to writing and designing electronic publications using personal computers and online publishing software. Emphasizes use of graphics and text to communicate with users of the Internet. Competency with personal computers required.

CJ 293.
TOPICS (1-3 TO A MAXIMUM OF 6)

Topics may vary.

COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

CRP 165.
COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING, INTRODUCTION. (3) Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the social, economic, political and physical factors involved in the development of cities and towns. Emphasis on the nature of urban form as a reflection of the prevailing past and present political economy of society.

CRP 181.
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Development of the major issues, concepts and methods emerging from the relationship of social systems and the natural environment.

CRP 203
SOCIETY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to environmental and natural resource issues of both global and local scale. Investigates basic causes and consequences of environmental problems, including interrelated physical and social science dimensions.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 150L.
COMPUTING FOR BUSINESS STUDENTS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 120 or 121 or 122 or 123 or 150 or 162 or 163 or 180 or 181.
Lab fee

Students will use personal computers in campus laboratories to learn use of a word processor, a spreadsheet and a database management program. The course will also cover access to the World Wide Web and other topics of current importance to business students. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science.

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

CT 102.
INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Students will be introduced to basic word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications. Hands-on exercises as well as classroom discussion will be utilized to provide beginners with a solid foundation for further computer study.

CT 106L.
MICROSOFT WORD. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The student will be introduced to advanced word processing techniques using Microsoft Word. The class content involves document design and formatting as well as file management. A great emphasis will be put on efficiency in applications.

CT 107L.
MICROSOFT EXCEL. (3)
Prerequisite: 102L or equivalent Windows experience.
Lab fee

The course introduces the student to the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application. Beginning and more advanced topics will be offered. Course content includes spreadsheet layout and design as well as file management.

CT 108L.
POWERPOINT. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Learning Power Point Pro starts with basics. Students will become familiar with PowerPoint screens and the various screen elements. Then students will learn the fundamentals of creating effective multimedia presentations. By the end of the course, students will create their own presentations using their own information.

CT 109L.
DESKTOP PUBLISHING I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Students will learn desktop publishing in a production environment using the Macintosh computer. Course content includes page layout and design using text and graphics as well as file management.

CT 110L.
DIGITAL IMAGERY I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The course introduces students to computer graphics on the Macintosh computer using Adobe Photoshop. Students will create, modify, and prepare various computer-generated raster image documents. Course content includes document scanning and resizing as well as producing digital artwork.

CT 111L.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND DRAFTING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This entry-level course is intended for the technician or draftsperson interested in the use of CADD in an engineering environment. The course will acquaint the student with the AutoCAD electronic drafting program for IBM- PC’s and address basic techniques associated with Architectural Desktop. The student will be familiarized with basic aspects of CADD from program initiation through hard copy output (plotting) of rudimentary AutoCAD drawings.

CT 112L.
INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT ACCESS. (3)
Prerequisite: 102L or equivalent Windows experience.
Lab fee

The student will be introduced to the Microsoft Access database application. Database concepts, application, and design will be emphasized. Content includes ongoing database management.

CT 113LT.
MULTI-MEDIA I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Students will learn multimedia publishing using the Macintosh computer and Adobe Premiere to produce presentations combining sound, animation and text for a variety of output mediums. Course content includes sound editing, image capture and presentation design.

CT 114L.
INTRODUCTION TO WORLD WIDE WEB PUBLISHING. (3) Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The course introduces students to producing World Wide Web home pages for publication on the Internet using the Macintosh computer. Students will gain experience in browsing the World Wide Web as well as designing, writing, and maintaining web pages. Content includes HTML, links and URLs, images, sound, and video.

CT 115L.
VECTOR GRAPHICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The course introduces the student to using various vector graphic images in publishing. The student will gain experience in creating, modifying, and preparing graphic images as well as knowledge of a roper operating environment.

CT 116L.
FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAPHIC DESIGN. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This is a core course that allows the student to understand the visual dynamics of Graphic Design. The emphasis of this course is on drawing and composition. This is a course in design aesthetic that will allow the student to experience the theory and practices of 2- dimensional design throughout history. Areas to be covered: typography, the golden ratio, design, composition, line, shape, space and color concepts.

CT 125.
INTRO TO MACINTOSH. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee
(Previously CT 105LT).

Overview and demonstration of Macintosh and its programs. Topics include the Macintosh operating system (file and folder management, using disks, system preferences settings), and the basics of typical applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, desktop publishing, databases, and web browsing.

CT 170.
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The student will be introduced to the Internet and its capabilities. The course is designed for the beginner with no prior knowledge of computers or the Internet. Content includes an introduction to Email, Telnet, and the World Wide Web.

CT 171L.
INTERMEDIATE INTERNET. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The course is a continuation of CT 170 for students seeking additional Internet skills. Emphasis is on using the Internet effectively for accessing and searching its vast resources. Content includes Email, Gopher, Telnet, FTP, World Wide Web, and UNIX.

CT 173L.
MARKETING ON THE INTERNET. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Students will be introduced to marketing concepts as they relate to the Internet. The course is a nontechnical approach to producing online sales and product information as well as customer relations and support. Content includes familiarization with the World Wide Web and its capabilities and limitations.

CT 175L.
PLANNING AND DESIGNING WEBSITES. (3)
Prerequisites 110 and 170
Co requisite: 114
Lab fee

In order to build a web site that is both attractive and logical, one must understand the basic principles of web design and planning. This class will cover the skeleton of web design and give the students needed skills to take raw material and transform the material into a web site.

CT 190L.
DESKTOP PUBLISHING 2. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee
The student will gain experience in planning, implementing, and managing professional desktop publishing projects. Course content includes pricing, assembling, and profitability in the publishing environment.

CT 191L.
ADVANCED WORLD WIDE WEB PUBLISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The course is a continuation of CT 114L and furthers the students knowledge of WWW publishing. Students will gain experience with animation, audio, image maps, and a variety of other advanced topics.

CT 195L.
DIRECTED STUDIES/GRAPHIC DESIGN. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Will be available to students focusing on Digital Graphic Design certificates. It will be an open lab where the student can focus on a specific area of study.

CT 199L.
ADVANCED DESKTOP PUBLISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

This is an advanced graphic design course. The student will gain experience in planning, implementing and managing professional desktop publishing projects. The topics studied will be pricing, assembling, and profitability in a publishing environment.

CT 207L.
QUICKBOOKS. (3)
Prerequisite: CT 102L or equivalent Window experience.
Lab fee

QuickBooks Pro is the most popular personal and business accounting program in the country. Knowledge of this program can give students command of their personal and business data, along with job and career possibilities.

CT 210L.
DIGITAL IMAGERY II. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course focuses on several areas of Photoshop that are key to producing quality print and web images such as: color editing by selection techniques and curves control, making professional composition of images using Photoshop layers, how to handle different types of file extension, how to convert them, and how to handle large file sizes.

CT 211L.
ADVANCED WEB DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course will guide the student through the fields of system administration, advanced web programming, advanced coding, and development techniques. This course will also present techniques on marketing the student’s skills.

CT 212L. INTERMEDIATE MICROSOFT ACCESS. (3)
Prerequisite: 112L.
Lab fee

Students will review basic concepts taught in the CT 112L Introduction to Microsoft Access course. The review will be in the form of a project and the student can work and ask questions towards completing the project. In addition, Intermediate Access will also concentrate on advanced reporting, queries, and the use of Macros in the development of forms.

CT 213L.
MULTIMEDIA II. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Multimedia 2 is to provide the student with further knowledge of Multimedia using Adobe Premiere Pro. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have a basic understanding of multimedia editing.

CT 216L.
DIRECTED STUDIES/MULTIMEDIA. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Seminar will be available to students focusing on Digital Graphic Design Certificates. It will be an open lab where the student can focus on a specific area of study.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

CNST 101.
LAYOUT AND FRAMING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A study of wood and construction techniques. Wall, roof and deck framing, planning layout and study of stress on structural members. Classroom and lab experience.

CNST 103.
EXTERIOR FINISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A study of exterior trim techniques, selection of doors and windows, methods of installation. Includes overview of paint, stains, and prefabricated materials.

CNST 105.
INTERIOR FINISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A study of the interior of a building which includes methods of wall, ceiling, and floor finishing. The use of different types of covering, paint, paneling, and texture will be emphasized. The installation of decorative tile for bathroom, kitchen, and floors will be explored.

CNST 109.
PLUMBING THEORY I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Introduction to plumbing occupations, safety, tools, equipment, and human relations in the plumbing trade. Covers plumbing components, sizes of various residential and commercial plumbing systems, pipe fitting and joining, and cost estimating.

CNST 111.
REMODELING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to focus on key factors underlying hidden costs. Hopefully we will visit remodeling jobs, in process, to see the surprise factors in action.

CNST 112.
OWNER BUILT HOME. (3)

An introduction to the construction of your own home, with or without the use of architects, designers, and contractors. Including design, legal, and financial considerations of such a project.

CNST 115.
CONCRETE POURING AND FINISHING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A study of the use of concrete in building construction. The use of power tools and hand tools to finish walls and poured work.

CNST 118.
ALTERNATIVE BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An overview and evaluation of construction techniques and systems currently in use in the Southwest. The course will include poured pumice, hay bale, and stacked tire techniques, solar, and low cost considerations. This class will visit representative construction sites.

CNST 120.
PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICITY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Study of AC and DC circuits and components. Practical applications of electrical principles and practice on circuit boards. Use of calculations derived from formulas of electrical functions. Working principles and proper use of various electrical motors. Classroom with lab experience.

CNST 121.
ELECTRICAL WIRING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This introductory course will be useful for students preparing to become electricians for do- it-yourselfers who would like to install and repair their own electrical systems. The course will teach the basic theory of electricity, electrical terms, measuring electricity, electrical wires, and electrical devices.

CNST 125.
SOLAR DESIGN. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course will educate students about renewable energy and how to use solar energy for heating cooling, hot water, cooking, and electrical power. Hands on activities are integrated throughout the course. The curriculum will also cover “green” building materials and sustainable design principles.
Students will create their own residential design(s) incorporating these principles throughout the semester.

CNST 128.
ADOBE CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A practicum in the use of adobe as a building material for both historic restoration and new structures. Includes use of production-scale adobe brick forms, building to code with formulating and applying adobe plaster.

CNST 175.
BLUEPRINT READING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to blueprint reading for builders to help students interpret the ideas of designers and architects and to express their own ideas through drawings. Stresses necessary skills and process used in architectural drafting.

CNST 184.
GENERAL CARPENTRY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course will have two components: a classroom segment, where carpentry concepts will be explored, and a hands-on segment where students will be able to participate in the actual construction of a structure. Habitat for Humanity has generously offered one of their projects as a “hands-on” site.

CNST 185.
COST ESTIMATING FOR CARPENTRY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

The application of mathematics to carpentry trade problems such as planning and computing labor, material, and equipment for residential, commercial, and other projects.

CNST 293.
TOPICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Topics in construction technology. Topics will vary.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRJS 101.
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This introductory course will examine the history and philosophy of the Criminal Justice system. It will also discuss each of the components in the system.

CRJS 102.
INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A study of the history, philosophy, legal issues, research, and models of the corrections system and the impact of the system on prisoners and society. The corrections process, the rights of the convicted criminal and correctional systems and community corrections and other alternative sentencing programs.

CRJS 103.
JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A study of the juvenile justice system, with particular emphasis on New Mexico; history of the juvenile court; juvenile court practices and procedures; neglect; dependency and delinquency; jurisdiction of the court; and the roles of the police officer, the juvenile correctional officer, social service worker and other human service workers in the juvenile justice system. This course will also explore alternative juvenile justice programs that have proven successful around the country.

CRJS 142.
Principles Of Evidence AND Criminal Procedure. (3)
Pre/co-requisite: CRJS 101

Designed to give the student an understanding of the fundamental concepts of evidence and to explore the relationship between the concepts and the criminal justice system.

CRJS 201.
CRIMINAL LAW I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introductory study of the philosophy, development, and social basis of U.S. and New Mexico criminal law and constitutional procedure. Topics include an overview of the classification of crime, the elements of and parties to a crime, defenses, pertinent principles of evidence, laws of arrest and search and seizure and their application in the legal process.

CRJS 203.
COURTS AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Structures and functions of American courts. Roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel, operation of petit and grand juries, trial and appellate courts.+

CRJS 204.
POLICING AND LAW ENFORCEMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course will explore issues relevant to the law enforcement community. The course will explore the evolution of American policing from its roots in England to the present. Topics will include community oriented policing, problem oriented policing, victim issues, the culture of the police community, trauma and stress, the structure of local, state, and federal agencies, and the process that link law enforcement agencies to the courts and corrections

CULINARY ARTS

CART 101.
INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY ARTS. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

An introduction to the fundamentals of professional food preparation to include product identification, basic skill development, dexterity, safety, and sanitation in the kitchen. This class will focus on the use of seasonal fruits, vegetables, and grains and will provide the student with the basics of quality control, weights and measures, terms, professionalism, and communication.

CART 102.
SOUPS, STOCKS, AND SAUCES. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Emphasis will be placed on classical techniques in the preparation of mother sauces and their derivatives, proper stock preparation, reduction, storage, and usage. This course also covers the assembly of clear broth, legume, velouté, chowders, bisques and cream soups, and focuses on the preparation of vegetarian, meat, poultry, and seafood entreés.

CART 103.
INTERNATIONAL CUISINE (3).
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course affords the opportunity for the student to practice skills acquired in 101 and 102 using the medium of international cuisine. This course will explore the cuisines of France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Mexico, and more. Learn to work with the ingredients that are adding excitement to the global market basket. Study a variety of approaches to preparing and presenting the final dish.

CART 104.
PROCESSING AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (3).
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course will cover the basic steps to develop, package, and market a specialty food product. Topics include specialty foods history, market research, trends, processing techniques, food safety issues, packaging design, and labeling requirements. The course also includes hands-on food processing workshops including commercial canning and juicing at the Taos Food Center.

CART 107.
CULINARY BUSINESS (3).
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

The student will be allowed a solid financial business approach to food services and culinary arts through use of computer technology to manage costing, budgets, menu development and writing, ordering, profitability, record keeping, inventory, sanitation schedules and supplies, file management, and P & L’s. This course is a template for existing restaurateurs as well as those wanting to start a food service business.

CART 109.
TABLE SERVICE INTERNSHIP (3).
Prerequisites: CART 101, 102, 103, 107 OR MGMT 101, AND 12 HOURS OF ELECTIVES.
Lab fee

This is the second to the last course necessary for completion of the Culinary Arts Certificate Program. This class provides clear, straightforward techniques needed to assure excellent table service. The course also allows the opportunity for the student to have an overview of an entire restaurant operation.

CART 110.
CULINARY ARTS INTERNSHIP (3).
Prerequisite: CART 109.
Lab fee

This is the final course necessary for completion of the Culinary Arts Certificate Program. This course allows the student to work 45 hours in a professional restaurant environment. This is a hands on, work-study class. It will provide the student the opportunity to practice real world techniques in the culinary arts profession.

CART 120.
Nuevo Latino Cuisine. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the different styles and ingredients of Latin Cuisine. Emphasis will be focused on Traditions and Techniques and expand to the new style of Latin cooking.

CART 121.
Seafood in Taos . (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course will focus on handling and preparation of seafood and fish. We will learn varied recipes, sauces, and cooking methods, study and apply industry standards for healthy handling and sanitation.

CART 122.
Continental Cooking with New Mexican Accent . (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to classic continental skills of soup, sauce, and meat preparation. Using classic culinary techniques, we will accentuate local ingredients and New Mexican flavored dishes.

CART 123.
Cooking for Health , Diet , and Wellness . (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course will focus on healthy cooking methods and menu selection. Delicious, fresh and healthy eating, with recipes that can be adapted to individual requirements.

CART 127.
Cooking for Health , Diet and Wellness II. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This is a hands-on Cooking Class that will allow students to understand how to Cook for a Healthy Lifestyle.

CART 150.
Basics of Pastry . (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the fundamentals of Pastry making. This course will focus on skill development to be able to produce a variety of classic pastries.

CART 151.
Advanced Basics of Pastry Arts . (3)
Prerequisite: None

Continuation of the fundamentals of Pastry making. This course will focus on skill development to be able to produce a variety of classic pastries.

CART 154.
Best of Bread . (3)
Prerequisite: None

We will start with simple recipes that are the basic staff of life for many countries and work our way up to using a wide variety of grains, flours, yeast, and liquids.

CART 155.
Best of Bread II. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Bread, rolls, and doughs for home production and entertaining.

CART 156.
Fancy Cake Decoration . (3)
Prerequisite: None

Provides students with the ability to prepare and use various icings, fillings and glazes. Learn different garnishing techniques with a Pastry Bag such as flowers, borders and lattice work.

CART 157.
Fancy Cake Decoration II. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Provide students with the ability to prepare and use various icings, fillings and glazes. Learn different garnishing techniques with a Pastry Bag. Expand your skills and creativity with a thorough understanding of this lucrative business.

CART 293.
Topics : Culinary Arts . (1-3)
Prerequisite: None

Topics may vary.

DANCE

DANC 105.
DANCE APPRECIATION. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee

A lecture and discussion course introducing the study of dance as technique, spectacle and ritual for today’s audience. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

DANC 110.
MODERN DANCE I. (3 to a maximum of 9)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee

Fundamental work for the adult beginner in Modern Dance techniques and styles.

DANC 169.
FLAMENCO I. (3 to a maximum of 9)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee

Fundamental work for the adult beginner in techniques and styles of Flamenco.

DANC 250.
MOVEMENT ANALYSIS II. (2)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee

An introduction to Laban’s theoretical system for observing and describing movement events and their component parts. Guidance in the application of Laban theory to dance, therapy and awareness of the role of movement in the other arts through an understanding of dynamics, space and body function.

DANC 289.
TOPIC: FLAMENCO. (1-3 to a maximum of 12)
Prerequisite: None

Various topics such as: Cante, Cuadro/Improvisation/ Structure, Spanish Form/Castanets, Palmas and Cajon, Brazeo/Marcaje, Footwork and Vueltas and Bata de Cola/Manton/Abanico.

EARLY CHILDHOOD MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

ECME 101
CHILD GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT, AND LEARNING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, provides foundational knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn.

ECME 103.
HEALTH, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION. (2)
Prerequisite: None

This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well being, sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments.

ECME 111.
FAMILY AND COMMUNITY COLLABORATION I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This basic course examines the involvement of families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with parents and others involved with children in early childhood settings are discussed.

ECME 115.
GUIDING YOUNG CHILDREN. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course explores theories of child guidance and practical applications. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children, effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions.

ECME 117.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: 117L

This beginning curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate content in early childhood programs and developmentally appropriate curriculum integration into teaching and learning experiences.

ECME 117L.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION PRACTICUM I. (2)
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: 117

This course provides opportunities for students to apply knowledge gained from ECME 117 and develop skills in planning developmentally appropriate learning experiences for young children including children with special needs.

ECME 193.
FOUNDATIONS/EARLY CARE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course is designed for developing professionals in the field of early care, education, and family support, those “new to the field” as well as those already employed, but with no formal training. Course work will provide an initial introduction to the seven competency areas of early childhood education.

Students will have an opportunity to observe and participate for ten hours in a local early care and educational setting. Upon successful completion of this course students will be awarded an Entry Level New Mexico Certificate.

ECME 202.
INTRODUCTION TO READING AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT. (3) Prerequisite: None

This is a basic course in children’s emergent literacy and reading development: Ways to foster phonemic awareness, literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and language development are explored.

ECME 217.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION II. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This basic course focuses on the learning environment and the implementation of curriculum in early childhood programs. Various curriculum models and teaching and learning strategies are explored.

ECME 217L.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION PRACTICUM II. (2)
Prerequisite: None

This course provides opportunities to apply knowledge gained in ECME 217 and develop skills in planning learning environments and implementing curriculum for young children including those with special needs.

ECME 220.
ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN AND EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS I. (3) Prerequisite: None

This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, and the development and use of formative and summative program evaluation to ensure quality.

ECME 230.
PROFESSIONALISM. (2)
Prerequisite: None

This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced.

EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES

EPS 101.
HOW THE EARTH WORKS-AN INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGY.
(3) Prerequisite: None

A fascinating tour of our active planet. Explore earth materials (rocks and minerals), the continents’ motions and related origins of earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, oceans, landscapes, natural energy and economic resources, global warming and other topics. Students are encouraged but not required to enroll concurrently in 105L. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

EPS 105L.
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. (1)
Pre or corequisite: 101

Minerals, rocks and topographic and geologic maps; field trips. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

EPS 110.
TOPICS IN THE EARTH SCIENCES. (1 TO A MAXIMUM OF 3)
Prerequisite: None

Eight- to 16-week courses on selected topics relating directly to the human experience, e.g., Volcanoes, Extinctions, Weather, Earthquakes, New Mexico’s Water, Soils, Nuclear Hazards, Geomagnetism, Albuquerque Field Geology and the Geology of Everyday Life.

EPS 115.
GEOLOGICAL DISASTERS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Causes and effects of disastrous geological events, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides and floods.

EPS 201L.
EARTH HISTORY. (3)
Prerequisite: 101 or ENVS 101
Pre- or corequisite: 105L or ENVS 102L

Origin and history of the Earth including age of the planet and dating of rocks, changing configurations of oceans and continents as a result of plate tectonics, records of climate change, history of formation and erosion of mountain chains, origin and evolution of life and causes of extinction. Required field trip and lab exercises permit understanding of how Earth history is interpreted from the geologic rock record. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

EPS 203.
ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: 101 or ENVS 101 recommended.

Geologic context for the occurrence of metals, industrial minerals, water, and energy resources on Earth. Environmental ramifications of resource exploration, exploitation and use and local, national and global environmental laws and treaties governing those activities.

EPS 225.
OCEANOGRAPHY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Understanding physical, chemical, and biological processes in the world oceans.

EPS 250.
GEOLOGY OF NEW MEXICO. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of geologic features of New Mexico including structures, land forms, stratigraphy, fossils, geologic history and mineral resources. A course in elementary geology recommended.

EPS 251.
METEOROLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Description of weather phenomena, principles of atmospheric motion, weather map analysis and weather prediction.

ECONOMICS

ECON 105.
INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Economics on a national scale: determination of national income, employment level, inflation and impact of policies affecting money supply, interest rates and government programs. Current macroeconomic issues and problems. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 2113). (Prerequisite for most upper-division courses).

ECON 106.
INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS. (3)

Exploration of individual consumer behavior, production decisions by the firm and supply and demand relationships in the marketplace. Examination of the international dimension of production and consumption choices. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences (NMCCN 2123). (Prerequisite for most upper-division courses.)

EDUCATION

EDUC 293.
TOPICS IN EDUCATION. (1-3, no limit)
Prerequisite: None

Various topics related to education from an interdisciplinary perspective.

EMERGENCY MEDICINE

EMS 113.
EMT-BASIC. (8)
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: 142
Lab fee.

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lecture instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing.

EMS 142
EMT-BASIC LAB. (2)
Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: 113

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing.

EMS 143
EMT-INTERMEDIATE LAB. (1)
Prerequisite: 113 and 142
Corequisite: 180

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT- Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology.

EMS 180.
EMT-INTERMEDIATE (5)
Prerequisite: 113 and 142
Corequisite: 143

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT- Intermediate lecture content, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology.

ENGLISH

ISR 100.
READING AND CRITICAL THINKING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Focuses on reading skills required for success in college. Includes comprehension, problem- solving, note-taking, summarizing, test-taking and computer-assisted research skills.Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

ISE 001.
ENGLISH WRITING LAB. (1)
Prerequisite: None

Individualized writing lab. Writing bridges to 101. English mechanics skills.

ISE 098/099.
BASIC WRITING AND READING SKILLS. (3,3)
Prerequisite: None

Prepares the student for first year English composition and college core classes by focusing on basic practical writing and reading skills needed in school, business and everyday life. This course provides the student with an opportunity to improve in the writing of sentences, summaries and paragraphs, as well as to expand their knowledge of English grammar and punctuation.

ISE 100.
ESSAY WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Prepares students for first-year college composition by providing practice of the rhetorical and grammatical skills necessary to write purposeful, reader-centered essays. Covers effective use of a writing process in out-of-class essays and in timed, in-class situations. Incorporates readings for discussion of ideas and for information to be used in students’ writing. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Satisfactory completion of ISE 100 meets prerequisite for ENGL 101.

ENGL 101.
COMPOSITION I: EXPOSITION. (3)
Prerequisite: completion of ISE 100 or verbal ACT of 19 or verbal SAT of 450 or a Compass English >74

Expository writing and reading. Concentrates on organizing and supporting ideas in writing. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

ENGL 102.
COMPOSITION II: ANALYSIS AND ARGUMENT. (3)
Prerequisite: C or better in 101 or verbal ACT of 26-28 or verbal/reading SAT of 610

Practice writing analytic and argumentative essays based on expository and literary readings. Some research required. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

ENGL 107.
Greek Mythology. (3)
Prerequisite: None

(Also offered as Classical Studies 107) Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English.

ENGL 150.
THE STUDY OF LITERATURE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the study and appreciation of literature for non-English majors. Shows how understanding writers’ techniques increases the enjoyment of their works; relates these techniques to literary conventions; teaches recognition, analysis, discussion of important themes.

ENGL 211.
TOPICS IN LITERATURE. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: ENGL 150

Surveys a specific type or area of literature, e.g., the American novel, the satiric novel, southern fiction, the western novel, American poetry, feminist literature, Chicano literature, Native American literature, African-American literature, Medieval and Viking literature. Primarily for non-majors.

ENGL 219.
TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite 101 with a B or better, or 102 with C or better, or ACT=>26 or SAT=>610, or successful Writing Proficiency Portfolio.

Practice in writing and editing of workplace documents, including correspondence, reports and proposals.

ENGL 220.
EXPOSITORY WRITING. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: 101 with a B or better, or English 102 with C or better, or ACT=>26 or SAT=>610, or successful Writing Proficiency Portfolio.

An intermediate course with emphasis on rhetorical types, structure and style. (EPW)

ENGL 224.
INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

A beginning course in the writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Emphasis on process over product. Introduces issues of craft, workshop vocabulary, strategies for revision, and the habit of reading as a writer.

ENGL 240.
TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A study of the basic analysis of English sentences offered by traditional grammar. Presents terminology and methods for identifying parts of speech, functional units of sentences and basic sentence patterns.

ENGL 250.
THE ANALYSIS OF LITERATURE. (3)
Prerequisite: 102 or its equivalent.

First course required of all English majors. Concentrates on methods of literary analysis and critical writing.

ENGL 264.
SURVEY OF NATIVE LITERATURES AND RHETORICS. (3) Prerequisite: None

A general overview of the history and diversity of the literatures and rhetoric of Native peoples, including oral tradition, film, autobiography, fiction, poetry, art, drama and ceremony. Focus is on American Indian texts.

ENGL 265.
INTRODUCTION TO CHICANA/O LITERATURES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A survey of Chicana/o novels, short stories, essays, poetry, and drama from nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on major themes such as history, culture, identity, language, and region.

ENGL 292.
WORLD LITERATURES: ANCIENT WORLD THROUGH THE 16TH CENTURY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of key texts in world literature from the ancient world through the 16th century.

ENGL 293.
WORLD LITERATURES: 17TH CENTURY THROUGH THE PRESENT. (3) Prerequisite: None

Survey of key texts in world literatures from the 17th century through the present.

ENGL 298.
WORKSHOP IN LITERATURE OR WRITING. (3 to a maximum of 6) Prerequisite: None

Various topics in literature, language, and writing.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ENVS 101.
THE BLUE PLANET. (3)
Prerequisite: None

To understand global change and environmental concerns, this course weaves together an understanding of Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere and oceans and how ecosystems are linked to the physical environment. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 102L.

ENVS 102L.
THE BLUE PLANET LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: 101

Introductory environmental earth science laboratory. Includes minerals, rocks, and rock cycle, topographic maps, local geology and groundwater, weather and climate.

FAMILY STUDIES

FS 213.
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Overview of significant research and theories in premarital, marital and family relationships.

FS 281.
INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the profession of Family Studies including content areas, community agencies and career opportunities.

FRENCH

FREN 101.
ELEMENTARY FRENCH I. ELEMENTARY FRENCH II. (3,3) Prerequisite: None

Conducted in French.

GENERAL STUDIES

GNST 293.
TOPICS IN GENERAL STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Topics will vary.

GNST 293.
KICKBOX COMBAT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This high-energy cardio class is empowered by the martial arts as well as boot camp style training. In this class you will tone, define and strengthen your muscles using a variety of punches, blocks, strikes and kicks along with strength training exercises.

GNST 293.
SPINNING STRONG. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Get into peak cardiovascular shape and get strong, toned abdominal muscles all in one fun class. This circuit style class will consist of high intensity spin, weight training and core exercises. Super fun and challenging!

GNST 293.
HARDCORE BOOT CAMP. (3)
Prerequisite: None

If you love a challenge and don’t mind sweating, then you’re ready for this extreme total body - conditioning program. This class will include tons of cardio, strength training, plyometrics, athletic drills and core work to push your body to its next level of training.

GNST 293.
ZUMBA FUSION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This fun, energetic class will incorporate basic hip-hop, merengue, salsa, cumbia and reggaeton in a dance-fitness format that will have you sweating and burning mega calories! Class will also include body-sculpting exercises to help tone and define muscles as well as abdominal work. No dance experience necessary.

GNST 293.
AQUA BOOT CAMP. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Have fun and get fit in this energizing water work out! This innovative, high-powered workout will enhance cardio endurance, core stability, strength, tone and balance using the joyful element of water. This is a great class for all fitness levels. No swimming experience is necessary.

GNST 293.
NEW BODY 2013. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This challenging and super fun class will include cardio and strength-training intervals designed for maximum calorie burn. A variety of equipment including dumbbells, barbells, stability balls and resistance bands will be incorporated.

GNST 293.
WEIGHT LIFTING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This class will review correct form for weight lifting as well as routines specifically designed to increase muscle growth. OPT (optimum performance training) model will be used. This class will take place in the weight room. No past weight lifting experience necessary.

GNST 293.
PILATES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Students in this course will learn to move from their core using the Pilates technique. Students will become familiar with the 34 Pilates Mat exercises and will gain experience with specialized Pilates equipment. This class incorporates some study of the Joseph Pilates Philosophy.

GNST 293.
ARGENTINE TANGO. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory level course that involves the physical study and practice of the dance. Class time will be used on the dance floor learning the moves of the Argentine Tango and studying techniques of the dance. Students will learn how to navigate a social dance floor and the musicality required to dance the Argentine Tango.

GNST 293.
ZUMBA FITNESS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Are you ready to party yourself into shape? That’s exactly what ZUMBA TM is all about. It’s an exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning dance fitness- party that’s moving millions of people toward joy and health. Come join the fun!

GNST 293.
AQUA ZUMBA. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Known as the Zumba “Pool Party”, this class integrates the Zumba formula and philosophy with traditional aqua disciplines. Aqua Zumba is a safe, challenging and exhilarating water-based workout that’s both cardio-conditioning and body toning.

GNST 293.
TOTAL STRETCH. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Here’s a super tune up for your whole body that will energize and invigorate you. Total body stretch is a great mix of toning and stretching to increase flexibility and strengthen the body.

GNST 293.
STABILITY BALL WORKOUT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An energetic ball routine that incorporates cardio in a body sculpting class.

GNST 293.
WEIGHT ROOM CIRCUIT CLASS (3)
Prerequisite: None

A well-sequenced cardio/weights interval program that features athletic cardio & weight room equipment. Each circuit is done twice using 8 – 12 stations. Accommodates all fitness levels by offering progressive options for each exercise.

GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 101.
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

World geography; physical elements. Use of maps and globes for a systematic analysis of world climates, vegetation, soils and landforms and their distribution, interrelation and significance to humans.

GEOG 105L.
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY LABORATORY (1)
Prerequisite: None

Exercises designed to complement 101. Applied problems in the spatial processes of the physical environment. Map construction and reading, weather and climatic analysis, classification of vegetative and soil associations, landform distribution analysis. Two hours lab.

HEALTH EDUCATION

HED 164L.
STANDARD FIRST AID. (1-3, maximum of 3)
Prerequisite: None

Preparation in practice to meet needs and situations when basic first aid care is needed. Students eligible for standard first aid certification & CPR Certificate.

HEALTH CAREERS DENTAL ASSISTANT

HCDA 101.
INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL ASSISTING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce the student to four- handed dentistry to include: asepsis and OSHA recommendations related to general operative procedures, medical history, vital signs, and charting.

HCDA 120.
PRE-CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING I (4)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to four-handed dentistry including aseptic techniques, moisture control, local anesthesia, instrumentation, dental materials, and general operative.

HCDA 125.
PRE-CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING II. (4)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A continuation of pre-clinical I with emphasis on four-handed techniques in six recognized specialties.

HCDA 145.
CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting.

HCDA 155.
CLINICAL DENTAL ASSISTING 11. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Clinical application of basic dental and behavioral science to the practice of dental assisting with an emphasis on refinement of chair side skills.

HCDA 230.
DENTAL RADIOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Instruction in the basic principles of radiation physics, and modern intra- and extra- oral dental radiographic techniques. It includes exposing radiographs, arrangement and care of darkroom equipment, composition and preparation of developing solutions, processing and mounting films. Radiation safety and protection guidelines will be emphasized.

HCDA 240.
DENTAL EDUCATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Various aspects of dental disease prevention will be covered. This will include coronal polishing of teeth, providing one-on-one oral hygiene instruction, the importance of nutrition, and the psychology of patient behavior.

HCDA 164.
SEMINAR IN DENTAL ASSISTING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This unit is designed to instruct the student in the basic fundamentals of legal aspects in dentistry. It includes both didactic and clinical application.

HEALTH CAREERS HEALTH SCIENCES

HCHS 111.
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY. (3).
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to terminology used in health careers. It will provide a basic knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and root words used in describing anatomical parts of the human body as well as general terms relating to disease processes.

HCHS 114.
CONCEPTS OF DISEASE TRANSMISSION. (4)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

This course will introduce the student to the fundamental concepts and biological principles of disease causing organisms. The function of disease producers and the ways in which humans can control such organisms will be discussed.

HCHS 125.
INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course presents the basic therapeutic actions of various types of commonly used drugs. Emphasis is placed on the classification of medications, therapeutic actions, adverse reactions, routes of administration and calculation of drug dosages and solutions.

HISTORY

HIST 101.
WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO 1648 (3).
Prerequisite: None

Ancient times to 1648. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 102.
WESTERN CIVILIZATION POST 1648 (3).
Prerequisite: None

1648 to present. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 161.
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1877 (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of the economic, political, intellectual and social development of the United States, including the place of the U.S. in world affairs from 1607 to 1877. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 162.
HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877 (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of the economic, political, intellectual and social development of the United States, including the place of the U.S. in world affairs from 1877 to the present. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

HIST 181.
HISTORY OF EARLY LATIN AMERICA. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to indigenous, African and Iberian backgrounds. Examines colonial societies through social, economic and political institutions with attention to the contributions of Indians, Africans and Europeans to the creation of Latin America’s diverse societies.

HIST 182 .
MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Surveys the nations of Latin America from their independence until the present. Emphasizes the process of nation-building, governance, socioeconomic integration and coping with modernization. Special attention given to great leaders of Latin America.

HIST 220.
STUDIES IN HISTORY. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: None

Will vary from instructor to instructor but will offer a review of particular historical issues designed for the nonspecialist. For content of particular courses, see Schedule of Classes and contact Department.

HIST 260.
HISTORY OF NEW MEXICO. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to New Mexico history from earliest human settlement to the present day.

HOLISTIC HEALTH AND HEALING ARTS

HHHA 101.
INTRO TO HEALING ARTS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to various theories and modalities of practice in the Healing Arts. An overview and demonstration of Eastern and Western philosophies, technologies and modalities. This course is both didactic and experiential in nature.

HHHA 102.
MEDITATION, CONSCIOUSNESS AND SELF-HEALING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

History and application of practical techniques for awakening the subtle
body. Creative meditation and personal mythology will be explored as a basis for mobilizing the mind/body spirit to use inner resources for self-healing.

HHHA 103.
KUNDALINI YOGA. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Fundamentals of Kundalini Yoga, including exercise sets (Kriyas), breathing techniques (pranayama), and mental concentration and relaxation techniques; i.e. meditation. The focus is on strengthening the nervous system and balancing the endocrine glandular system.

HHHA 104.
HATHA YOGA. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Hatha Yoga is a study of yogic postures as a form of health maintenance. Students will study asanas (postures) and pranayama (breath work) including yogic philosophy. Students will study the use and purposes of asanas.

HHHA 105.
TAI CHI. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Taijiquan as applied for daily living will be taught. Students will learn this system for health, self-defense, to manage stress, and to access areas deep within the body and consciousness normally not accessed.

HHHA 106.
INTRODUCTION TO MASSAGE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to the field of massage and self care. Learn basic massage, Swedish massage, Deep Tissue, and Reflexology. This course is open to all students interested in the field of massage.

HHHA 114.
KUNDALINI YOGA AND COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A continuation and deeper exploration of Kundalini Yoga including Kriyas, pranayama and meditations. We will read the words written by and about those who have attained the goal of yoga, as defined by Patanjali. We will note the impact our yogic practices have on our communication with friends, family, and society.

HHHA 115.
AYURVEDA: THE SCIENCE AND ART OF LIFE AND LONGEVITY. (1-3)
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the 5,000 - year-old science of ayurveda which originated in India. An overview of this ancient art and science of self-healing will be presented with the focus on how to apply this knowledge base to current lifestyles in the west.

HHHA 116.
INTRODUCTION TO ORIENTAL MEDICINE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the theory, practice and historical development of Oriental Medicine. An overview of the major theoretical concepts governing this medicine and its historical context, in both ancient and modern times, will be presented.

HHHA 117.
DREAMS, VISION, AND ARTMAKING/IMAGERY AS A HEALING TOOL. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An experiential course on consciousness, exploring the relationship between meditation, visualization dreams and creativity. Techniques for and the use of meditation and imagery (visualization) for personal growth, creativity, healing, and art making will be taught.

HHHA 127.
AIKIDO. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Aikido essentially means “the way of harmony with the force and principle of nature”. The focus of training is simple and practical through the repetitive practice of various motions known as kata (forms). Aikido practice invariably brings greater self-awareness.

HHHA 129.
QI GONG: FOUNTAIN OF LIFE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on introducing the ancient Chinese practice of using QI (breath, or life force) to awaken our intrinsic self-healing energy for internal cultivation and holistic healing.

HHHA 130.
EMOTIONAL HEALING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course is a vehicle for students to learn to become consciously aware of how inner feeling and the psychological conditioning attached to them influences the state of health. A holistic health approach is utilized to support the development of physical awareness and emotional self-healing.

HHHA 131.
ARTS AND HEALING I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

We will explore the function of the creative imagination within a holistic model of health, through art-making, “image-tracking”, sand tray, and sound, as well as reading and discussion.The work of CG Jung on dreams and Active Imagination will be included.

HHHA 141
YOGA ETHICS (1)
Prerequisite: None

A required course for the yoga teacher training in foundational concepts in ethics, methodology, and philosophy in teaching yoga.

HHHA 142
YOGA THERAPY I (1)
Prerequisite: None

Yoga therapy is the adaptation and application of ancient Yoga techniques and practices to help individuals facing health challenges manage their condition, restore balance, and improve their state of mind. This is a required course in the yoga teacher training.

HHHA 143
SVASTHA YOGA (3)
Prerequisite: None

The word Svastha in Sanskrit refers to the state of complete health and balance. SvasthaYoga then is a practical and accessible approach to yoga that allows any individual regardless of body shape, age, level of fitness, or experience to relieve the mind of daily stress, build the body’s strength, flexibility, and stamina, and achieve a sense of reintegration.

HHHA 144
YOGA THERAPY II (1)
Prerequisite: None

The second course continues the application of techniques in yoga to help individuals facing health challenges, manage their condition, restore balance and state of mind.

HHHA 200
ENERGY MEDICINE AND MASSAGE (3)
Prerequisite: None

An exploration of the integration of energy modalities in the therapeutic realm. A survey of different energetic modalities will be explored as well as hands on techniques.

HHHA 201
SACRED CEREMONY: POEMS, PRAYERS, RITUALS AND PRACTICES FROM AROUND THE WORLD. (3)
Prerequisite: None

“Come, come, whoever you are!” as the mystic poet Rumi exclaimed. We will read sacred poetry, prayers, and songs from religious and spiritual traditions throughout the world’s various times and cultures. We will also share and learn about rituals and practices from the world’s major traditions.

HHHA 202.
MEDITATION AND THE CREATIVE ARTS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An exploration of the ways in which meditation practice can inform and inspire creativity and the practice of the arts. We’ll experiment with various meditation and mindfulness techniques, with art forms including drawing, calligraphy, writing, photography, and music to access our deepest sources of creative expression.

HHHA 203.
KUNDALINI YOGA II. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Kundalini Yoga II is for students who choose to deepen their practice gaining more benefits by incorporating yoga in their lifestyle as a support for their studies and their activities.

HHHA 229.
LIFE GIVING SWORD (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to provide an introduction and orientation to the basics of Aikido weapons practice through sword and staff work. With an emphasis on the healing and the way of the warrior.

HHHA 293.
TOPICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Selected issues and topics in Holistic Health and Healing Arts. Not more than nine total credits of topics may be applied to graduation.

HUMAN SERVICES

HS 101.
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES. (3)
Pre- or Co requisite: ENGL 100.

An overview of the care givers, the delivery systems, and the types of services provided within the field of Human Services, with particular emphasis on the development of the field and the roles and functions performed by these “new professionals.”

HS 102.
PRINCIPLES OF INTERVIEWING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Provides basic knowledge of the interviewing process with emphasis on developing interviewing skills. Develops an awareness of ways in which the student’s background, attitude, and behavior influence the interview.

HS 105.
GROUP DYNAMICS. (4)
Prerequisite: HS 101 or HS Coordinator permission.

Drawing on both theoretical and observer- participation models, students will explore various relationships as they develop in dyads, small-group and large-group settings. Relates practical experience from field placement to group models of interaction.

HS 109.
TECHNIQUES OF ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION. (3)
Prerequisite: HS 101 and 102.

The course surveys means of obtaining and evaluating information about difficulties which bring people to mental health or social service settings and introduces students to various techniques and processes for assisting individuals, groups, and families.

HS 250.
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES. (4)
Prerequisite: HS 101, 102, 109 & Psych 105 or HS Coordinator permission.

Practical experience in a clinical setting involving service to clients and patients in various human service agencies; understanding the helping process.

HS 251.
ADVANCED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES.
(4)
Prerequisite: HS 101, 102 ,109 , 250 & Psych 105 or HS Coordinator permission.

Continuation of HS 250 with increased student responsibility for client/care service. Weekly seminar.

HS 252.
ADVANCED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES. (4)
Prerequisite: HS 101, 102, 109, 250, 251 & Psych 105 or HS Coordinator permission.

Continuation of 251 with increased student responsibility for client/care service. Weekly seminar.

HS 293.
TOPICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Selected issues and topics in Human Services.

LATIN

LATN 101
ELEMENTARY LATIN I (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the Latin language; grammar, syntax and readings in Roman authors.

LATN 102
ELEMENTARY LATIN II (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Continuation of 101. Introduction to the Latin language; grammar, syntax and readings in Roman authors.

LINGUISTICS

LING 101.
INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE. (3)
(Also offered as ANTH 110.)
Prerequisite: None

Broad overview of the nature of language: language structure, biology of language, language learning, language and thought, bilingualism, social and regional variation and educational implications. Intended to fulfill breadth requirements in any college.

MANAGEMENT

MGMT 101.
FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING I. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 121

This course covers the accounting cycle and financial statements with emphasis on sole proprietorship.

MGMT 102.
FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING II. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Continuation of 101, including corporation and manufacturing accounting and decision making.

MGMT 113.
MANAGEMENT: AN INTRODUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Modern concepts of organizations and their management in a dynamic world. An overview of managerial activities within business and other organizations.

MGMT 195.
INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP. (3)
Prerequisites: ISR 100 or Compass >=71. ISE100 and MATH 118.

A survey course that examines topics including: the entrepreneurial process and economy, the entrepreneur's profile and characteristics, youth and social entrepreneurship.

MGMT 222.
INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A complete overview of the system for assessing customer needs, allocation of scarce resources to fulfill those needs, transmittal of market related information, completion of exchange processes and profit maximization in free markets. Emphasis on interdisciplinary tools for management, decision-making and developing marketing strategies in domestic and international market applications.(Credit not applicable toward B.B.A. degree.)

MASSAGE THERAPY

MAS 250.
MASSAGE THERAPY I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

For students enrolled in Massage Therapy Program. This course focuses on expanding the palpation skills of novice student therapists focusing on deep tissue techniques, kinesiology, muscle anatomy and physiology.

MAS 253.
DEEP TISSUE TECHNIQUES I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

For students enrolled in the Massage Therapy Program . This course builds on previous courses and deepens the palpatory skills as well as the understanding of pathology, muscle anatomy and physiology. This course offers an introduction to myofascial release and is open to professionals seeking continuing education.

MAS 254.
MYOFASCIAL AND MYOSKELETAL TECHNIQUES IN MASSAGE THERAPY.
(3)

For students in the the Massage Therapy Program or professionals seeking continuing education. The focus of this course is myofascial and myoskeletal soft tissue techniques in Massage. Students will further their understanding of Myofascial Anatomy Trains and learn incorporation of myoskeletal techniques.

MAS 255.
CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MASSAGE THERAPY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

For students enrolled in the Massage Therapy Program. This course will provide the opportunity for students to practice their basic Swedish and Deep Tissue Massage fundamentals in a professional massage setting with the public and is required to graduate.

MAS 256.
HEALING TOUCH AND AWARENESS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

The foundation to any massage practice in awareness. This class will introduce the student to techniques that increase self-awareness of your body, feelings, and thoughts, while remaining present while touching another person.

MAS 257.
INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL BALINESE MASSAGE. (1)
Prerequisite: None

Students learn the healing art of Traditional Balinese Massage Anthropological studies, religious influences, cultural diversity and hands- on techniques used in Bali. This course is open to all students and professional CEUs.

MAS 258.
INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL THAI MASSAGE. (1)
Prerequisite: None

Traditional Thai Massage is an experience of rhythmical movement where the practitioner leads the receiver through a flow of passive yoga stretches, deep muscle pressure and joint mobilization. An introductory, full-body sequence of Thai Massage will be taught. Class will emphasize meditative awareness, breathing, use of body weight and posture. This course is open to all students and professional CEUs.

MAS 259.
EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This class focuses on the various exercise testing evaluations, dietary approach for peak performance, the physiology of exercise, and exercise for special populations i.e. diabetes. This course is required for the Massage Therapy Program and continuing education for professionals.

MAS 260.
CULTURAL DIVERSITY COMPETENCY AND CROSS CULTURAL ETHICAL ISSUES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course addresses the ethical and cultural component of massage therapy as it relates to allopathic and naturopathic settings and is a required course in the Massage Therapy Program.

MAS 265.
CRANIAL SACRAL I. (1)
Prerequisite: None

An introduction to concepts in cranial sacral therapy. Cranial Sacral I will introduce students to the bio-mechanical, somatio-emotional, an energetic aspects of Cranial-Sacral Therapy. This course is open to all students and professional CEUs.

MAS 261.
CRANIAL SACRAL II. (1)
Prerequisite: None

Cranial Sacral II will continue in the education of Cranial I and offer a more in-depth experience of bio-mechanical, somatio-emotional, an energetic aspects of Cranial-Sacral Therapy. Students will have an opportunity to acquire and practice specific, safe, and effective cranial techniques that are enhancement to a new or existing massage practice. This course is open to all students and professional CEUs.

MAS 262
Yoga & Anatomy Trains (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to myofascial yoga and the applied concepts of myofascial meridians. This course counts toward professional CEUs and the yoga teacher training program.

MAS 263
Yoga & Psychology of Chakras (3)
Prerequisite: None

This courses introduces the students to concepts and application of chakra and Jungian psychology with the application to asana. This course counts toward professional CEUs and the yoga teacher training program.

MAS 264
Yoga & the Myofascial Body (1)
Prerequisite: None

A weekend workshop introducing the basics for understanding myofascial yoga and its application to myofascial meridians. This course counts toward professional CEUs and the yoga teacher training program.

MAS 293.
Topics in Massage Therapy. (1-3)
Prerequisite: None

Restriction: admitted to UNM-Taos Integrative Massage Therapy Program.
This course is for various topics in massage therapy. It offers a wide variety of continuing education and topics in massage therapy from 1- 3 credit hours. Courses will vary depending on the need of the student body and developments in massage therapy.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 100.
ALGEBRAIC PROBLEM SOLVING. (3)
Lab fee.

Includes signed numbers, solving linear equations, formulas, graphing, solving systems of equations, and applications. Also covers exponents and polynomials, factoring, and quadratics. Satisfactory completion of ISM 100 meets prerequisite for MATH 120. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

MATH 111.
MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS I. (3)
Prerequisite: 120 or 121 or 123 or 150 or 162 or 180 or STAT 145 or ISM 100 or ACT=>19 or SAT=>450 or Compass Pre-Algebra >56 or Algebra >33

Course offers an in-depth look at the representations of rational numbers, including base-ten and decimal numbers, integers, fractions, and arithmetic operations on these sets. Problem solving is emphasized throughout.

MATH 112.
MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS II. (3)
Prerequisite: 111

This course develops basic geometric concepts including rigid transformations and congruence; dilations and similarity; length, area and volume; systems of measurement and unit conversions; connections to coordinate geometry. Problem solving is emphasized throughout.

MA TH 120.
INTERMEDIA TE ALGEBRA. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT=>19 or SAT=>450 or ISM 100 or Compass Pre-Algebra >56 or Algebra >33

Preparation for MATH 121, 129 and STAT 145. Covers linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, exponents, radicals, fractional expressions and equations, quadratic equations, perimeters, areas of simple geometric shapes, and logarithms. Emphasis on problem solving skills. Acceptable as credit toward graduation, but not acceptable to satisfy UNM core or group requirements.

MATH 121.
COLLEGE ALGEBRA. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT=>22 or SAT=>510 or (MATH 118 and MATH 119) or MATH 120 or Compass Algebra >54 or Compass College Algebra >33.

Preparation for MATH 150 and 180. The study of equations, functions and graphs, especially linear and quadratic functions. Introduction to polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications involving simple geometric objects. Emphasizes algebraic problem solving skills. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 123
TRIGONOMETRY (3)
Prerequisents ACT= 25 or SAT = 570 or MATH 121 or Compass College Algebra >54

Definition of the trigonometric functions, radian and degree measure, graphs, basic trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, complex numbers, polar coordinates and graphs, vectors in 2 dimensions. May be taken concurrently with MATH 150. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics

MATH 129.
A SURVEY OF MATH. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT=>22 or SAT=>510 or (MATH 118 and MATH 119) or MATH 120 or 121or123or150or162or163or180or181 or 264.

An introduction to some of the great ideas of mathematics, including logic, systems of numbers, sequences and series, geometry and probability. Emphasizes general problem-solving skills. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 150.
PRE-CALCULUS MA THEMA TICS. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT=>25 or SAT=>570 or MATH 121 or Compass College Algebra >54.

In-depth study of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Includes the fundamental theorem of algebra, systems of equations, conic sections, parametric equations and applications in geometry. Exploration of the graphing calculator. May be taken concurrently with MATH 123. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 162.
CALCULUS I. (4)
Prerequisite: (ACT=28-31 or SAT=640-700 or MATH 150 or Compass College Algebra >66) and (MATH 123 or Compass Trig >59) or (ACT=>32 or SAT=>700)

Limits. Continuity. Derivative: definition, rules, geometric and rate-of-change interpretations, applications to graphing, linearization and optimization. Integral: definition, fundamental theorem of calculus, substitution, applications to areas, volumes, work, average. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 163.
CALCULUS II. (4)
Prerequisite: 162

Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, numerical integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor series with applications, complex variables, differential equations.

MATH 180.
ELEMENTS OF CALCULUS I. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT=>26 or SAT=>600 or MATH 121 or MATH 150 or Compass College Algebra >66.

Limits of functions and continuity, intuitive concepts and basic properties; derivative as rate of change, basic differentiation techniques; application of differential calculus to graphing and minima-maxima problems; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics.

MATH 181.
ELEMENTS OF CALCULUS II. (3)
Prerequisite: 180

Includes the definite integral, multivariate calculus, simple differential equations, basic review of trigonometry and its relation to calculus.

MATH 215.
MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS III. (3)
Prerequisites: 111

Algebra from the viewpoint of the elementary curriculum with emphasis on proportional and linear relationships. Also included: topics from probability and statistics with connections to other topics in the elementary curriculum. Problem solving is emphasized throughout.

MATH 264.
CALCULUS III. (4)
Prerequisite: 163

Vector operations, vector representation of planes and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, tangent planes, optimization, multiple integrals in Cartesian cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals and Green’s theorem.

MEDIA ARTS

MA 110.
INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None
(Also offered as CJ 110.)

Study of the development of the mass media with emphasis on television in the areas of programming, policy, regulations, economics, and technology. Examination of the social, cultural, and political impact of the mass media on contemporary society.

MA 111.
TECHNICAL INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

For the student who has no practical knowledge of video technology. Students learn about the camera and lens, sound recording, lighting, editing, and other elements of production.

MA 210.
INTRODUCTION TO FILM. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

Analysis of film as a unique art, and a survey of main trends in film history. Screenings and critical study of major films.

MA 212.
BEYOND HOLLYWOOD. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee.

An introduction to marginalized cinemas with screenings of major works.

MA 216.
TOPIC IN VIDEO MAKING. (3)
Prerequisite: 111
Lab Fee.

These courses strengthen students’ skills in video technology while helping them write, direct, and edit video projects that begin to reflect a personal, artistic vision.

MUSIC

MUS 102.
MUSIC THEORY FOR NON MAJORS. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee.

Students will develop awareness of basic elements of melody, rhythm, harmony, form and expression through involvement as singers, players, creators, movers, listeners and readers of music. Designed for students with little or no musical training.

MUS 109.
GROUP VOICE. (1, no limit)
Prerequisite: None
Lab Fee.

Open to beginners in voice except voice performance majors. May be repeated for credit with permission of department chairperson (or dean)

MUS 110.
GROUP VOICE II. (1 no limit)
Prerequisite: MUS 109.
Lab Fee.

May be repeated for credit with permission of department chairperson (or dean).

MUS 139.
MUSIC APPRECIATION. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Designed to expand the student’s ability to listen actively to Western classical art music; a survey of the various genres, including chamber music, symphonic and vocal repertoire. Includes live guest performances. Attendance at several on- campus concerts required. No musical background necessary. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

MUS 172.
JAZZ HISTORY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A study of the evolution of jazz in the United States from its beginnings to the present. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

MUS 271.
MUSIC TODAY. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

A survey of how Western art music and popular music developed during the 20th century, especially with regard to the effect that social and economic forces had upon the art. Attendance at several on-campus concerts is required; discussion and live performances by guest musicians are included. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

NATV 150.
INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

This course surveys the significance of Native American Studies through an inter-disciplinary approach to four major areas of academic concentrations; Arts and Literature, Education and Language, Cultural Studies and Environment, and Leadership and Self- determination.

NATV 250.
SOCIOPOLITICAL CONCEPTS IN NATIVE AMERICA. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: 150.

Regional, national, and international laws and policies impacting sovereign Native American nations and communities are analyzed. Concepts such as colonization, nationalism, and globalization’s impact on Native American peoples are considered from an inter-disciplinary perspective.

NATV 252.
THE NA TIVE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. (3)
Prerequisite: None
(Also offered as AMST 252.)

Introductory survey of the Native American history, culture and contemporary issues. Students read literature by and about Native American covering a variety of topics including tribal sovereignty, federal policy, activism, economic development, education and community life.

NATV 255.
TOPICS IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: None

Topics courses taught by Native and non-Native faculty from the University of New Mexico and community, varying according to instructor’s expertise. May be repeated as topic varies.

NATURAL SCIENCE

NTSC 261L
PHYSICAL SCIENCE. (4)
Prerequisite: None

For pre-service K-8 teachers only. A broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the science of geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy, with emphasis on the science processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. The course is activity-based, utilizing a problems-and-issues based approach; various teaching methods are modeled and practiced by students; some field trips may be required.

NTSC 262L.
LIFE SCIENCE. (4)
Prerequisite: None

For pre-service K-8 teachers only. An activity- based study of science topics including botany, cell biology, genetics, microbiology and zoology with emphasis on science processes, inquiry and the integration of technology. Various teaching methods are modeled and practiced by students; some field trips may be required.

NTSC 263L.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE. (4)
Prerequisites: None

For pre-service K-8 teachers only. An activity- based interdisciplinary study of major issues in environmental science with emphasis on science process, scientific investigations and field-based activities and the integration of technology. Course topics include current issues on population, healthy ecosystems and natural resources. Various teaching methods are modeled and practiced by students.

NURSING

NURS 110.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. (1)
Prerequisite: None Corequisite: 115
Restriction: admitted to AS in Nursing program.

Introduces the nursing student to broad concepts of critical self-examination, self-evaluation and self-management as a precursor to personal accountability and responsibility necessary for effective nursing leadership and management. Emphasis on entry into the role of professional.

NURS 115.
NURSING FUNDAMENTALS. (8)
Prerequisite: None

Introduces concepts and skills foundational to Associate Degree nursing. Emphasis is placed on use of best practice and nursing process to provide care for individual older adults with chronic health needs in long term care.

NURS 130.
MEDICAL SURGICAL I. (5)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to medical-surgical nursing. Students will apply the nursing process in the care of an acute and/or chronically ill adult client in the acute care setting. Clinical application will take place in a variety of healthcare environments.

NURS 131.
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING. (4)
Prerequisite: None

Focuses on application of the nursing process to care for individuals experiencing normal and abnormal psychological responses to life stressors. Students will care for one client in acute and community settings.

NURS 230.
WOMEN’S HEALTH NURSING. (4)
Prerequisite: None

Focuses on the application of the nursing process to care for female clients, neonates, and families, before, during and after the birth process. Students will care for clients in a variety of inpatient and community settings.

NURS 232.
PEDIATRIC NURSING. (4)
Prerequisite: None

Focuses on application of the nursing process to care for the child and family. Students will care for clients in a variety of inpatient and community settings.

NURS 234.
MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING II. (5)
Prerequisite: None

Focuses on application of the nursing process to care for one or more adult clients and families with acute and chronic multisystem health problems. Clinical learning takes place in acute and community-based facilities and simulations labs.

NURS 239.
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 237, BIOL 247L and BIOL 239L.

An introduction to human pathophysiology. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of pathophysiology for nursing students.

NURS 240.
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II. (3)
Pre- or corequisite: 239, BIOL 238 and BIOL 248L.

This course is a continuation of Pathophysiology I. The course focuses on forming a basic understanding of Pathophysiology for nursing students.

NURS 242L.
NURSING PRACTICUM. (2)
Prerequisite: None

This clinical course provides assessment of the student's nursing knowledge, skills, and abilities in preparation for graduation while the student works with a preceptor RN in the acute, long- term, or community setting.

NURS 243.
MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING III. (9)
Prerequisite: None

The nursing process is applied in the care of the adult client with complex acute, life-threatening, multi-system health problems. Clinical learning will take place in outpatient and inpatient acute care settings and simulation labs.

NURS 245.
PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR. (1)
Prerequisite: None

This course explores theoretical application of nursing practice to develop expertise in management and leadership roles. Emphasis is on professional role development.

NUTRITION

NUTR 120.
NUTRITION FOR HEALTH. (3)
Prerequisite: None

General concepts of nutrition applied to food choices that support health. Cultural, psychological and economic implications of food choices.

NUTR 244.
HUMAN NUTRITION. (3)
Prerequisite: BIOL 123 or 201 or CHEM 111L or 121 and 123L.

This course provides an overview of all the nutrients including function in the body and food sources. Dietary guidelines intended to promote long term health are stressed.

PEACE STUDIES

PCST 102.
INTRODUCTION TO PEACE STUDIES. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to peace research. Primary content of Peace Studies Program; focuses on the concepts of peace/war, security/conflict, and violence/non-violence. Special emphasis on non- violent conflict resolution, human rights, and social/environmental justice issues.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 101.
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Philosophical issues and methodology illustrated through selected problems concerning values, knowledge, reality; and in social, political and religious philosophy. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 102.
CURRENT MORAL PROBLEMS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Ethical issues arising in contemporary society, e.g., sexual morality, preferential treatment, racism, punishment, war, world food distribution.

PHIL 108.
INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN PHILOSOPHIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Philosophical issues and methodology illustrated in relation to South and East Asian thought: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism.

PHIL 156.
REASONING AND CRITICAL THINKING. (3)
Prerequisite: None

The purpose of this course is to help students learn how to analyze, critique and construct arguments in context, in other words, how to read and write argumentative essays. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHIL 201.
GREEK THOUGHT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy, literature, and history. Figures: the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle; Homer and Sophocles; Herodotus and Thucydides.

PHIL 202.
FROM DESCARTES TO KANT. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An historical study of philosophical trends and controversies that characterize the development of early modern philosophy. This survey will cover the philosophies of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

PHIL 244.
INTRODUCTION TO EXISTENTIALISM. (3)
Prerequisite: None

An examination of the works of writers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Kafka and Sartre who emphasize such issues as death, decision, rebellion and faith.

PHIL 245.
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Examination of social and ethical problems associated with the business, engineering, medical and legal professions. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

PHYSICS

PHYC 102.
INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Designed to introduce non-science majors to basic concepts, laws and skills in physics, in various applications to ordinary life. Energy, momentum, force, wave phenomena, electric charge and light are discussed; also basic properties of gravitational, electromagnetic and nuclear forces. Selections from relativity, quantum theory, atoms and molecules will be included. See PHYC 102L for an optional laboratory. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 102L.
PHYSICS LABORATORY. (1)
Pre- or co requisite: 102

Students involve themselves in experiments and projects showing basic concepts related to the atom, the environment and the universe. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Two hours lab.

PHYC 105.
PHYSICS AND SOCIETY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Designed to introduce non-science majors to basic concepts, laws and skills in classical and quantum physics as a basis to discuss the interrelationships of society and physics. Examples where energy, momentum, special relativity, thermal physics, quantum and nuclear physics have important roles are discussed; these could include meteorology, aviation weather, fission and fusion reactors, science policy and ethics, alternative energy sources.

PHYC 108.
INTRODUCTION TO MUSICAL ACOUSTICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Designed to introduce non-science majors to basic concepts, laws and skills in physics, in the context of a study of sound, acoustics and music. Energy and force involved with the physical nature of sound waves; application to harmonics, tone quality, pitch. Sound production, propagation, detection and perception are demonstrated and illustrated by many different musical instruments, building acoustics and the behavior of the voice and the ear. See PHYC 108L for an optional laboratory.

PHYC 108L.
MUSICAL ACOUSTICS LABORATORY. (1)
Prerequisite: None
Pre- or corequisite: 108

Student involvement in experiments and demonstrations with sound waves, measurements of properties of musical instruments and electronic equipment measuring musical and acoustic properties. Two hours lab.

PHYC 110.
INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED PHYSICS. (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 121 or SAT=>570 or ACT=>25.

Preparatory course to review skills needed for PHYC 151/160. Reviews math skills (vectors, trigonometry, word problems, solving equations, etc.) through applications of physics principles to examples such as cell phones, musical instruments, CD players, driving, tools, projectiles, athletics, and electrical circuits.

PHYC 151.
GENERAL PHYSICS. (3)
Prerequisite: (MATH 123 or Compass Trig Test=>60) and (MATH 150 or MATH 162 or MATH 180 or ACT>27 or SAT>630).

Mechanics, sound, heat, fluid, waves. The sequence (151, 151L, 152, 152L) is required of pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-optometry students. Only 151 and 152 are required of pharmacy students. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 151L.
GENERAL PHYSICS LAB. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: 151.

Mechanics, sound, heat. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 152.
GENERAL PHYSICS. (3)
Prerequisite: 151

Electricity, magnetism, optics. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 152 L.
GENERAL PHYSICS LAB. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: 152

Electricity, magnetism, optics. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 160.
GENERAL PHYSICS. (3)
Pre- or co-requisite: MATH 162

Mechanics, sound. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 160L.
GENERAL PHYSICS LAB. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: 160. Three hrs. lab.

Mechanics, sound. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 161.
GENERAL PHYSICS. (3)
Prerequisite: 160. Pre- or co-requisite: MATH 163

Heat, electricity, magnetism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

PHYC 161L.
GENERAL PHYSICS LAB. (1)
Pre- or co-requisite: 161.

Electricity and magnetism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 200.
AMERICAN POLITICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of American politics, including political behavior of the American electorate, the theory of democracy, the structure and function of American political institutions, and contemporary issues. Meets New Mexico Lower- Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

POLS 220.
COMPARATIVE POLITICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Designed to give students the ability to understand and evaluate political regimes by focusing on the political history, socioeconomic structure and contemporary political institutions and behavior. Includes consideration of European and developing systems.

POLS 240.
INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Analyzes significant factors in world politics, including nationalism, “national interest,” ideology, international conflict and collaboration, balance of power, deterrence, international law and international organization.

PORTUGUESE

PORT 101
ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Development of all four language skills. Emphasis on listening, speaking and cultural understanding.

PORT 102
ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE II. (3)
Prerequisite: PORT 101

Continue development of all four language skills. Emphasis on listening, speaking and cultural understanding. An introduction to Portuguese for Spanish speakers.

PROFESSIONAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PEP 293.
TOPICS (1-3, no limit)

Topics may vary.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 105.
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Overview of the major content areas in psychology. Topics to be covered include learning, cognition, perception, motivation, biological systems, social and abnormal psychology, development, personality and approaches to psychotherapy. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

PSY 200.
STATISTICAL PRINCIPLES. (3)
Pre- or co-requisite: 105.

Presentation of the basic principles of the description and interpretation of data. Provides an acquaintance with statistical principles appropriate to a liberal arts education, as well as a basis for further work in data analysis. Students planning graduate study in any field are advised to take 300 and 302 as well.

PSY 220.
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 105.

Overview of the physical, perceptual, motor, cognitive, emotional and social development of children from infancy through adolescence.

PSY 231.
PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY. (3)
Prerequisite: 105

Exploration of the physiological, cultural, social and individual factors that influence sexual behavior, sex roles and sex identity.

PSY 240.
BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR. (3)
Prerequisite: 105 or BIOL 110 or BIOL 123.

A general survey of the biological foundations of behavior. Emphasis is on the central nervous system.

PSY 250.
SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY. (1-3, no limit)
Prerequisite: None

Study of any psychological topic not otherwise included in the curriculum upon expression of mutual interest by students and faculty. May be repeated for credit provided the subject matter varies.

PSY 260.
PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING AND MEMORY. (3)
Prerequisite: 105.

Survey of the variety of laboratory learning situations, with an emphasis on the application of principles to practical situations. Topics range from simple processes, such as conditioning, to complex processes, such as transfer, memory and concept formation.

PSY 265.
COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: 105

Study of the cognitive processes involved in the encoding, storage, retrieval and use of knowledge including attention, memory, comprehension, categorization, reasoning, problem solving and language.

PSY 271.
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: 105

Study of social influence: perception of oneself and others, attitudes, conformity, attraction, altruism, aggression, and groups.

PSY 280.
HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: 105.

This course introduces Health Psychology. The course will cover the role of stress in illness, coping with chronic illness, stress, and pain, and the role of health behavior in health and disease.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELG 103.
INTRODUCTION TO BIBLE. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Survey of Bible in historical context.

RELG 105.
RELIGION AND THE ARTS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the relationship between religion and culture as reflected in the arts.

RELG 107.
LIVING WORLD RELIGIONS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Introduction to major living world religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism.

RELG 230.
HEBREW SCRIPTURES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Pentateuch and the historical books of the Old Testament.

RELG 232.
CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

New Testament and early Christian history.

RELG 247.
STUDIES IN RELIGION. (3 to a maximum of 6)
Prerequisite: None

Elementary topics in the study of world religions. Course may be repeated up to three times provided the topics vary.

RELG 263.
EASTERN RELIGIONS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A study of major Asian traditions, such as Taoism, Hinduism and Buddhism.

RELG 264.
WESTERN RELIGIONS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

A study of major Western traditions, such as Christianity, Islam and Judaism.

RUSSIAN

RUSS 101.
ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Elementary Russian for students with no previous exposure to the language. Development of all four language skills: reading, speaking, writing and listening comprehension.

SIGN LANGUAGE

SIGN 201.
INTRODUCTION TO SIGN LANGUAGE. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Overview of signed language studies and related issues. Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL); signed communication systems most frequently used by deaf and hard of hearing individuals; the study of fingerspelling.

SIGN 210.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I. (3)
Prerequisite: 201.
Restriction: permission of instructor.

Study of ASL, including basic concepts and sign lexicon. Grammatical features of ASL will be stressed, along with structure and syntax. The student will be expected to demonstrate to the instructor his or her proficiency at the end of the semester.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 101.
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Basic concepts, topics and theories of contemporary sociology. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. Prerequisite for more advanced courses in sociology.

SOC 200.
FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL WELFARE. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Overview of social welfare institutions in Western societies related to social change, stratification, economy, politics, dependency, poverty, wealth, and unemployment in U.S. and other countries; examines social work and related human service occupations.

SOC 205.
CRIME, PUBLIC POLICY AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. (3)
Prerequisite: SOC 101.

The study of crime, the criminal justice system and crime-related public policy. Discussion of key criminological concepts, measurement of crime and delinquency, its distribution in society, victimization, public opinion, the criminal justice system, crime control strategies and policies.

SOC 211.
SOCIAL PROBLEMS. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Description and analysis of major social problems facing American society. Foci may include: poverty, homelessness, alcohol and drug problems, race and ethnic relations, aging and mental illness.

SOC 213.
DEVIANCE. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Survey of major forms of norm-violating behavior in American society, such as drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, criminal behavior and sexual deviance. Discussion of sociological explanations of the causes of, and attempts to address, these behaviors.

SOC 216.
DYNAMICS OF PREJUDICE. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

The study of prejudice and discrimination, including their historical and contemporary sources and prospects for their reduction, with applications to American institutions.

SOC 221.
GLOBAL ISSUES. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

The global context of patterns of development in nation-states with an emphasis on industrializing countries. Selected topics of social, economic and cultural change. Inequality, war, reform and revolution in global perspective. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

SOC 225.
MARRIAGE, FAMILY, AND THEIR ALTERNATIVES. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Comparative analysis of contemporary family and household forms such as dual-worker, single-parent and homosexual couple households. Focus on links between large-scale social changes and changing family composition and interaction patterns. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

SOC 230.
SOCIETY AND PERSONALITY. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

The social psychology of personalities, relationships, small groups and organizations.

SOC 280.
INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

A survey of the major methods of social research: foundations of social research, research design, sampling and measurement, quantitative and qualitative research methods and data analysis.

SPANISH

SPAN 101.
ELEMENTARY SPANISH I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Beginning Spanish for students with no previous exposure to Spanish. Development of all four language skills, with emphasis on listening and speaking.

SPAN 102.
ELEMENTARY SPANISH II. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Beginning Spanish for students who have completed 101 or equivalent. Continued development of four skills with emphasis on listening and speaking.

SPAN 103-104.
ELEMENTARY SPANISH CONVERSATION I-ELEMENTARY SPANISH CONVERSATION II. (1,1)
Pre- or corequisite: 101 or 102 or 111 or 112 or 275

Supplementary courses to Spanish 101–102 for students interested in additional practice in speaking. Offered on CR/NC basis only.

SPAN 111.
ELEMENTARY SHL I. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Beginning Spanish for students who grew up in a Spanish-speaking environment. Will build upon the language base which the students already possess. Development of all four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

SPAN 112.
ELEMENTARY SHL II. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Beginning Spanish for heritage language students who have completed 111 or equivalent. Continued development of the four skills with an emphasis on reading and writing, vocabulary building and review of grammar.

SPAN 201.
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. (3)
Prerequisite: 102 or native fluency

Intermediate Spanish for students who have completed 102 or equivalent. Review of grammar and further development of all four skills.

SPAN 202.
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. (3)
Prerequisite: 201 or native fluency

Intermediate Spanish for students who have completed 201 or equivalent. Continued development of all four skills with emphasis on reading.

SPAN 203.
SPANISH CONVERSATION. (3)
Prerequisite: 201 or 202 or 211 or 212 or 276

For students who have completed or are currently enrolled in Spanish 201, 202 or 276. Small classes designed to increase skills in speaking Spanish. Not for native speakers

SPAN 211.
INTERMEDIATE SHL I (3)
Prerequisite: 111 and 112

Intermediate Spanish for heritage language students who have completed 102 or equivalent. Review of grammar and continued development of the four skills with an emphasis on literacy and speaking.

SPAN 212.
INTERMEDIATE SHL I. (3)
Prerequisite: 111 and 112

Intermediate Spanish for heritage language students who have completed 201 or equivalent. Further development of all four skills, with an emphasis on reading authentic materials, on practical writing needs and communicating with other native speakers.

SPAN 276.
ACCELERATED INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. (6)
Prerequisite: 102 or 112 or 275

Intensive one-semester course designed for language enthusiasts who want a review or can devote the time required to cover two semesters in one. Equivalent to 201 and 202

SPAN 278.
SPANISH FOR PROFESSIONALS. (3)
Prerequisite: 11 and 112 and 211 and 212

This course is a specially designed course for professionals in the fields of medicine, law, business, office management. Attention is given to specialized professional vocabularies.

SPAN 293.
TOPICS COURSE (3, no limit)

Prerequisite: None

Topics may vary.

STATISTICS

STAT 145.
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS. (3)
Prerequisite: ACT = >22 or SAT = >510 or (MATH 118 and MATH 119) or MATH 120 or 121 or 123 or 150 or 162 or 163 or 180 or 181 or 264.

Techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data, descriptive statistics, introduction to probability and basic probability models used in statistics, introduction to sampling and statistical inference, illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area II: Mathematics.

THEATRE

THEA 130.
ACTING I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Exploration of the basic fundamentals of acting through exercises, games and improvisation. Development of the imaginative, physical and emotional skills of the actor.

THEA 131.
ACTING II. (3)
Prerequisite: 130
Lab fee
Continued exploration of the actor's craft. Introductory work with text.

THEA 200.
THEATRE PRACTICUM. (1 to a maximum of 4)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Participation in University theatre season in production capacity. May not duplicate other course assignments. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

THEA 230.
ACTING III. (3)
Prerequisite: 131
Pre- or Corequisite: 231
Lab fee

Continued exploration of acting technique. Emphasis on methods of study and preparation for presentation of scenework drawn from contemporary drama. Integration of voice and movement skills with acting technique.

THEA 231.
VOICE AND MOVEMENT I. (3)
Prerequisite: 130
Lab fee

Basic vocal and physical skills with emphasis on relaxation, breath, and freeing the voice. Consideration of placement, articulation and support. Voice work is combined with movement to connect the expressive impulse to the entire body.

THEA 295.
STUDIES IN THEATER. (1-3, to a maximum of 9)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee

Lecture and studio study on various topics in Theatre.

UNIVERSITY STUDIES

UNIV 101.
SEMINAR: INTRODUCTION TO UNM AND HIGHER EDUCAITON.

Prerequisite: None

Designed to accelerate successful transition to university life.

WOMEN'S STUDIES

WMST 200.
INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN STUDIES. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Analysis of the intersectional influences of gender, race, class, sexuality, nationality and other factors of identity; examination of expressions of gender and sexuality in regional, national, and international contexts; discussion of social and political movements.

WMST 231.
PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY.
(3)
Prerequisite: PSY 105.
(Also offered as PSY 231.)

Exploration of the physiological, cultural, social and individual factors that influence sexual behavior, sex roles and sex identity.

WMST 279.
INTERDISCIPLINARY TOPICS. (3 to a maximum of 9)
Prerequisite: None

Can be repeated for credit three times by students earning a major or minor in Women Studies.

WOODWORKING

WW 101.
BASIC WOODWORKING I. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee. (does not include student materials)

This course introduces students to the joys of working wood. Including: hand and power tool safety, stock preparation and basic joinery techniques.

WW 102.
FUNDAMENTALS OF WOODWORKING II: HAND TOOLS AND JOINERY. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Explore the efficiency and precision of hand tools! Includes: shop safety, project layout, stock preparation, joinery, and construction.

WW 108.
WOOD LAMINATION AND BENDING. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Introduces lamination for creating large forms and bent forms. Includes: forms, clamping, laminated joinery and decorative lamination.

WW 110.
FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. (3)
Prerequisite: 101
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)

Creating furniture from conception to complete work! Includes: history of furniture design, drawing furniture, woods, joinery, construction techniques and shop safety.

WW 111.
CABINET BUILDING. (3)
Prerequisite: 101

Cabinet making in contemporary and Spanish Colonial styles. Including construction, finishing techniques and use of counter top materials.

WW 113.
SPANISH COLONIAL FURNITURE. (3)
Prerequisite: 101
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)

Lab-based course in design, carving and building Spanish Colonial Furniture using traditional styles and methods.

WW 116.
CHAIR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.
(3)
Prerequisite: 101 and 110

For students that have already constructed tales. Includes: history, chair design, engineering, machining, assembly and finish.

WW 117.
WOOD CARVING. (3)
Prerequisite: None
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)

This course introduces woodcarving-- the tools, safety practices, and basic techniques, including chip carving, low relief carving, texturing, and tool sharpening.

WW 118.
WOOD CARVING II. (3)
Prerequisite:101 and 110 Instructor permission.
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)

Introduces veneering, coopering, compound- angle joinery, and laminate bending. Students design and build an original piece of furniture.

WW 120.
WOODWORKING SHOP. (3)
Prerequisite: 101, 110 and 111
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)
This course is for student who have completed basic woodworking courses and are prepared to work on individual projects.

WW 135.
WOOD SCULPTURE. (3)
Prerequisite: 101
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)

An introduction to wood sculpting. Includes: history, wood varieties, safety, tools, and techniques using solid and laminated wood blocks.

WW 136.
WOOD LAMINATING AND BENDING. (3)
Prerequisite: WW 101 and one other WW course, or consent of instructor.
Lab fee. (Does not include student materials.)

This advanced course is an introduction to wood lamination as a technique for creating large forms of solid wood and for creating bent forms. This course discusses clamping, forms, presses, hand tools and power machinery, laminated joinery, and decorative lamination.

WW 293.
TOPICS. (3)
Prerequisite: None

Topics may vary.